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Full text of "Pictorial Pickwickiana; Charles Dickens and his illustrators. With 350 drawings and engravings by Robert Seymour, Buss, H.K. Browne ("Phiz") Leech, "Crowquill", Onwhyn, Sibson, Heath, Sir John Gilbert ... C.R. Leslie ... F.W. Pailthorpe, Charles Green ... Notes on contemporaneous illustrations and "Pickwick" artists"

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PICTORIAL 
PICKWICKIAN^ 

CHARLES DICKEN.- 

\\MTH 350 i 



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NOTE 



EDITED BY 



PICTORIAL 
PICKWICKIANA 

CHARLES DICKENS AND HIS ILLUSTRATORS 



WITH 350 DRAWINGS AND ENGRAVINGS 

BY 

ROBERT SEYMOUR, BUSS, H. K. BROWNE (" PHIZ"), LEECH, "CROWQUILL 
ONWHYN, SIBSON, HEATH, SIR JOHN GILBERT, R.A., 
C. R. LESLIE, R.A., F. \V. PAILTHORPE, 
CHARLES GREEN, R.I., 

ETC., ETC. 

NOTES ON CONTEMPORANEOUS ILLUSTRATIONS 
AND "PICKWICK" ARTISTS 



EDITED BY JOSEPH GREGO 



IN TWO VOLUMES 
VOL. II 



LONDON: CHAPMAN AND HALL, LTD. 
1899 

All rights reservea. 



RICHARD CLAY AND SONS, LIMITED. 
LONDON AND BCXGAT. 




or 

S68728 



CONTENTS OF VOL. II 



PAGE 

"MR. PICKWICK ADDRESSING THE PICKWICK CLUB." 
From the picture by Charles Green, R.I Frontispiece. 

PICKWICK CHARACTERS. BY KENNY MEADOWS- 
MR. PICKWICK. From Bell's Life in London. 1838 3 

SAMUEL WELLER. ,, ,, ,, 5 

" PICKWICK " ON THE STAGE 7 

" PICKWICK " DRAMATISED, VARIOUS VERSIONS 8 

"THE PEREGRINATIONS OF PICKWICK," BY W. LEMAN REDE, 

Theatre Royal, Adelphi, 1837 12 

W. LEMAN REDE'S ADVERTISEMENT 14 

" SAM WELLER; OR, THEPICKWICKIANS," BY W. T. MONCRIEFF, 

New Strand Theatre, 1837 16 

MONCRIEFF'S ADVERTISEMENT 18 

DICKENS ox HIS UNINVITED ADAPTORS 21 

THE AUTHOR'S GRIEVANCES 22 

ILLUSTRATIONS. PICTORIAL VERSIONS OF "PICKWICK" 
THEATRICAL CHARACTERS 

MR. W. J. HAMMOND AS "SAM WELLER." New Strand 

Theatre, 1837 25 

MR. W. J. HAMMOND AS "SAM WELLER," New Strand 

Theatre, 1837 27 

MR. J. LEE AS " JINGLE," New Strand Theatre, 1837 29 

MR. H. HALL AS "MR. WELLER, SENR.," New Strand 

Theatre, 1837 31 

MR. WILLIAM ATTWOOD AS "JOB TROTTER," New Strand 

Theatre, 1837 33 

FRONTISPIECE TO DRAMATISED VERSION OF " BARDELL VERSUS 

PICKWICK " ... 3 



viii CONTENTS 

PAGE 

PICKWICK PIRACIES, PLAGIARISMS, FORGERIES, IMITA- 
TIONS, AND SO-CALLED "CONTINUATIONS" 37 

" Bos " PIRACIES " THE PENNY PICKWICK " 39' 

ILLUSTRATIONS PICTORIAL WRAPPER 45- 

,, OPENING NUMBER (SPECIMEN PAGE, 1) ... 47 

"Bos" PIRACIES " PICKWICK IN AMERICA" 49- 

ILLUSTRATIONS PICTORIAL WRAPPER 55- 

,, OPENING NUMBER (SPECIMEN PAGE, 1) ... 57 

" PICKWICK ABROAD; OR, THE TOUR IN FRANCE" 59 

ILLUSTRATIONS PICTORIAL WRAPPER, BY A. CROWQUILL ... 67 
,, PICTORIAL WRAPPER, BY G. G. (Wil- 

loughby's Edition) 69 

,, FRONTISPIECE AND TITLE- PACE, BY JOHN 

PHILLIPS 71 

"THE PICKWICK GAZETTE," 1837 ILLUSTRATED BY ROBERT 

CRUIKSHANK 73 

ILLUSTRATION TITLE-PAGE 75 

" THE PICKWICK .SONGSTER "- 

ILLUSTRATIONS PICTORIAL WRAPPER 77 

,, SPECIMEN PAGE, "THE FAT BOY" 79 

ILLUSTRATION PICKWICKIAN ENVELOPE (Parody of the "Mul- 

ready Postal Envelope ") 81 

PICKWICKIANA 

W. C. W. "PORTRAITS OF PICKWICK CHARACTERS," 1837 ... 83 
" THE BEAUTIES OF PICKWICK : COLLECTED AND ARRANGED BY 

SAM WELLER," 1838 84 

" PARK'S ORIGINAL STAGE TRANSFORMATION TRICKS " 84 

"PORTRAITS OF THE PICKWICK CHARACTERS" ("The Casket of 

Literature, Science, and Entertainment '') 85 

" GALLERY OF COMICALITIES" (Bell's Lift in. London) 86 

" TIDDY DOLL," 1840 86 

SONG BOOKS 

"MR. PICKWICK'S COLLECTION OF SONGS." About 1837 ... 87 

"SAM WELLER'S FAVORITE SONG-BOOK." About 1837 ... 87 

"SAM WELLER'S PICKWICK JEST-BOOK." About 1837 ... 87 

" THE LONDON SINGER'S MAGAZINE." About 1839 87 

"THE PICKWICK COMIC ALMANACK FOR 1838" 87 

" LLOYD'S PICKWICKIAN SONGSTER." About 1839 87 

" TWELFTH-NIGHT (' PlCKWICK ') CHARACTERS." " Lloyd's New 

Twelfth-Night Characters " 88 

" TWELFTH - NIGHT (' PICKWICK') CHARACTERS." "Langley's 

Twelfth-Night Characters." Engraved by MARKS. 1841... 89 



CONTENTS ix 

PICKWICKIANA (continued) 

" TWELFTH-NIGHT (' PICKWICK ') CHARACTERS." " Fairburn's 
Pickwick Characters. " ' ' The Pickwick Twelfth-Night 
Cake." Engra veil by MARKS. 1841 89 

"THE ADVENTURES OF MARMADUKE MIDGE, THE PICKWICKIAN 

LEGATEE" 90 

"SAM WELLER'S SCRAP SHEET, CONTAINING ALL THE ' PICK- 
WICK ' PORTRAITS " 93 

DICKENS'S SUFFERINGS AT THE HANDS OF CERTAIN PIRATICAL 

GANGS 97 

DICKENS VAINLY SEEKING LEGAL REDRESS 98 

DICKENS'S "Boz PROCLAMATION" AGAINST IMITATORS AND 

PIRATICAL GANGS *> 99 

-PICKWICK" REVIVED, BY CHARLES DICKENS, 1840 

ILLUSTRATIONS LIST OF "PHIZ" ILLUSTRATIONS TO THE 
"REVIVED ' PICKWICK,'" 1840. (Nine drawings on 

wood by Hablot Knight Browne. 1840 102 

FROM " MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK " 105 

" PICKWICK AND THE CLOCK CLUB" 122 

"MR. WELLER'S WATCH" 134 

FIRST CHEAP EDITION. 1847 157 

THE PUBLISHERS' ANNOUNCEMENT 159 

DICKENS'S "ADDRESS" TO THE PUBLIC 161 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

C. R. LESLIE, R.A. FRONTISPIECE : "MRS. BARDELL FAINT- 
ING IN MR. PICKWICK'S ARMS," BY C. R. LESLIE, R.A. ... 167 
"Pniz." EXTRA ILLUSTRATIONS, DRAWN BY "PHIZ," FOR 

THE 1847 EDITION OF "PICKWICK" 169 

,, LIST OF EXTRA PLATES BY "Pniz" 174 

,, Six DRAWINGS ON WOOD, BY HABLOT KNIGHT 

BROWNE. 1847 175 

,, "ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS TO THE ' PICKWICK 
PAPERS ' " (for binding witli the First Cheap 

Edition). 1847 187 

,, LIST OF SIXTEEN* ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS, DRAWN 

ON WOOD 190 

.,, PICTORIAL WRAPPER TO SERIES, REPRODUCING 
FOURTEEN PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS IN "PICK- 
WICK" 191 

.,, SIXTEEN DRAWINGS ON WOOD, DESIGNED FOR EXTRA 
ILLUSTRATING THE FlRST CHEAP EDITION OF 
"PICKWICK." 1847.. 193 



CONTENTS 



FIRST CHEAP EDITION. 1847 (continued) 

SIR JOHN f PLATES TO ILLUSTRATE THE CHEAP EDITION* OF 

GILBERT, R. A. \ "PICKWICK." 1847 227 

,, LIST OF THIRTY-TWO ILLUSTRATIONS, DRAWN ON 

WOOD, BY SIR JOHN GILBERT, R.A ... 228 

,, FRONTISPIECE WRAPPER AND SERIES OF THIRTY- 

TWO DRAWINGS ON WOOD TO ILLUSTRATE THE 
FIRST CHEAP EDITION OF " PICKWICK." 1847 229 



THE FIRST LIBRARY EDITION. 1858 297- 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

"PHiz." Two "PICKWICK' VIGNETTES, DESIGNED BY HABL&T 
KNIGHT BROWNE FOR THE LIBRARY EDITION, 

1858 298 

,, " PICKWICK," VOL. I. "YARD OF THE ' BCLL 
INN,' WHITECHAPEL." " Mr. Pickwick setting 
out for Ipswich by Tony Weller's Coach " ... 299 
,, " PICKWICK," VOL. II. "SAM AND MARY." 
"Sam finds it difficult to decipher his father's 
letter without assistance " 301 

THE HOUSEHOLD EDITION. 1874 
ILLUSTRATIONS 

"Pniz." LIST OF "Pniz's" FIFTY-SEVEN ILLUSTRATIONS TO 

THE HOUSEHOLD EDITION 303 

,, SERIES OF FIFTY-SEVEN DRAWINGS ON WOOD BY 

HABLOT KNIGHT BROWNE. 1874 307 

,, Two EXTRA DRAWINGS DESIGNED FOR THE HOUSE- 
. HOLD EDITION (Unwed) 347 & 367 

EXTRA ILLUSTRATIONS 

"SCENES FROM THE 'PICKWICK PAPERS,'" DESIGNED AND 
DRAWN ON STONE BY AUGUSTUS DULCKEN. 1861 427 

J. GREGO. "THE STORY OF THE GOBLINS WHO STOLE A 

SEXTON" 429 

,, FACSIMILE REPRODUCTIONS OF THREE DESIGNS BY 

JOSEPH GREGO (UnpuWiithed) 431 

,, "THE STORY OF THE BAGMAN'S UNCLE" ("The 

ghostly passengers in the ghost of a mail ") 
,, FACSIMILE REPRODUCTIONS OF FIVE DESIGNS BY 

JOSEPH GREGO ( UnpitMi*hed) 437 



CONTENTS xi 

PAGE 

EXTRA ILLUSTRATIONS, PUBLISHED BY ROBSON AND 
KERSLAKE. 1882 

FREDERICK W. f TWENTY-FOUR ILLUSTRATIONS TO THE " PICKWICK 

PAILTHORPE I CLUB" 449 

,, LIST OF PAILTHORPE'S EXTRA PLATES 452 

,, DESIGN FOR WRAPPER AND FRONTISPIECE, BY 

FREDK. W. PAILTHORPE 453 

,, " THE BAGMAN'S UNCLE," BY FREDK. W. PAIL- 
THORPE 455 

,, EXTRA TITLE-PAGE, " MR. WELLER, SENR.," 

DESIGNED FOR VOL. II. " PICKWICK," BY F. 

W. PAILTHORPE 459 

,, EXTRA TITLE-PAGE, "SAM WELLER," FOR 

VOL. III. " PICKWICK," BY F. W. PAILTHORPE 461 
,, EXTRA TITLE - PAGE, " MR. STIGGINS," FOR 

VOL. IV. " PICKWICK," BY F. W. PAILTHORPE 463 
"KYD" CHARACTER SKETCHES FROM CHARLES DICKENS, 

PORTRAYED IN A SERIES OF ORIGINAL WATER- 

COLOUR SKETCHES BY "KYD" 467 

FRED BARNARD'S "PICKWICK" DRAWINGS 469 

CHARLES GREEN, R.I., AS A DICKENS ILLUSTRATOR 471 

ILLUSTRATION CHARLES GREEN, R.I. FRONTISPIECE: "PIC- 
TORIAL EDITION" OF CHARLES DICKENS'S WORKS 475 

H. M. PAGET 

PICKWICK PICTURF.S. 1891 477 

CHRISTOPHER COVENY. SYDNEY. 1883- 

TWENTY SCENES FROM THE WORKS OF DICKENS, DESIGNED AND 

ETCHED BY CHRISTOPHER COVENY 481 

LIST OF COVENY'S "PICKWICK" ETCHINGS 482 

ILLUSTRATION TITLE-PAGE TO " SCENES FROM DICKENS," 
DESIGNED AND ETCHED BY CHRISTOPHER COVENY. 
SYDNEY. 1883 483 

AMERICAN ILLUSTRATORS v .. 485 

F. O. C. DARLEY 487 

ILLUSTRATIONS FOUR ORIGINAL DESIGNS BY F. O. C. DARLEY 

TO ILLUSTRATE " PICKWICK" , 489 

F. 0. C. DARLEY'S LARGE DICKENS DRAWINGS AND ILLUSTRA- 
TIONS 497 

LIST OF THIRTEEN CHARACTER SKETCHES BY F. O. C. DARLEY. 

1888 ... , 499 



ill 



CONTENTS 



I'AOE 



AMERICAN ILLUSTRATORS (continued) 

S EYTINOE.JUNR.-" THE AMERICAN DIAMOND EDITION" ... -Wl 
LIST OF SIXTEEN ORIGINAL WOOD-CUT ILLUSTRATIONS, BY 8. 

EYTISI.E, JUNR. BOSTON, U.S. 1867 . 
Ii , I-STR VTION-" MR. PICKWICK'S RECEPTION. " ' Sam \\ eller 
intrcxluces Mr. Pickwick to the leading characters in 
Mr. Dicker's Novels." Drawn by S. Eytinge, Junr., 
expressly for Erery Saturtlay, No. 15, April 9, 1870... ... oU3 

LIST OF FlFTY-TWO ILLUSTRATIONS TO THE " PlCKWICK PAPERS, 

BY THOMAS NAST 

LIST OF TWELVE ORNUNAL FCLL-PAUK ILLUSTRATIONS TO THE 
" PICKWICK PAPERS," BY ARTHUR B. FROST 



PICKWICK CHARACTERS 
BY KENNY MEADOWS 



VOL. n 




'Pickwick Characters" (Bell's Life in London, 1838), 
Drawn by Kenny Meadows. 

MR. PICKWICK. 

From an original drawing in Boz Hall. 
BM't Life, Sunday, March 25, 1838. 



Offspring of Box's fertile brain 
Whose bright creations never fail, 

Enter our gallery with thy train 
Sire of the Pickwick Club, all hail. 

Welcome, thou man of Goswell Street, 
To warm and kindly feeling true ; 

And in Belt's sporting journal greet 
Old friends this day with feature 

Enlarged in form, as thou in heart, 
A gallant race well-braced to run, 



With thee, old boy, we'll make a start, 
Long trained to sport, and backed by fun. 

Rivals before us soon must fall, 

Or very far behind us follow ; 
The "go-by" Sell will give them all, 

And distance competition hollow. 

Come, then, old friend, and join our ranks, 
And take with us a cheerful cup, man ; 

While gaily we recall the pranks 
Of Winkle, Snodgrass Sam, and 
Tupman. 

E 2 




" Pickwick Characters " (Bell's Life in London, 1838). 
Drawn by Kenny Meadows. 

SAMIVEL VELLER. 

(Taken expressly for the Host of " The White Hart," in the Borough.) 
Bell's Life, Sunday, April 1, 1838. 



Staunch comrade of the Pickwick corps, 
To merriment a constant spur, 

Who sported on thy skull of yore 
A " wentilation gossamer." 

Faith, thou'rt an out-and-outer thorough, 
And much the public has admired you. 

Since from "The White Hart" in the 

Borough, 
Pickwick the philanthropic hired you. 

Welcome, thou shrewd and trusty lad, 
With sayings quaint and winning eye 

By Jove, this day we're very glad 
Thou hast not proved an alibi. 

To Pickwick-duty wide awake, 
None in that service could be hotter ; 



Though you were once, and no mistake 
Completely diddled by Job Trotter. 

Who can forget thy valentine, 
With double-gilt edge ornamented, 

When low you bent at Cupid's shrine, 
By Mary's beauty " circumwented " '? 

Who can that knowing scheme forget, 
When tried in sunshine or disaster, 

Old dad arrested you for debt, 
And locked you up with Pick your 
master? 

Who shall dispute Sam Weller's claim 
To rank among the Pickwick sages ? 

Class'd with that honour' d Club, his fame 
Shall flourish fair in future ages. 



PICKWICK ON THE STAGE. 

PROMINENT amongst Charles Dickens's substantial grievances 
was the predative manner in which violent hands were laid 
on his literary offspring, for the advantage of the unprincipled 
enterprisers, who, in piratical fashion, annexed his own 
creations, recklessly disfiguring, hacking, and altering the 
creatures of his fancy under the shallow pretence of paying 
" Boz " a compliment by serving up to the public maimed 
and distorted travesties, which could not fail to burlesque and 
depreciate Dickens's own original writings. Plagiarism was 
carried to incredible lengths, as will be shown in the shameless 
piratical pseudo-" continuations " of the " Pickwick Club 
Papers." The most flagrant examples of these base attempts 
are given in the present work, together with samples of the 
indignant denunciations by " Boz " vainly hurled against the 
shameless despoilers. The phenomenal success of " Pickwick " 
had its vexations, drawbacks and penalties; what the susceptible 
author suffered from his barefaced imitators was best known 
to his confidential advisers, Forster, Talfourd, &c. ; apart 
from these confidences we find Dickens on occasions relieving 
his outraged feelings by characteristic onslaughts " in print " 
upon the most unscrupulous of the piratical crew. 

Naturally playwrights were in the front ranks of these 
offenders, for Dickens legitimately protested against his stories 
being stolen " without your leave ;" the injustice of the theft 
being intensified by the aggravating circumstance that, 
for dramatic purposes while the interest of the famous 



8 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

fictions held the reading public these predaceous adaptors 
found it expedient to seize the novels when only a portion 
of these admirable works were published, or even written, 
and hence it arose that these unscrupulously ingenious gentry 
further offended beyond endurance, by forestalling the 
denouements in their own clumsy fashions ; coining to a lame 
impotent climax, of their own devising six months before 
the author had wound-up his story, or favoured his readers 
with the authentic conclusion. Here indeed was a grievance 
the effect of which on a sensitive mind and temperament 
so finely strung as that of the author cannot be over- 
estimated. 

The dedication of the "Pickwick Papers" to Sergeant 
Talfourd is dated September 27th, 1837, the concluding double 
number (Parts XIX. and XX.) being issued in November; 
long before that date there had appeared on the stage several 
adaptations professing to finish the story, and all necessarily 
bringing the plot to a "finale" more or less novel to the 
victimised, ill-used, and disgusted " Bo/," who was tempted in 
Xicholax Nickleby to set on record, through the mouth-piece of 
his youthful hero, his personal grievances against the inde- 
fensible proceedings of so-called " dramatists," at whose hands 
he had thus suffered. 

Contemporary with the still unfinished " PICKWICK PAPERS " 
while the serial about two-thirds published was being 
issued to the public in monthly parts, several dramatised 
versions were advertised for performance. Of those actually 
in representation at the time there were two leading produc- 
tions at the Adelphi and Strand theatres respectively. 

" THE PEREGRINATIONS OF PICKWICK." An acting drama in 
three acts. By Willian Leman Rede ; 1837. This was pro- 
duced at the Adelphi Theatre, April 10th, 1837, where it was 
heralded bv a fine flourish of announcements. 

" SAM WELLER, OR THE PICKWICKIANS." A drama in three 
Acts, by William Thomas Moncrieff, 1837. 

" THE PICKWICKIANS, OR, THE PEREGRINATIONS OF SAM 



PICKWICK ON THE STAGE 9 

WELLEB," arranged from Moncrieffs adaptation, was published 
by T. H. Lacy, 1850. 

MoncriefTs adaptation is described as the most successful ; 
this version was produced under the direction of W. J. 
Hammond at the New Strand Theatre, July 10th, 1837. A 
great hit was made in this piece by W. J. Hammond himself, 
in the character of " Sam Weller." 

"THE PICKWICK CLUB, a Burletta in Three Acts," is as- 
signed by Percy Fitzgerald to Edward Stirling, the actor, 
whose name, as it happens, is found in the list of performers 
playing in the Adelphi adaptation, arranged by W. Leman 
Rede. 

Mr. Percy Fitzgerald, M.A., F.S.A., in his painstaking and 
exhaustive "History of Pickwick" (Chapman and Hall, 
1891), to which references have been made in the course of 
this work, has further alluded to the version of " PICKWICK " 
dramatised for the City Theatre by an unfortunate being, 
whom Dickens had occasion to denounce more than once, with 
sufficiently withering scorn, as will be seen. This wretched 
creature, according to Dickens's own scathing story, was 
under contract to furnish the management with seven melo- 
dramas for five pounds ; " to enable him to do which, a room 
had been hired in a gin-shop close by." These headquarters, 
congenial to the spirit of the adaptor, proved a fatal 
stumbling block to his industry ; for, yielding to surrounding 
temptations, he remained in a consistent state of perpetual 
drunkenness, and the contract was in consequence jeopardised ; 
although it is inferred from Boz's fierce invective that there 
was a profit on the transaction, for Dickens thought proper 
to write : " Well, if it has been the means of putting a few 
shillings in the vermin-eaten pockets of so miserable a 
creature, let him empty out his little pot of filth and 
welcome." 

The present purpose is limited to the consideration of 
versions of " PICKWICK " adaptations contemporaneous with 
the original issue of that epoch-marking production ; it may 



10 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

be added in this place that theatrical adaptations of " PICK- 
WICK," down to recent times, have demonstrated the ever- 
juvenile and stimulating vigour of the work in question ; the 
public will have fresh in recollection the lively adaptation 
" PICKWICK "" by James Alberv, brought out at the Lyceum 
Theatre, October 23, 1871, under Mr. Bateman's manage- 
ment, with the view of enabling Sir Henry Irving otherwise 
an enthusiastic appreciator of Dickens, and himself a collector 
of " Dickensiana " to delight the public with his vivacious 
interpretation of " Jingle " a character closely allied with 
the same gifted actor's version of " Jingle's " not very distant 
relative the facetious " Jeremy Diddler, 11 another favourite 
impersonation of Irv ing's, and equally dear to popular fame. ' 

PICKWICK AT THE ADELPHI. 

Alluding to the appetising bill of the Adelphi version by 
William Leman Rede, Mr. Percy Fitzgerald has pointed out 
that this production " must have been moral torture to the 
author, in spite of the nauseous compliments with which the 
adapters tried to propitiate him. At the same time it is 
difficult not to be amused at the ingenuity with which the 
writers made the most of, and ' beat out, 1 as it were, the 
meagre materials at their disposal. This mode, however, of 
laying out a ' good bill, 1 and piquing the readers with an 
anticipatory sketch of the plot, was then in high fashion." 

The announcement, here reproduced, is in the nature of a 
PICKWICKIAN curiosity, pleasantly recalling the ingenuity 
of " Manager Crummies " in his most fertile moments of 
theatrical inspiration. 

It will be remarked that the adaptor, seeking strong melo- 
dramatic interest, has interwoven the " Story about a Queer 
Client 11 (PICKWICK, Chap. XXL), turned about and expanded 
at his own discretion ; this " serious story " upplies the 
fabric of the opening scene, and its unwarranted continuation 
is " sandwiched-in " between musical interludes ; an Irish 



PICKWICK ON THE STAGE 11 

" variety " monologue by Mrs. Fitzwilliam (an accomplished 
vocalist, known to fame as a sweet ballad-singer), with such 
excerpts from the veritable " PICKWICK PAPERS " as " The 
Club," " The Rochester Ball, 11 " The White Hart Inn in the 
Borough," " Old Wardle's Manor Farm, Dingley Dell," with 
two elopements thrown in, and the Marshalsea substituted in 
place of the Fleet prison. 

The performance at the Adelphi was evidently an im- 
portant venture as regards the " cast " offered ; for the ladies 
included such popular favourites as Mrs. Yates, Mrs. Young, 
with the vocal and tuneful Mrs. Fitzwilliam ; amongst the 
actors were such leading lights and long-established favourites 
as Mr. O. Smith, Mr. Yates as " Pickwick," Buckstone as 
" Alfred Jingle," and that admirable comedian, John Reeve, 
as " Sam Weller," Mr. Sanders as " Old Weller," Mr. Sterling, 
appropriately, as the poetical " Snodgrass," &c. We give 
the " Bill " to tell its own story : 



12 PICTORIAL PK'KWK'KIANA 

THEATRE ROYAL, ADELPHI. 

<T The new piece of the PKIIKGKIXATIOXS OK PICKWICK is 
eminently successful. The personation of PICKWICK, 
JIXGLE, and SAM WELLER, is unique. The roars of 
laughter are incessant. The serious interest intense. 
The house full. 

Monday, April 10th (1837), and during the week, will 
be presented an original, Serio-Comic Burletta, in three Acts, 
interspersed with music, founded on the celebrated " Papers " 
written by " Boz," and entitled the 

PEREGRINATIONS OF PICKWICK. 

The " Papers" upon which this Drama is principally- 
founded, have obtained a celebrity wholly unexampled in that 
class of literature. The proprietors of the Adelphi were 
anxious to present it in the most favourable dramatic form to 
the public ; a serious story (the incidents from an episode in 
the " PICKWICK PAPERS") has therefore been interwoven with 
the (sic) pre-ambulations of the " PICKWICKIAXS." 

A great portion of the comic dialogue Is extracted from the 
(PICKWICK) PAPERS by the express permission of the Author, 
C. Dickens, Esq., better known an " Boz" 

ACT I. THE MISER FATHER. 

Old Clutchley (a wealthy speculator) MR. 0. SMITH. 

George Heyling MR. HEHMINC. 

Maria (bttrothed to Heyliny) MRS. Y AXES. 

Norah (attendant on Miss Wardlt) MRS. FITZWILLIAM. 

THE CLUB. 

Charing Cross. CAB-&\iat\c Doings. A Meeting. A Journey. 
SAMUEL PICKWICK, Esq. (founder of the P.C., a 

gentleman of the inquiring sort) MR. YATES. 

Augustus Snodgrass, Esq., M. P. C MR. STIRLING. 

Tracy Tupman, Esq., M.P.C MR. ISMAY. 

Alfred Jingle (NOT) Esq. (a gentleman of a talkative 

sort) MR. BUCKSTONE. 



PICKWICK ON THE STAGE 13 

THE ELOPEMENT. 

Garden. A Father's Denunciation. The Flight. 
Air, " 0! Killarney's Lucid Lake " (Old Irish Melody) MRS. FITZWILLIAM. 

THE BALL AT ROCHESTER. 
Ante-room at Ball. Arrival of Visitors. PICKWICKIANS Pleasuring. 

Cutting Out and Cutting In. Fighting and Flirting. 
A. Wardle, Esq., of Dingley Dell (an old English 

Gentleman) MR. CULLENFORD. 

DR. SLAMMER, M.D MR. SANDERS. 

Joe (" The Fat Boy" a peripatetic somnambulist) ... MR. DUNN. 
Miss Wardle (maiden sister of Mr. Wardle) MRS. YOUNG. 

mi c- -nr 11 f MlSS A. CONWAY. 

The Misses Wardle -!..-. 

I MRS. FORSYTHE. 

Quadrille. Another Elopement. Pursuit. 

ACT II. WHITE HART INN, BOROUGH. 
Arrival of Pursuers. The Interview. The Compromise. 
SAM WELLER (Boots, ivith original notions respecting 

things in general) MR. JOHN REEVE. 

Mr. Perker (an Attorney) MR. YOUNG. 

Ostler MR. GIFFORD. 

Chambermaid Miss CONWAY. 

THE MARSHALSEA PRISON. 

Destitution. Unforgiving Father. Generous Hibernian. Catastrophe. 
Air, "The Grave where the Dear One Died" (Irish 

Melody) MRS. FITZWILLIAM. 

SPORTSMEN (Country and Cockney). 
The Banquet. Precautions. Effects of Punch and Speech-making. 

ACT III. 

Three years are supposed to have elapsed between the second and third 

Acts. 
Pichvick resumes his peregrinations in search of a new wonder. 

AN APARTMENT. 

AN IRISH MEDLEY MRS. FITZWILLIAM. 

Old Weller (father of Sam, a long-Stage coachman)... MR. SANDERS. 

A PRISON. 
Marian, the Restored Maniac. Repentance. Happiness. 

THE FETE AT MR. WARDLE'S. 
Christmas Party. Good News. Denouement. Finale and Dance. 



14 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

The printed version of the Adelphi and Surrey " Pick- 
wickian " drama is of further interest, as the adaptor in his 
introductory note, although somewhat late after the event, 
has herein candidly confessed that he had dramatised the 
" Papers " against his own private convictions of their fitness 
for the stage. 

THE PEREGRINATIONS OF PICKWICK, 

A DRAMA IN THREE ACTS, 
BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE, 

Author of "Faith and Falsehood," &c. &c. 

Printed from the Acting Copy with a description of the 

costumes cast of the characters exits and entrances 

and the whole of the business. 

As FIRST PERFORMED AT THE ADELPHI AND SlJRREY THEATRES. 

With a correct illustration of one of the principal scenes, 
designed from a drawing taken in the theatre, and engraved 
by W. C. Walker. 

1837. 

LONDON : PUBLISHED BY W. STRANGE, 21, PATERNOSTER Row. 

It may at once be said that the drawing thus described is a 
version of PHIZ'S first plate, introducing Sam Weller in the 
familiar scene of cleaning boots in the Borough Inn Yard, 
where he is interviewed by PICKWICK, Wardle, and the lawyer, 
little Mr. Perker, all four characters being evidently direct 
adaptations from PHIZ'S characteristic drawing. 

Lest there should exist any misapprehension as to his share 
in the matter, or as to his dramatic intentions in the acting 
edition, W. Leman Rede has thought proper to insert the 
following 

ADVERTISEMENT. 

" It may be necessary to explain that this piece was 
originally written with the episode of the Queer Client ' 



15 

worked into it as a serious plot ; in this the talents of 
Mi's. Yates and Mr. O. Smith, and others, were employed. 
The consequence of this introduction was that the drama was 
rendered an hour too long. After the twentieth night the 
serious scenes were cut out, and the piece was played as a 
farce in the shape in which it now appears in print. The 
unfitness of the (PICKWICK) ' Papers ' for the purposes of the 
drama I believed ere I began this task, and know now. 

" This version was written when only the eighth number of 
the (Pickwick) Papers was published. At the Adelphi, and 
in Liverpool, Manchester, &c., this adaptation has been very 
favourably received, a circumstance entirely attributable to 
the fact that Messrs. Yates, Buckstone, Reeve, and Mrs. 
Fitzwilliam played the principal characters. 11 

Old Clutchley, the miser, was evidently introduced in 
favour of O. Smith ; when the " serious " business was altered 
this actor relinquished the character. 

Subjoined is the full cast of the original performances at 
the Adelphi and Surrey Theatres. 

Clutchley Mr. O. Smith. 

PICKWICK Mr. Yates. 

Snodgrass Mr. Sterling. 

Tupman Mr. Isaacs. 

JINGLE MR. BUCKSTONE. 

SAM WELLER MR. JOHN REEVE. 

Joe(fatboy) Mr. Dunn. 

Parker Mr. Jones. 

Old Weller Mr. Sanders. 

Dr. Slammer Mr. Gifford. 

Wardle Mr. Cullenford. 

Hunt (a servant) Mr. Morris. 

Waiter Mr. Young. 

Ostler Mr. Smith. 

Cabmen, Beadle, Dancers, &c., &c. 

Norah Mrs. Fitzwilliam. 

Aunt Rachel Mrs. Young. 

Emily, Bella, &c., &c. 



16 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIAN. \ 



" PICKWICK"" AT THE NEW Si RAND THEATRE. 

A more considerable hit was made at the New Strand 
Theatre, at that time a novelty, where the scribe was 
W. T. MoncrieflT, whose adaptation of the improving " Life 
in London,"" by Pierce Egan, had drawn the town on an 
unprecedented scale to witness the nocturnal belated frolics 
of Corinthian Tom, Jerry, Hawthorn, and Bob Logic. 
Stress was laid upon the engagement of " this eminent hand,"" 
as may be gathered from the announcements that the piece 
was adapted under these advantageous conditions by a piece 
of colossally impudent assumption supposed to be highly 
complimentary to the aggrieved and maltreated author of 
" PICKWICK."" 

Arranged from the celebrated PICKWICK PAPERS of the 
inimitable Bo/. 

NEW STRAND THEATRE 

(Near Somerset House.) 

On Monday, July 10th, 1837, and during the week, will 
be presented for the first time, with new and extensive 
scenery, dresses, and decorations, &c., &c., an entirely new 
peregrinating piece of incidents, characters and manners, 
interspersed with vaudevilles, called 

SAM WELLER; OR, THE PICKWICKIANS 

founded on Box's " POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK 
CLUB,"" by the author of "ToM AND JERRY." The scenery 
by Mr. Dearlove and assistants ; the music arranged by Mr. 
Collins; the dresses and decorations by Mr. Nallion, &c. 
The piece produced under the sole direction of Mr. W. J. 
HAMMOND. 

<T " If the author should be considered to have over- 
looked, or not to have perceived, any part he should have 



PICKWICK ON THE STAGE 17 

taken, he can only plead in excuse that he has been obliged 
to perform his work in the dark ! which he trusts will 
procure him pardon. 

" Late experience has enabled him to bring Mr. PICKWICK'S 
affairs to a conclusion rather sooner than his gifted biographer 
has done, if not so satisfactorily, at all events legally." 

The adaptor in his introduction, printed and given to the 
public with the published version (1837) of this presumably 
attractive piece, has a great deal more to say than was 
darkly hinted in the foregoing announcement, both concern- 
ing his personal impressions upon his own ingenuity, and, 
as it appeared to the dramatist, the ungrateful spirit in 
which his efforts had been received elsewhere, especially 
in the instance of Dickens's friendly adviser, John Forster, 
in the Examiner newspaper, strictures which had " palpably 
hit " the depredator therein aimed at by the stalwart critic 
in question. 

The following gives the cast of the version : 

SAM WELLER; OR, THE PICKWICKIANS 

A DRAMA IN THREE ACTS, 
As PERFORMED AT THE NEW STRAND THEATRE, 

With unexampled success, 
BY W. T. MONCRIEFF, ESQ. 

Member of the Dramatic Authors' Society, and Author of "The Armourer 
of Paris ! " "The Jewess ! " " The Winterbottoms ! " &c., &c., &c. 

[Here follows a neat quotation from Don Quixote, part 2, 
cap. xii.] 

LONDON : PUBLISHED FOR THE AUTHOR, AND SOLD BY ALL RESPECTABLE 
BOOKSELLERS. 

1837. 

(Price One Shilling only.) 
VOL. ir c 



18 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIAN A 

DRAMATIS PERSONS. 

MEN. 

Mr. Pickwick (founder of the Pickwick Club) Mr. A. YOUNGE. 

Augustus Snodgrass, Esq., M.P.C MR. MELVILLE. 

Tracy Tupman, Esq. (ditto) MR. E. BURTON. 

Nathaniel Winkle, Esq. (ditto) MR. ROBERTS. 

Mr. Wardle (a fine old English Gentleman) MR. G. COOKE. 

G. Nupkins, Esq. (Mayor of Ipswich) MR. CHICHELEY. 

Mr. Leo Hunter MR. NICHOLSON. 

Alfred Jingle, Esq. (a Walking Gentleman) MR. J. LEE. 

MR. SAMUEL WELLER (faithful attendant of Mr. 

Pickwick) MR.W. J.HAMMOND. 

Mr. Weller, senior (a long-Stage Coachman) MR. H. HALL. 

Job Trotter (a dubious character) MR. ATTWOOD. 

Master Joseph Dumpling ( The Fat Boy) MR. A. RICHARDSON. 

Honorable Simon Slumkey ; Horatio Fizkin, Esq. ; Rackstraw ; Dogs- 
flesh ; Canteen ; Alleycampain ; Drunken Liberal ; Ballad Singer ; 
Match Seller ; Turnkey ; Grummer ; and numerous other char- 
acters by MESSRS. DEARLOVE, BURTON, SEARLE, CHAPMAN, 
&c., &c. 

WOMEN. 

Miss Rachel Wardle (sister of Mr. Wardle) MRS. JOHNSON. 

Miss Isabella Wardle (daughter of Mr. Wardle) ... MRS. HAMMOND. 

Miss Emily Wardle (ditto) Miss DALY. 

Mrs. Bardell (a mdow) MRS. MELVILLE. 

Mrs. Leo Hunter Miss E. HAMILTON. 

Miss Tabby (keeper oj Boarding School for Young 

Ladies) MRS. H. HALL. 

Mary Summers Miss PETIFER. 

Miss Lucretia Kitchener (Miss Tabby's cook) Miss BROOKES. 

Mrs. Barclay, Boarders, Visitors, Servants, &c., &c. 

MONCRTEFF'S " ADVERTISEMENT " TO HIS PICKWICKIAN 
ADAPTATION. 

" IT is almost needless to observe that this Drama is 
founded on the very original, graphic and clever ' POSTHUMOUS 
PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB,' written by MR. DICKENS, 
better known through his familiar cognomen * Boz. 1 It will 
be quite supererogatory to point out the numerous instances 
in which I have been obliged, for the purposes of the stage, to 



PICKWICK ON THE STAGE 19 

depart from my original. As the (Pickwick) Papers are in 
everybody's hands, and the deviations speak for themselves, 
it may be sufficient to say that I have in no instance, I trust, 
departed from the spirit of my prototype, however greatly 
I may have been compelled to vary from their form and 
bearing ; and that I have endeavoured to make the quantity 
of original matter I was necessitated to write amalgamate 
not unworthily, I trust with the materials borrowed from 
Mil. DICKENS. It would have been a much more easy and 
genial task for me to have written an entirely original work, 
especially labouring, as I have been for some time past, under 
the calamity of, I hope only temporary, blindness ; but I was 
rather piqued than otherwise to the work. The (Pickwick) 
Papers have been pronounced to be wholly undramatic ; two 
very talented gentlemen, to use a newspaper term, had both 
attempted the task, and failed the one from sticking too 
closely to his original, the other through departing too 
widely from it. It struck me they were to be made dramatic. 
I knew well their author had never contemplated the pro- 
duction of them in a dramatic shape, or he would have 
formed a regular plot, and given a continuity to his work, 
which alone is wanting to rank it with the finest comic fictions 
of any age or country. 

" The success of my undertaking has justified my judgment. 
Some apology is due to MR. DICKENS for the liberty taken 
with him in finishing his work before its time ; but the great 
increase of popularity which it must have received from my 
putting it on the stage, will, I think, more than excuse a step 
to which I was urged rather by circumstances than desire. 
Some injudicious friends of MR. DICKENS, among his brethren 
of the Press (preserve me from such friends, say I of course 
I do not allude to the manly, fair-dealing daily Press, to 
which I am under the greatest obligations), have chosen to 
display much soreness at the complete manner in which I 
have triumphed over all the difficulties I had to encounter in 
my undertaking. Every wretched mongrel can, I am aware, 

c 2 



20 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

dramatise the ' Pickwick Papers'' now that I have shown 
them how, by closely copying all I have done, as is the case 
with a low minor theatre in the purlieus of London once 
respectable ; but even the original author will admit that he 
had never contemplated his matter could have been so com- 
pressed, and his incidents put in so connected a form, as they 
assume in * SAM WELLER ! ' a character, by the bye, which I 
should think was only an after-conception of its creator, and 
formed no part of his original projection. MB. DICKEXS has 
by far too much genius to nourish any of the petty feelings 
evinced by his Fostering friends ! whose articles, being those 
of the High Intellectual Sunday School of Criticism, are 
greatly too genteel and abstruse for everyday reading, but 
must be kept for Lord's day examination only ! Why these 
gentry should object to my having dramatised MR. DICKENS 
I cannot conceive. SIR WALTER SCOTT a name, I humbly 
submit, of sufficient merit to be mentioned in the same page 
with the writer of ' The Pickwick Club, 1 always looked upon 
Mr. Poeock's and Mr. Terry "s stage versions of those immortal 
fictions, ' Hob Hoy ' and ' Ivanhoe, 1 rather as a compliment 
than otherwise ; and I had undoubted precedent for what I 
did in the instance of the first dramatic writer of all time 
SHAKESPERE ! who has scarcely a play that is not founded 
on some previous drama, history, chronicle, popular tale, or 
story. What, then, means the twaddle of these 'high in- 
tellectuals ' in so pathetically condoling with MR. DICKEXS on 
the penalties he pays for his popularity in being put on the 
stage ? Let these ' high intellectuals "" speak to MR. DICKENS'S 
publishers, and they will learn it has rendered them, by 
increasing their sale, the most fortunate of Chapmen and 
dealers ! It is wasting time to show the absurdity of these 
addle-pated persons, for their ' blow hot and blow cold ' 
articles are as incomprehensible to themselves as they are to 
everybody else. In one of them I am, first of all, abused 
for having sacrilegiously meddled with any of MR. DICKENS'S 
matter, and then abused for not having meddled with it 



PICKWICK ON THE STAGE 21 

enough. The reader is told that everybody is pleased with 
my piece, and is then informed that nobody should be 
pleased with it. Two or three low scenes between SAM and 
his father, taken from the original work, are lauded as 
' written in a fine spirit of humanity ' ; while some rather 
polite dialogues that I have introduced between the ladies 
are blackguarded by this ' high intellectual ' as vulgar trash. 
MR. PICKWICK is described as ' a rare creature of the elements, 
far above my comprehension or that of any one else ; and I 
am reproached for not having delineated some delicate 
touches which, in the same sentence, are asserted to be far 
too ethereal and deeply hidden for general perception ; and 
the ' high intellectual ' winds up by asserting that the drama 
would be a very good drama if I had not happened to have 
wrought it." 

The ingenuous adaptor, in his exculpatory " advertisement " 
above quoted, thought fit to say a considerable more about his 
own merits, and at intervals refreshed himself by fresh and 
more coarsely abusive venomous onslaughts upon John 
Forster, whose hand in the Examiner had frankly attacked 
MoncriefFs fustian version according to its deserts. Fulsome 
praise, at intervals, is showered upon Dickens, the plundered 
author, but the adaptor goes out of his way to suggest that 
such admirable writers as William Clarke, Theodore Hook, 
and Thomas Hood might take example by Boz^s phenomenal 
success, and, in their turn, should favour the public with 
their " Pickwick Papers." 

We have given sufficient of MoncriefTs unabashed " ad- 
vertisement " to illustrate his engaging style of literature; it 
may be pointed out, in this place, that " the Member of the 
Dramatic Authors 1 Society," whose barefaced proceedings 
" working in the dark " gave such well-founded offence to 
Dickens, was the object of a direct onslaught, which 
apropos of this excrescence of the dramatic profession is 



22 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

introduced into "Nicholas Nickleby." " Moncrieff"" was a 
nom de plume, we are informed, the writer's real name being 
William Thomas. 

This gentleman must have recognised the uncomplimentary, 
unflattering, and candid picture of himself and his work. We 
find at Crummel's theatrical supper-party, after the stage 
performance, the dashing youthful hero Nicholas, breaking 
out into vehement denunciations against the outrageous 
doings of so-called dramatic adaptors, addressed to one of 
the most shameless members of that objectionably unscrupu- 
lous tribe, who, in the fiction, was supposed to be present in 
his professional capacity. The very sentiments set down 
by Moncrieff in his unblushing " advertisement " to his 
PICKWICKIAN piracy are there thrown in the face of the 
offender. " There was a literary gentleman present who had 
dramatised in his time two hundred and forty-seven novels, 
as fast as they had come out some of them faster than they 
had come out and was a literary gentleman in consequence. 
* What, dramatise a book ? ' said the literary gentleman ; 
' that's fame for its author. 1 " Nicholas, the high-spirited 
hero of the book, is severe on this simple-minded benefactor 
of literature, whose principles are those of the highway- 
man's. " Oh, indeed," he protests. " That's fame, sir," said the 
literary gentleman. " So Richard Turpin, Tom King, and 
Jerry Abershaw have handed down to fame the names of 
those on whom they have committed their most " impudent 
robberies?" Nicholas goes on to instance Shakespeare, as 
Moncrieff had ventured in a feebler sense to do in his 
audacious " advertisement " as the magician who had em- 
bodied traditions and stories in the magic circle of his genius 
with a direct application to the dullard capacities of the 
mongrel depredator. " You drag within the magic circle of 
your dulness subjects not at all adapted to the purposes of 
the stage, and debase as he exalted. You take the un- 
completed books of living authors fresh from their hands, wet 



PICKWICK ON THE STAGE 23 

from the press ; cut, hack, and carve them to the powers and 
capabilities of your actors and the capability of your 
theatres." These righteously indignant outbursts show 
Dickens's strong powers of smashing offenders by force of 
stinging invective, further illustrated in his " proclamation " 
against " piratical hordes " who " looted " his property, after 
the manner of the freebooting predative fraternity, sailing 
under the black flag ! 



25 




MR. W. J. HAMMOND AS " SAM WELLER." 

In the burletta of "The Pickwickians," as performed at the New Strand Theatre, 1837. 
Presented with No. 11 of "The Wonder," Sept. 2, 1837. 



27 




MR. W. J. HAMMOND AS "SAM WELLER." 

In the burletta of " The Pickwickians," as performed at the New Strand Theatre, 1837. 

" SAM. ' Vot's wery remarkable, the wery next day, at the wery time, and on the 

wery spot, the coach vo upset ! ' " 



29 




MR. J. LEE AS " ALFRED JINGLE." 

In the burletta of " The Pickwickians," as performed at the New Strand Theatre, 1837. 
" Here's tickets small sums very." 



31 




MR. H. HALL AS "MR. WELLER, SENR." 

In the burletta of " The Pickwlckians," as performed at the New Strand Theatre, 1837. 
" Werry good ; drive on, Samivel." 



33 




MR. WILLIAM ATTWOOD IN THE CHARACTER OF " JOB TROTTER." 
In the burletta of " Sam Waller ; or, The Pickwickians," as performed at the New Strand 

Theatre. 

" Attwood's 'Job Trotter,' in Moncrieff's version of 'The Pickwickians,' is the very 
man cut from the illustrations of the book and called into life." Times. August 8, 1837. 



VOL. II 



- ,t5-- ^ 

W : itl^-^- VK^-^S 




Frontispiece to dramatised version of the Trial Scene in " Pickwick. 



"BOS" PIRACIES 



"BOS" PIRACIES. 

" THE PENNY PICKWICK," &c. 

SMALL libraries of " pirated " versions of the works of the 
immortal "Boz" all of a coarse nature, both as to the 
literary attempts, the wood-cut engravings, and the typo- 
graphical aspects were in succession brought out by E. L. 
Llcyd, 62 Broad Street, Bloomsbury, much to the dis- 
pleasure, it may be believed, of Dickens and his publishers. 

All these plagiarisms were issued as undisguised " colour- 
able imitations " as shortly as possible after the appearance 
of Dickens's original parts ; the form chosen for the series 
was founded on the first member of this piratical band, de- 
scribed as " The Penny Pickwick," by " Bos," illustrated with 
roughly engraved wood-cuts, " in Weekly Numbers at One 
Penny, and Monthly Parts at Fourpence, with Comic Engrav- 
ings." (In 112 Numbers. One wood-cut to every four pages.) 

" Pickwick in America," by " Bos," with engravings by 
" PHIS," followed the same order. (In 44 Numbers. One 
wood-cut to every eight pages.) The illegitimate perquisites 
brought by the series were too tempting to be lightly re- 
linquished, and the pirated versions were thus extended. 

" ' Posthumous Papers of the Cadgers' Club,' price One 
Shilling, containing 16 engravings and 94 pages of closely 
printed letter-press." (In 10 Numbers.) 

" The Posthumous Papers of the Wonderful Discovery 
Club, formerly of Camden Town. Established by Sir Peter 
Patson. With eleven illustrations designed by ' Squib ' and 
engraved by Point.' 1838." 

" ' Lloyd's Everlasting Entertainments ; or, Pickwickian 
Shadows.' Price only One Penny ; three sorts." 



40 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

" The Sketch Book by ' Bos ' (a coarse imitation or 
travesty of " Sketches by Boz "), in Penny Numbers and 
Fourpenny Parts, with Splendid Engravings, or complete in 
12 Numbers, containing Seventeen Superior Engravings, price 
One Shilling." 

In their turn " Oliver Twist," " Nicholas Nickleby," &c., 
upon their respective appearances in monthly parts, were 
subjected to similar indignities in the piratical and plagiarised 
" Oliver Twiss," by " Bos," " Nickelas Nickelbery," by " Bos," 
&c., published under precisely similar auspices. 

Our present concern is with imitations, piracies, and plagi- 
arisms of the " Pickwick Papers," as issued contemporaneously 
with the original editions. Foremost among these spurious 
productions comes the " Bos " series, the generally responsible 
offices of editor, proprietor, printer, and publisher being 
apparently combined in one individual, who can hardly have 
enjoyed Dickens's good- will. 

It may be interesting to set down the daring pretensions 
of this Cerberus-headed " pirate bold " as unfolded in the first 
base attempt, the plagiarised Pickwick. 

The apology we offer for reprinting these extraordinary 
" Prefaces " and " Dedications," is that their amazing 
effrontery is more amusing than the vulgarities of the text, 
so-called ; nor can the cool audacity of " Bos's " final plea be 
surpassed, when that ingenious " editor " condescended, in the 
last paragraph of his " Dedication," to casually allude to his 
own plagiaristic delinquencies. Such colossal impudence is 
noteworthy ! 

General title-page to the completed work : 

THE POST-HUMOUROUS NOTES 

OF THE 

PICKWICKIAN CLUB. 

EDITED BY "BOS." 

Vol. i. "Illustrated with 120 Engravings." 1 
Vol. ii. "Illustrated with 200 Engravings." 

1 According to the statement on the title-pages, but not to actual facts. 



"BOS" PIRACIES 41 

The parts appeared in a pictorial wrapper, further used for 
the frontispieces, here reproduced as a curiosity ; strange to 
say, the wood-cut design has been praised for its ingenuity ; 
an advertisement on the coloured wrapper sets forth : 

PART 1. PRICE 4o. 

THE PENNY PICKWICK, 

CONTAINING THE 

HUMOROUS ADVENTURES 

OF 

CHRISTOPHER PICKWICK, ESQ., PERCY TUPNALL, ESQ., 
ARTHUR SNODGREEN, ESQ., MATTHEW WINKLETOP, ESQ., 

&c., &c. 

EDITED BY BOS 

WITH EIGHT ENGRAVINGS. 

Vol. I. contains 432 pages (with two wood-cuts to every 
eight pages) or 54 parts. Vol. II. (58 parts) contains 452 
pages. It must be mentioned that the same wood-cuts 
were used in both works (" Penny Pickwick " and " Pickwick 
in America' 1 ), in several instances indifferently and utterly 
regardless of the context. 

DEDICATION (VoL. I.). 

"To THE MOST LAUGHTER-LOVING 

THE 50,000 SUBSCRIBERS TO THIS 

Publication, the Perils, Adventures, Philosophical Re- 
searches, and Important Papers of the all-illustrious 
Christopher Pickwick, Esq., and his learned colleagues, 
are dedicated by their much obliged and ever faithful 
servants, 

" THE EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR. 
" At our Office 

" BKOAD STREET, BLOOMSBUKY." 



42 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

PREFACE TO VOL. I. 

" UPON arriving at the termination of this, the first 
portion of our Pickwickian journey, we deem it a duty 
incumbent upon us to say a few words in expression of our 
gratitude to the many thousands who have so cheerfully 
travelled with us, not only that they may see that we have 
a proper sense of their patronage and friendship, but that 
they may also be induced to accompany us in the remainder 
of our mirthful career. 

" Upon the appearance of those shilling Publications 
which have been productive of so much mirth and amuse- 
ment, it occurred to us that, while the wealthier classes had 
their Momus, the poor man should not be debarred from 
possessing to himself as lively a source of entertainment and 
at a price consistent with his means ; we therefore took upon 
ourselves that arduous but cheerful task, and, at an immense 
risk, sent forth our little volume to the Public. Spite of all 
the endeavours of petty dunderheads to rob us of our good 
name, and to prejudice the Public against us, notwith- 
standing they have tried all that their puny intellects (?) 
could concoct to crush us, there cannot be a greater proof 
of the utter uselessness of their miserable attempts, and of 
our own glorious triumph than in the fact that the present 
Weekly Sale of the Penny Pickwick 'w 50,000 ! 

" This is a truth unprecedented in the annals of cheap 
periodicals ; and we can say, without egotism, that we feel 
confident that we have not been undeserving the support we 
have met with. The pages of the PENNY PICKWICK have 
never been polluted with a sentence that could cause a blush 
upon the cheek of modesty, and although we acknowledge 
that we have at times been rather extravagant (as all 
caricaturists must be), our extravagance has never been 
characterized by vulgarity, and its sole aim has been to 
create a broad grin on the face of care. 



"J3OS" PIRACIES 43 

" It has been reported, by persons who no doubt have an 
interest in fabricating a statement of the sort, that the 
PENNY PICKWICK would be complete at the end of the First 
Volume ; this it is almost unnecessary for us to deny, as it is 
well known that it still appears regularly every week, and 
will continue to do so while our dearly beloved friends the 
Public think it meet to bestow their patronage upon us so 
largely. Until they are tired of laughing at us, we most 
assuredly shall not grow tired of labouring, as far as in us 
lies to provide them food for mirth, and can assure them 
that we have still Pickwickian documents by us that will 
furnish an almost inexhaustible source of amusement. In 
addition to this, we have had the honour conferred upon us 
to be deputed the detailers of the extraordinary adventures 
of MR. PICKWICK IN AMERICA, which the admirers of that 
illustrious individual will be able to procure with the 
PENNY PICKWICK regularly every week ! 

" With many thanks for past favours, and trusting that we 
may be found worthy of a continuance of them, we 

" Are the Public's 

"Devoted Servant, 

" Bos. 
" Rose Cottage, St. John's Wood." 

PREFACE TO VOL. II. 

" OUR mighty task is now completed ; the immortal and 
never-dying Annals of the illustrious PICKWICK, and his no 
less distinguished colleagues and companions are finished ! 
the renowned history which for nearly two years and a half 
has convulsed the whole world with laughter, is brought to 
a conclusion, but not till the end of time will the mirth- 
provoking and extraordinary adventures recorded in these 
pages be forgotten. 

" Reader, we will not ask you whether you have been 



44 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

satisfied ; the unprecedented patronage you have bestowed 
upon this work is a sufficient proof that you have not only 
been gratified, but delighted. What must then be our 
pleasure who have had the glory and honour of transmitting 
these spirit-stirring incidents to posterity ? We cannot do 
justice to our feelings, nor shall we seek to express them, 
inasmuch as we consider the amusement we have thus placed 
in the means of the most humble, is more than repaying the 
debt of gratitude we owe for the approbation extended to us 
by the public. 

" Gentle readers, thanking you sincerely for the kindness 
with which you have received our hero, and the manner in 
which you have condescended to laugh at our singular 
adventures, receive our cordial farewell and blessing. 

" Bos." 

DEDICATION 

" To his best and kindest friends, the Public, ' Bos "* begs 
leave to dedicate these chronicles : and sincerely thanks them 
for having laughed with him throughout so many months, 
and though they may not illustrate the common saying of 
* laugh and grow fat, 1 he trusts that they have lost nothing 
by the perusal of the adventures of the illustrious 
PICKWICKIANS. 

" The chronicler does not deem any apology at all neces- 
sary, now that his task is completed, and the voice of public 
approval convinces him that he has not done that task 
indifferently ; but, if it be urged that he has intruded on 
the ground of another, he humbly submits, that every author 
has a right to take a popular subject, and, as he has used 
none other but his oivn materials, he does not fear but that 
an impartial jury, instead of considering that he has wilfully 
murdered the subject, will return a verdict of justifiable 
homicide. 

" Bos." 



PART 20- 



PKKJVY 



inJMOBOVS ADVESTITRES 



CHRISTOPHER PICKWICK 

ARTHUR SNODGREEN. 



MATTHEW WINKLETOP, 

EDITED BY BOS fl 



PUBLISHED BV E LLOVD. 44 WYCU-STIIEET 

AND SOt.n OV AIL KOOKV- U.KRS. 




Woodcut design used on the wrapper of the pirated " Penny Pickwick " and forming the title-page. 



THE PENN V 




CHAP. I. 

THE F.r.ADER INTRODUCED TO THE P1TK- 
\VICKIANS-IIR. PICKWICK'S ELOQUENT 
SPEECH. 

Previous to the year 1817, the science of 
this sublunary world was of that narrow 
and circumscribed description, tliat it 
might be looked upon merely as a small 
rushlight, glimmering ia a dark lantern, 
shedding but a dickering beam upon the 
illiterate inhabitants. It rested with one 
min t.o dissipate that dulness to open 
the channels of human knowledge to ex- 
pand the rushlight of intellectual research 
No. 1. 



info the full blaze an I overwhelming brjfei 
ii-.ncy oi lite gas-light of wisdom, and to 
hand down a name to future generations, 
that must completely efface that of Sir lease 
Newton, and many other tolerable philoso- 
phers from the buok of memory. 

The "Light of other dajs," faded 
away, the lanterns of the Charlies of 
the night were exlinguisl ed ; to tlxm 
succeeded the bull's eyes of the Peelers; 
the gas blazed in every shop window 
upon every lamp post nay it even 
extended its effulgent rays from the gia 
palace to the church eteeplc aod from 



Specimen page of First Number. 



BOS' 1 PIRACIES 49 



" PICKWICK IN AMERICA" 

" Pickwick in America " of which we have reproduced the 
wrapper design, as engraved on wood, and the first page, with 
its engraving of the Pickwickians in council over the project of 
their contemplated American tour was produced under the 
same auspices as the " Penny Pickwick," and made its appear- 
ance simultaneously with the isisue of the commencement of 
the second volume of that spurious fabrication. As has been 
mentioned, the work in question was produced in weekly 
penny numbers and fourpenny monthly parts. There are 
forty-four monthly numbers, but, with a view to further 
profit, the number of wood-cut illustrations, evidently the 
most expensive part of the production, was reduced by half; 
thus, while the " Penny Pickwick " offered its readers two 
wood-cuts to every eight pages, the version of " Pickwick in 
America" gave but one block to the same number of pages. 
As has been stated, the publisher effected a further saving by 
occasionally making the same blocks serve for both works 
indifferently, with perplexing results : the " Penny Pickwick " 
illustrations appeared in the American adventures, and, even 
more surprising, the American " specialities " with plenty of 
" Darkies " eked out the concluding portion of the " Penny 
Pickwick." 

The title-page of this edifying work is as follows : 



VOL. n 



PICKWICK IN AMERICA! 

DETAILING ALL THK REMARKABLE ADVENTURES OF THAT 

ILLUSTRIOUS INDIVIDUAL, AND HIS LEARNED COMPANIONS 

IN THE UNITED STATES. 

EXTRAORDINARY JONATHANISMS COLLECTED BY MR. SNODGRASS, 

AND 

THE SAYINGS, DOINGS, AND MEMS 

OF 

THE FACETIOUS SAM WELLER. 



EDITED BY "BOS." 



ILLUSTRATED BY FORTY-SIX FINE ENGRAVINGS. 



LONDON : 

PRINTED AND ITULIPHED UY E. LLOYD, 62 BROAD STREET, 
BLOOMSBURY. 



As in the instance of its predecessor, the " Penny Pick- 
wick," the editor has exhausted his originality, and borrowed 
characters and situations freely from the " Pickwick Papers " 
with a reckless coolness of appropriation unaccountable in our 
days of "Copyright Laws" and legal restrictions. 



"BOS" PIRACIES 51 

The preface is brief and less entertainingly impudent than 
in the instance of the " Penny Pickwick " already given. 

PREFACE 

" Ladies and Gentlemen, who have so liberally con- 
descended to laugh through the adventures of the renowned 
Mr. Pickwick, and his no less renowned colleagues, in the 
UNITED STATES, 'Bos' requests of you to join him in a fare- 
well ebullition of mirth upon the happy occasion of those 
worthy scions of Momus being once more united to you in 
Good Old England ; trusting that no longer in America, 
you will find them in A merry key, in this their Native Soil ! 
The Editor is certain that, although the illustrious Pick- 
wickians have been abroad, you have all ever found them, 
and will continue long to find them at home! The eager- 
ness with which you have come forward to purchase their 
doings and sayings, assures him that his task has been a 
grateful one, and he is happy in having achieved his duty so 
much to your satisfaction. 

" With many acknowledgments for the flattering manner 
in which you have patronised his exertions to make public 
the extraordinary adventures of this ever remarkable Club, 
the Editor begs leave most respectfully to subscribe himself, 

" The Public's Grateful Servant, 

Bos." 

The spurious " Bos," it has been seen, while admitting that 
he had " intruded on the ground of another," asserted that as 
an author he had a right to help himself to a popular subject, 
but professed boldly " that he had used none other but his 
own materials.''' 1 As an example of the " originality " claimed 
for this extraordinary plagiarism, we give just a specimen 
paragraph from the real " Box," placed beside a similar para- 
graph from his piratical imitator, selected from " Pickwick in 
America." 



52 



PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 



SAM WELLKII AXD THK PRETTY HOUSEMAID SHAKING AND 
FOLDING CARPETS 



DICKENS'S "PICKWICK 
PAPERS " 

" It is not half as innocent 
a thing as it looks, that shak- 
ing little pieces of carpet at 
least, there may be no great 
harm in the shaking, but the 
folding is a very insidious 
process. So long as the shak- 
ing lasts, and the two parties 
are kept the carpet's length 
apart, it is as innocent an 
amusement as can well be de- 
vised ; but when the folding 
begins, and the distance be- 
tween them gets gradually 
lessened from one-half its 
former length to a quarter, 
and then to an eighth, and 
then to a sixteenth, and then 
to a thirty-second, if the car- 
pet be long enough : it be- 
comes dangerous. We do not 
know, to a nicety, how many 
pieces of carpet were folded 
in this instance, but we can 
venture to state that, as many 
pieces as there were, so many 
times did Sam kiss the pretty 
housemaid. 11 



"PICKWICK IN AMERICA" 
(PLAGIARISED VERSION) 

" Simple and innocent as it 
may appear to some persons, 
there is something more in- 
sidious in the process of shak- 
ing carpets, when the actors 
in it are a male and a female, 
than may be conceived by 
persons who have not devoted 
much attention to these mat- 
ters. At least, although the 
shaking may not be very dan- 
gerous, as the two persons so 
engaged are kept a respectful 
distance from each other while 
that lasts, but when it comes 
to the folding of the said 
carpet or carpets, there the 
simplicity and innocence gra- 
dually diminishes with the 
length of the carpets, and as 
the parties get drawn closer 
together. So it happened with 
Mr. Weller and the handsome 
maid upon the occasion of 
which we are writing, and we 
can venture to assert, that as 
many pieces of carpet as were 
shook and folded, so many 
times did the lips of Sam 
Weller and his pretty com- 
panion meet together."" 



"BOS" PIRACIES 53 

DICKENS ON PIRACIES OF " PICKWICK " 

It may be enquired how these impudent, unblushing thefts 
affected Dickens ? On the whole " Boz " bore with tolerable 
equanimity these dreadful perversions of his own works, 
which replaced what was youthful hilarity and the effer- 
vescence of high spirits in " Pickwick " by low-bred horseplay 
and downright bathos. All that was vivacious in Dickens 
became irreclaimably vulgar in the imitations. Doubtless " the 
Inimitable " was badly hurt by the distressing and obviously 
hopeless coarseness of these plagiarisms, and in private prob- 
ably delivered his vexed soul thereon with unmistakable 
directness and emphasis. For instance, he was found writing 
to his friendly adviser John Forster from Broadstairs, on 
7th September, 1837, concerning one of the many piracies of 
" PICKWICK," the marauder of which had distinguished himself 
beyond the rest of the piratical horde by a preface abusive of 
the unfortunate writer plundered, and whose best characters 
and situations were maimed and maltreated by this malefac- 
tor : " I recollect," wrote ' Bo/, 1 " this ' member of the Drama- 
tic Authors 1 Society ' bringing an action once against Chap- 
man, who rented the City Theatre, in which it was proved 
that he had undertaken to write under special agreement 
seven melodramas for five pounds, to enable him to do which a 
room had been hired in a gin-shop close by. The defendant's 
plea was that the plaintiff' was always drunk, and had not 
fulfilled his contract. Well, if the ' PICKWICK ' has been the 
means of putting a few shillings in the vermin-eaten pockets of 
so miserable a creature, and has saved him from a workhouse 
or jail, let him empty out his little pot of filth, and welcome. 
I am quite content to have been the means of relieving him. 
Besides, he seems to have suffered by agreements." l 

1 The concluding allusion was a grimly playful reference to the sufferings 
Dickens himself had recently undergone, owing to certain agreements 
into which he had incautiously entered, before his writings became famous ; 
engagements entailing heavy penalties and sacrifices, both in purse, and 
in mental wear and tear, before the novelist, aided by the business-like 
acumen of his friend John Forster, was enabled to effect his release from 
the hands of the despoilers and hard task-masters in question. 




Published by E. Lloyd, 62 Broad Street, Bloomsbury. 
Wrapper and Frontispiece to the pirated "Pickwick in America." 



IN 



AMERICA. 




Mr. Pickwick informing his friends rfhis intended trip to America. 



CHAP. I. 

A STATEMENT OF THE REASONS THA'T 
INDUCED MR. PICKWICK. AFTER 
.T1IK .LAPSE OF FOUR YEARS, TO 
BREAK FROM HIS RETIREMENT AT 
OULW1C1I, AND TO RESOLVE TO 
UNDERTAKE ONE OF' TUB MOST 
PERILOUS VOYAGES IT WAS EVER 
HIS FATE TO FIGURE IN. A BRIEF 
HISTORY OF THE DOMESTIC EELI- 
CITY OF MR. SAMUEL WELLER. 

No.l. 



HIS KOBLK RESOLUTION, AND SAA- 
CIOUS OPINIONS OF THE PROJECTED 
ADVENTURES. OLD FRIENDS ONCR 
MORE BROUGHT UPON THE STAKE 
OF THIS REMARKABLE HISTORY. 

IT was on one of the most beautiful 
mornings that ever the month of June 
produced, when the air was filled with 
the fragrance of innumerable flowers, 
and the cheeks of every pedestrian were 
m a most felicitous state of perspiration, 
resembling so many delicate nvmp- 



Spcoirnen page of First Number. 



PICKWICK ABROAD ; OR, THE TOUR IN FRANCE 
Bv G. W. M. REYNOLDS 

Author of "The Modern Literature of France," " Alfred de Rosann," &c. 

THE most important of the plagiaristic so-called "con- 
tinuations " of the ' Pickwick Papers " was the production of 
G. W. M. Reynolds, author of several improving works, 
a novelist who was at that time largely interested in 
everything French, and had more particularly resided in 
Paris, where he claimed to have spent ten years anterior to 
the appearance of " Pickwick Abroad "" in the Monthly 
Magazine, at that time carried on under his editorship. In 
this performance the enterprising George W. M. Reynolds 
was assisted, at the start, by the artistic collaboration of his 
friend, Alfred Crowquill, who had already realised the advan- 
tages to be secured by timely working the " Pickwick " mine 
of wealth and fame, producing " without your leave " month 
by month, and also bi-monthly, forty successive plates of 
" Pickwick " illustrations contemporaneously with the pub- 
lication of the original work, on its first issue in monthly 
parts ; thus, while the initial issue of the " Pickwick Papers " 
appeared in twenty parts, Crowquill had produced two 
octavo plates, filled with " Pickwickian " characters and 
incidents, portrayed according to that artist's theories, for 
the extra-illustration of each successive number directly it 
made its appearance. Of his capabilities for the post to 
which Crowquill aspired, the forty octavo plates of illus- 
trations, which appeared as described, are evidence in point ; 
this series is reproduced in our first volume. It must be 
added that Alfred Crowquill as an aspiring youth of parts 



60 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

lilled with literary and artistic ambitions, and enjoying con- 
siderable popularity in his own generation had formed one 
of the little group of "likely hands,"" who were ready and 
willing to write up to Seymour's designs, and to furnish forth 
the narrative framework to connect those suites of sporting 
delineations which were popularly recognised as " Seymour's 
Sketches." In his artistic capacity, Crowquill was equally 
solicitous of being employed as the " Pickwick " designer. 
Failing to secure the post of " chorus " to the pictures of the 
original " Nimrod Club," as projected by the ill-starred 
Seymour, Crowquill was commissioned to write up to that 
fertile artist's more extensive series of earlier designs, sporting 
comicalities, subsequently collected in one series, and sent 
forth to the world as " Seymour's Sketches." It is fair to infer 
that the " Nimrod Club " under Crowquill's editorship would 
have resembled the " Seymour Sketches " later issued under 
similar auspices, and have excited no more interest in the 
world of letters than did the suite to which Crow-quill's name 
is attached. " Boz," with his original genius, carried the 
public by storm, and, as was the reasonable procedure, the 
pictures were distinctly subordinated to the literature ; the 
mediocre talents of Crowquill only succeeded in accomplishing 
the narrower purpose of the publishers ; small interest was 
excited in his letter-press, and his versions never arrived at 
the glory of bewitching the wide world, as was the fortune of 
" that lucky fellow Bo/.' " 

The passing reputation which Alfred Forrester, as " Crow- 
quill," had secured by his temerity in rushing in, as an 
unsolicited and " free-lance " recorder of his artistic impres- 
sions of the " Pickwick Papers " in 1836 and 1837, doubtless 
in a measure emboldened him to make further and more 
extended incursions into Dickens's domain, and amongst the 
PKRSOXAI.IA of the "Pickwickian" cohort. 

Probably the collaboration of a year later when the 
plagiaristic " Pickwick Abroad" made its first appearance in 
the old Monthly Magazine was largely due, as to its in- 



"PICKWICK ABROAD" 61 

ception, to " the illustrator 11 ; the piracy thus far, and in 
this respect only, resembling its prototype and illustrious 
predecessor, of which it claimed to be the sequel. Crowquill 
began with spirit, but, as the story-teller got his subject in 
hand, the growing interest of the narrative somewhat dis- 
counted the importance at first attaching to the pictorial 
embellishments. At all events, it is clear, from the " pro- 
gramme " set forth by the author, that considerable conse- 
quence was at first attached to the etched steel plates by 
Crowquill, but this confidence was not enduring, for, as 
the parts " caught on " and the narrative expanded, before 
the work was half published the task of illustrating Reynolds'^ 
text was entrusted to another hand, John Phillips. Thus, 
after the course of " Pickwick Abroad " running through the 
pages of the old Monthly, as at that time under G. W. M. 
Reynolds'^ editorship, the monthly parts, of thirty-two pages, 
beginning January, 1839, made their appearance in a charac- 
teristic pictorial wrapper drawn on wood by Alfred Crowquill ; 
and, later on, the complete work, in one stout volume (628 
pages), was issued, with a preface by George W. M. Reynolds, 
dated August, 1839 ; advertised as illustrated with forty-one 
steel engravings by Alfred Crowquill and John Phillips, and 
with thirty-three wood-cuts by Bonner. 

The " opinions of the press " during the original develop- 
ment of " Pickwick Abroad " in the old Monthly Magazine 
were various, but on the whole fairly complimentary ; the Pick- 
wickian " Tour in France " was described as " a very respect- 
able continuation of the original," Morning Advertiser, 
April 5, 1838 ; the Weekly Dispatch averred that " the 
author has hit off' much of the original humour of ' Boz, 1 and 
shows what Mr. Pickwick would have been had his courage 
led him to encounter the perils of travelling the continent." 

Another paper remarks, in opposition to certain unfavour- 
able animadversions : " The author, Mr. Reynolds, makes no 
concealment of his name. He professes no piracy, and if he 
can creditably amuse the public by spiritedly carrying on the 



62 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

Pickwick fancy as it may please himself, he will only add to 
the fame of hit eminent original) without detracting from 
hi* own. . . . The embellishments are in Crowquill's best 
style." 

The Naval and Military Gazette gave an equally en- 
couraging notice : " Whatever may be the legitimate ' right 
and title of Mr. Reynolds to assume the mantle of Master 
' Bo/,' we are bound to confess it hangs gracefully on his 
shoulders. For our own part, we never should have thought 
of going 'abroad" 1 in quest of Pickwickian adventures; but, 
whether ' abroad or at home, Mr. R. has done precisely 
what we should have done, had we been requested to fabricate 
a Pickwickian drama for one of her Majesty's theatres. 
Instead of exhibiting the original at second-hand, and in a 
mutilated form, he has introduced us to scenes altogether 
novel and extraordinary ; and, not contented with merely 
presenting old acquaintances in new situations, he has brought 
forward new characters as strikingly mi generis as any that 
' Bo/ ' himself has produced. Thus ' Pickwick in France ' has 
all the individuality and raciness of an original conception. 
Mr. Reynolds has an able coadjutor in Alfred Crowquill, 
whose sketches are full of life and spirit." 

The most complimentary paragraph appeared in the Dublin 
Pilot : " Since ' Box ' has ceased to delight us by a periodical 
issue of humour and truth, we have met with nothing so 
amusing as the continuation of the adventures of his heroes 
under the title of ' Pickwick Abroad.' If the name of 
G. W. M. Reynolds did not stand upon the title-page, we 
should be induced to believe that the identical Cid Hamet 
Benengili, who introduced us to the immortal Club, had 
taken up his pen again to chronicle some more of their 
sayings and doings. All who feel anxious for the future 
fortunes of the Pickwickians must seek information of their 
whereabouts from those pleasant sketches." 

"'Pickwick Abroad,' wrote the Observer, "continues its 
delineations of character and recital of droll and amusing 



63 

incidents. By conveying the coterie to France the author 
has secured that new and vast theatre for the display of their 
peculiar oddities, and an opportunity of contrasting in a 
mirthful way the notions and manners of the rival nations." 

Although acknowledging that his work was built on 
another man's foundation, in his preface the author con- 
gratulates himself upon the success of his venture ; all the 
world had read the adventures of Mr. Pickwick in England, 
and the public were eager to learn more about the ultimate 
proceedings of the immortal Club. 

Reynolds has treated his readers to a scrap of interesting 
" Pickwick " bibliography : 

" Many other works, in a similar strain, and advertised to 
be published in a similar form, were issued from the press at 
about the same time ; but, in spite of the announcement 
' that they were to be completed in twenty numbers, 1 they 
died of pure inanition one after another. A partial feeling 
of satisfaction and pride cannot therefore be blamed in the 
author of * Pickwick Abroad,' when he contemplates the 
successful termination of his labours in the twenty parts to 
which no other imitator of the ' immortal Boz ' has yet 
attained." 

Like Dickens's own revival of the personalia of his " Pick- 
wick Club " in the opening chapters of " Master Humphrey's 
Clock," the author of the Pickwickian adventures in France 
has deliberately set himself the task of reintroducing the 
familiar coterie, under the conception that there were readers 
innumerable who were still warmly interested in the Pick- 
wickian worthies, and willing to welcome the reappearance of 
those old friends on whom the curtain had descended, all too 
soon for many tastes, at the close of the " Pickwick Papers," 
universally relished. 

As germane to our subject of "Pickwick" imitators and 
" continuations " so styled, it is felt that Reynolds's " Argu- 
ment," prefaced to his opening chapter of this alleged 
" continuation," will be interesting in this connection. 



64 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

Preface affixed to the first appearance of Part I. of " Pickwick 

Abroad " in the Monthly Magazine, Edited by 

G. W. M. Reynolds. 

PICKWICK ABROAD; 

OR, 

THE Touu IN FUAXCE. 

A series of Papers compiled from the private notes and 
memoranda of Samuel Pickwick, Esq. 

"To THE READER 

"The 'immortal Bo/' has done so much to render the 
public familiar with the characters and adventures of some 
of the most remarkable men of the present day viz., Mr. 
Pickwick and his followers that it is only with extreme 
diffidence a new historian has ventured to continue the lives 
of those extraordinary individuals. But short and to the 
purpose be the introduction to these Memoirs. 

" A few months ago I called upon MR. PICKWICK at his 
house in Dulwich ; and from certain circumstances such as 
the appearance of a number of trunks and parcels in the hall, 
each bearing a lalx?! with the following words marked upon 
it, ' Mon.v'uiir, Mom'mir PICKWICK, Voyageur de Paris a 
Londre.f^ I immediately inferred that the object of my visit 
was just returned from a continental tour. Nor was I 
mistaken in my supposition. The founder of the ' Pickwick 
Club," which now exists no longer, had violated the promise 
he had some time since made to himself, and had voluntarily 
deviated from that tranquil mode of life it was his intention 
to adopt when his first biographer, ' Box, 1 took leave of him. 
In fact, he had, with that noble disregard for danger and 
difficulty, and that spirit of enterprise and perseverance, which 



"PICKWICK ABROAD" 65 

formed such prominent traits in the character of this extra- 
ordinary man, undertaken a journey to Paris had actually 
resided some time in the sovereign city of France and, 
reckless of fatigue, had retraced his steps at the termination 
of a certain period, by means of diligence, steam-packet, and 
coach, to his classic abode at Dulwich. 

" Without fatiguing the reader with an elaborate descrip- 
tion of the astonishment I naturally experienced at the 
boldness of this idea, the certainty that it had been followed 
up, and the uncompromising courage of him who had carried 
it into effect an idea that prompted him to leave his own 
fireside and risk the perils of the ocean, the chance of being 
overturned in a diligence, and the probability of finding himself 
in a nation of anthropophagi in the guise of human beings 
without dwelling on this subject, fearful lest the eulogies 
I offer to my friend might be deemed the dictates of 
partiality and blind adoration I shall merely state that the 
note-book, and the memoranda of the illustrious Pickwick 
were placed at my disposal, and that it has become my 
happy fate to succeed the no less immortal ' Boz "* as the 
biographer of one of the most extraordinary men the present 
or any other age has produced. 

" In order to do meet justice to the memory of the 
individual whose adventures I am called upon to relate, I 
have associated with me in the delightful, though somewhat 
difficult task, my friend ALFRED CROWQUILL. It is mine to 
edit, and his to illustrate ; the biographical memoirs of which 
I now present the First Part to the reader, and which, 
according to minutest calculation, will afford sufficient 
materials to enable me to continue the sketches through 
twenty numbers of the Monthly Magazine. 

" In conclusion, gentle reader, allow me to remark that if 
the talented ' Boz ' have not chosen to enact the part of 
Mr. Pickwick's biographer in his continental tour it is not 
my fault. The field was open to him who had so well and 
so successfully traced the progress of that great man during 

VOL. II F 



66 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

his travels in England ; and as it is now my destiny to 
compile and put in order the notes taken by him abroad, and 
reduce them to a systematic narrative, I cannot do otherwise 
than pledge myself for the sincerity and impartiality with 
which I shall present each Number of that important work to 
the public."" 



THE TOUB in FRANCE; 



G. W.M.REYNOLDS. 

ILLUSTRATED WITH 

TWO STEEL ENGRAVINGS 
J3j> aifrrt Cretovifll. 



LONDON : SHERWOOD & CO 




S.iid by Heywood, Oldham Street, Manchester ; W. Cooper, and J. Manscll, Union Street, 
r.'.rminKham ; Smith, Scotland Place, Liverpool; W. Hickling, and Weathcriit, Coventry; 
Thorley, Bath; and W. H, Smith, Crescent, Cambridge. Also byTcgj; and Co., Dublin; Griffin 
a:jj Co., Glasgow, 



PART III. 



JULY. 

,\ *= 



PAIOE Qd, 









LONDON: 
WILLOUGHBY & CO., 8, AMEN CORNER, PATERNOSTER ROW; 

AND ALL BOOKSELLEKS. 




1 'MIDST PLEASURES AND PALACES THO' WE MAY ROAM, 
BE IT EVER SO HUMBLE, THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME." 

Popular Sony. 
London. 
Title-page to "Pickwick Abroad.' 



THE PICKWICK GAZETTE 

("A WEEKLY REGISTER OF THE PICKWICKIAN PROCEEDINGS") 
No. 3. Published July 1, 1837. 

[A sheet of 4 pages (13 x 10).] 

The headline of title, and illustrations by 
ROBERT CRUIKSHANK. 

The nature of this avowedly Pickwickian organ, true to its 
advertised intentions, may be gathered from the contents of 
No. 3, consisting of four pages. Page 1 has been reproduced 
in facsimile on a smaller scale. 

ODE TO QUEEN VICTORIA BY MR. WINKLE. 

MR. PICKWICK'S VISIT TO QUEEN VICTORIA. 

SAM WELLER'S HINTS ON ETIQUETTE. 

PICKWICK AT THE (QUEEN'S) PROCLAMATION 

(Her Majesty's Proclamation at Temple Bar, the gate of the 

City.) 

SAM WELLER'S ADVICE TO SIR JOHN CONROY. 

PICKWICKIAN THEATRICALS 
(Sam Welter's Notes, and Tupman on the Strand Theatre). 




Bos in lingua. LATIN GKAHVAK. 



SATUHDAY, JULY 1, 1837. 




KB. PICKWICK AT THE COFFEE-SHOP. 

(a. y. i.) 

So great has been the Bensation excited in the public mind by the 
tppearance of a weekly register of the Pickwickian proceedings, that 
something less than TWO MILLION copies of the " Pickwick Gazette" 
have already been circulated. Deeply impressed with the power of 
public admiration, and grateful for the interest shown in the result of 
their labours, the managers of the publication have thought it not 
unwise to evince their gratitude in return, by empowering Mr. 




Ma. PICK-WICK'S ESCAPE FROM TBE OOFFEE-&BOF. 

(&> A'o. 1.) 

Robert Cruikshank, an artist witty, if not too wise, to illustrate that 
number ; and the two engravings which ornament the present page, 
art, we trust, sufficient evidence of the skill and humonr with which 
he has applied himself to the pleasing task. Encouraged by public 
sympathy and public praise, tie Pickwickians will proceed in their 
labours, improving their " Gazette" in quality as it increases in ill 
circulation. 



Vol.1 



}. Andrews, lloljwcll-itrect, Strand. 



The Pickwick Gazette, reduced from the original sheet, 13 x 10. 
Published June and July, 1837. 




PART II. 


The Mummy 


Absenco of Mimf. 


The Pitkwlck.Ago 


Lady Alda's Dre ant 


Jigaree 


Teddy Malonc 


Hev forOM Bncclius 


I'm Queen ofa Fairy .Baml 


Haupy Days 
I Wonder if llc'i Single 


Thc Wine Cub 
The Raccoon 


Modcr Natur make a W.irM 
A Jew hath the Heart da Man 


The War Cry Is.Soundjng 
A Night's Pleasure 


Kattv I.ooncv. 


Tyrolean Echo Song 


Single Younif Man Lodger., 


rhc Normandy MaUL 


H who can't my meaning bpy 


Fell llcveticn 


Bi'l Jones 


Days pone By 


Celebrated Ouartetut 


Clar dc Kitchin 


Shepherd'* livening Bell 


The Veteran to his Sflfl 


Fair Genevieve 


Sam Weller's Review of Con. 


Ladies of our Native Land. 


err K Son trs, and Singers 3. 


Exile's Farewell 


Notice to Correspondents 


Jessy on a Bank 


The Fat Boy 



Sam" Welter's Review of Con- 
certs. SmiL' and Singer 

To Correspondent* 

Sich a gitlin up Stairs 

God Blen the Queen of England 

Cockney Court-hip 

The Willow Tree 

Oh, Crikey! Oh, (iood Gracious 

Oh, Hush 

Rose of Jersey 

The Younff Courier .with lit 
Silver Bells 

The Castle's Lady 

The Knight with tie Azure 
Plume 

Hurrah for a London Road 

The Woodland Maid 

A Loyalty Man 

Dark Eved Maid of Palestine 

By the Clear Waters 

Hani Welter's Review of Con- 
certs, Soups, and Singers 2 

To Correspondents 



The NiKht before the Bridal 
The Soldier who died for bin 

Queen. 
Oh. what can Compare with a 

Gypsv's Life 
A Hundred Years Aitn 
Tho Old Man and the Child 



Ob, 'tis Gin 
The Felon 



ftanturn : 

PUBLISHED BY S. ROBINS, 17. BARBICAN 

AND SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS. 




EDQTED IV SAM WELILEK. 




CONTENTS: 



The Fit Boy 57 

The Niftht before the Bridal. 58 


Oh 1 'tis Gin 60 


The Englishman g 


The Soldier who died far lii 


Victoria's Queen of the Free 61 
S >phia is most Fair Ib. 


I'm not a Maiden now ih." 
Sam Weller Review of Con- 


Oh. what can compare with 
tl. Gipsey* Life ib. 
A Hundred Years A jo i>>. 
The Old Wan and the Child ... 60 


The Crossing Sweeper's La- 
ment >'> 

The Charming Woman 62 
Good Mornin Laak's All..... ib. 


certs, Songs, and Singers. 
No. 4 64 
Notice to Correspondents and 
Subscribers Ib. 



The Lass of Litchfield Town. ib. 



The Fat Boy. 

An Entire new Comic Song, written by Mr. T. 
FREST.and sung by Mr, HOWELL, 

AlR "Uiseriet of Living up Five Pair of 

Stain." 
My name's Joey Blubber, you're all heard 

r>' me, 
In a vorlc called the " Pickviclf," so famed, 

d'ye see ? 
I'm called the " Fat Boy," and I'm now all 

'.he rage- 
No. 8. VOL. I, 



Cos I reighs tventy (tun, and am twelra 

years of age ! 
Falks knock me about, just as they da 

skittles, 

Cos I a purpensity has for good wittuls 
But all as I eats dnps me pond, and in truth. 
You must own, 1 tin really a promising 

youth. 
Then grant but your smiles, and my hopes 

don't destroy. 
Tic- ill that's lequested by Jae, the F,U 

Boy! 




The Pickwickian Envelope. 
Parody of the "Mulrcady POSTAL ENVELOPE.' 



VOL. II 



PICKWICKIAXA 83 



w. c. w. 

PORTRAITS OF THE PICKWICK 
CHARACTERS. 

1837. 
Twelve wood-cut portraits, signed W. C. W. 

First published in " SAM WELLEH'S Pickwick Jest Book," in 

penny numbers ; afterwards in a weekly paper 

The Casket, in twopenny numbers. 



Both series published by BEGEH & Co., Holywell Street ; 
and PIGOIT & Co., Fleet Street. 

1837. 



84 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

THE BEAUTIES OF PICKWICK. 

COLLECTED AND ARRANGED 

BY 

SAM WELLER. 

'* From grave to gay from lively to severe." 
PRICE TWOPENCE. 

LONDON : 
Published by W. MORGAN, 266, Strand. 

1838. 



PARK'S ORIGINAL STAGE TRICKS. 

Sheet of Stage Transformation Tricks. 

WAHKKN'S BLACKING JAR (transformation trick) turns 
into SAM WELLE n. 

Ix)\DON : 

Sold by A. PARK, 47, Leonard Street, Finsbury, London. 



PICKWICKIANA 85 



THE- CASKET OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, 
AND ENTERTAINMENT. 

PORTRAITS OF THE PICKWICK CHARACTERS. 

SAM WELLER. 

MR. PICKWICK. 

MR. WELLER. 

MRS. WELLER. 

Miss RACHAEL WARDLE. 

STIGGINS. 

OLD MRS. WELLER. 

MR. WINKLE. 

OLD W A HOLE. 

BEN ALLEN. 

BOB SAWYER. 

DR. SLAMMER. 

THE FAT BOY. 

TUPMAN. 



86 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

1840. 

BELL'S LIFE 
GALLERY OF COMICALITIES, 

which have appeared from time to time in that popular 
Sporting Sunday Paper, " BdTx Life in London."" 

FEATURES OF A DEBTOR'S PRISON: 

No. 1. THE BILL DISCOUNTER No EFFECT'S. 

2. THE GENTLEMEN IN DIFFICULTY AT BOULOGNE. 

J3. THE MAN IN POSSESSION. 

4. THE JEW BAILIFF. 

5. THE SWELL COVE Our OF LUCK. 

6. THE TURNKEY. 

7. THE POOR PRISONER. 

8. THE KEEPER OF THE WHISTLING SHOP. 

9. THE INSOLVENT PREPARING TO GO TO COURT. 

10. THE ATTORNEY OF THE INSOLVENT COURT. 

11. RESPONSIBLE BAIL. 

12. THE OPPOSING CREDITOR. 



TIDDY DOLL. 

Published Weekly Price One Penny. 

A long wood-cut heading; with Buildings in the centre 
(Westminster Abbey, Houses of Parliament, and the Monu- 
ment). The City arms underneath. Groups of figures on 
either side, including Mr. Pickwick and Sam Weller. 



PICKWICKIANA 



87 



1 
1 


PICKWICKIA> 


NGSTER. 


ag all the popular 


ind Sentimental Sonj 


0> 


e wood-cut frontispiec 
>f the "Pickwick i 


es of blocks represent 
n scene ; Pickwick an 


g it together with moi 
ace ; the Fat Boy, wit 
otion, setting to a negr 
ir characters dancing i 
orchestra shown in 


2 background. ] 
E. LLOYD, 62, Broa 


et, Holborn. 


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SAM WELLER'S 


PICKWICK JEST-BO 

1837. 


THE LONDON 


SINGER'S MAGAZIl 

2 vols., 8vo. 

> Published by T. BUNCOMBE, '. 


Illustrated by R. CRUIKSHA] 
JONES, FINDLAY, etc. 
Among contents : 
" The Fat Boy " (with illustr 
"Sam Weller's Adventun 
Song of the Pickwickians, as s 
Pickwick Club, Long Acre" 
trated ivith an engraving). 


(7iVca 1839. 
Another copy, a different 
Songs and illustrations differ. 


THE PICKWICK CO 
ALMANACK FOR 18 


Containing Sam Weller's D 
Fun and Pastime, and Twelve 
Engravings by R. CRUIKSHANK 
8vo. wrappers, sewn. 


MARSHALL. 


CB 




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PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 



LLOYD'S NEW TWELFTH-NIGHT CHARACTERS. 

BROADSHEET OF 50 TWELFTH-NIGHT CHARACTERS, 

With a riddle under each respective character, and answers 

below. 

PICKWICK. SMANGLE. 

WINKLE. MR. WELLER, SENIOR. 

SERGEANT BU/FUZ. SAM WELLER. 

FAT BOY. 



LONDON : 

Printed and published by E. LLOYD, 
At the office of The Penny Sunday Times, 231, Shoreditch. 



PICKWICKIANA 89 

LANGLEY'S TWELFTH-NIGHT CHARACTERS, 

Twelfth-Night Cake in centre, with scroll on which title is 
inscribed ; Fat Boy on left ; Old Weller on right. 

Engraved by MARKS, 1841. 
Published by J. FAIRBURN, 110, Minories. 

MRS. LEO HUNTER. MR. NAMBY. 

COUNT SMORLTORK. MRS. POTT. 

ISABELLA WARDLE. SERGEANT BUZFUZ. 

CYRUS BANTAM. RACHAEL WARDLE. 

MR. MIVINS. 



FATRBURiN'S PICKWICK CHARACTERS, 

TwELFTH-NlGHT CAKE. 

THE PICKWICK CAKE. 
Published by J. FAIRBURN, Minories. 
(Characters etched by MARKS.) 



90 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 



THE ADVENTURES OF MARMADUKE MIDGE, 

THE PICKWICKIAN LEGATEE. 



Bv the author of " Tyburn Tree," " Nicodemus Bangs, 1 

" The Gold Finders," " The Old Manor 

House," c., &c. 



BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED. 



" We may roam through the world like a fly at a feast, 

Who sips of one sweet and then flies to the rest ; 
And when pleasure begins to grow dull in the East, 
Just order our wings, and be off to the West." 



Ix)NDON T : 

G. VICKKBS, 28 and 29, Holywell Street, Strand. 



SAM WELLER'S SCRAP SHEET 
PICKWICK CHARACTER PORTRAITS 



SAM WELLER'S SCEAP SHEET. 

CONTAINING ALL THE PICKWICK POHTHAITS. 

WITH THE 

POETICAL EFFUSIONS OF AUGUSTUS SNODGRASS, ESQ., M.P.C. 
PRICE ONE PENNY. Published by JONES, City Road. 

London : Sold at Cleavers Penny Gazette Office, Shoe Lane, 
Fleet Street. 

Undated. One sheet, containing forty woodcut-portraits, 
described as " All the Pic.kwick Characters,"" or " Cheap 
Illustrations to Box," published by John Cleeve (Cleeve's 
Penny Gazette of Variety and Amusement). 



An example of the traditional " Price one penny plain and 
two pence coloured " order of production. The artistic and 
literary sides of the undertaking, as may be assumed, are 
neither distinguished for originality, nor for neatness of 
adaptation. 

The published price, apparently a marvel of moderation, 
failed to hit the happy medium of quality allied with 
quantity ; considering the liberal scale of the latter, it is 
hypercritical to quarrel with the former. The pictures are 
poor adaptations, rudely copied from single figures of Pick- 
wickian celebrities found among PHIZ'S immortal and all- 
familiar illustrations to the " Pickwick Papers," coarsely cut 
on wood, executed by poor craftsmen at the lowest figure. 



94 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

Augustus Snodgrass, the Pickwickian bard among the 
characters, is represented in the traditional guise supposed 
to typify the externals of " the poetical soul " of the period ; 
a cloak with high fur collar, much affected by poetasters of 
that time, with the careless display of long poodle locks. 
Although " the poetical Snodgrass " is frequently alluded to, 
his lyrics are comparatively unknown. To the coy muse of 
this rare bard are ascribed the halting lines setting forth the 
" Poetical Characters,"" and explaining each respective Pick- 
wickian portrait; Jove had the reputation of nodding on 
occasions ; can it be credited that a Snodgrass condescended 
to paraphrase the halting doggerel lays of hireling scribes 
employed to furnish " tags " for halfpenny valentines ? For 
the hand of this last-mentioned humble pretender may 
be recognised in these Pickwickian " Poetical Effusions." 

The original broad sheet is now rare ; selections from the 
forty verses are here reprinted as curiosities (not essentially 
" Curiosities of Literature r> ) relating to Dickens and the 
Pickwick Gallery ; enthusiasts may accept the verses in place 
of the pictures ; of the two the lyrics are more novel. 

SAMUEL PICKWICK. 

Hail, jovial sir, right welcome, here 

Your friends pray introduce, 
Whose great renown in every town 

Has surely played the deuce. 

TRACY TUPMAN. 

My love far away with another has flown ; 

Ah ! sadly have I been treated, 
Wounded in body as well as in mind, 

And by a base friend am I cheated. 

NATHANIEL WINKLK. 

I'll to my fav'rite sport again 

Which caused so much alarm. 
Tupman I wing'd it's very true, 

But didn't mean him Aarm. 



PICKWICKIAN A 95 



AUGUSTUS SNODGRASS. 

Inspire me, god of poets, while I sing, 

The theme be woman's eye, 
Which sparkling bright, nought can outshine, 

Save planets in the sky. 

JINGLE. 

Madam your's Friend Pickwick how do ? 

Had capital wine claret port sherry, 
Jovial lot all right what say you ? 

Make one any time feel proud very ! 

MR. WARDLE. 

Friends, a welcome here you'll get, 

Tupman let not fair Rachel weep, 
With Pickwick here all sorrows cease. 

Where is that Boy ! damn him, he's fast asleep ! 

SAM WELLER. 

Vant his boots, young 'ooman d'ye say ? 

Veil, if people vill blow up, I let's 'em ; 
So just ax the gemman in twenty-two, 

If he'll have 'em now, or vait till he gets 'em ? 

THE FAT BOY. 

Fat, and fair, and fast asleep, 

I all things quiet take, 
Which I think will clearly prove, 

I'm precious wide awake. 

Miss RACHEL WARDLE. 

When woman smiles 'tis life to man, 

Which he's scarcely made believe, 
And 'spite of our little winning ways, 

Too oft our sex deceive. 

MRS. BARDLE. 

Of false men ye damsels all beware, 

For I so graceful, smart, and slick, 
Now wasted away as you can see, 

By one so base and vile Pickwick. 



96 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

MR. WELLER, senior. 

Now Samivel, my boy, drive on, 
We'll see the Governor bye and bye, 

He never would have been so done, 
If he had proved the AlleyH! 

SERGEANT BUZFUZ. 

One Thousand Five Hundred Pounds, 
A trifle the verdict will surely be carried 

In favour of Mrs. Bardell, 

Whom, mark me, I say he ought to have married. 

In addition to the lyrical specimens quoted, which include 
the chief performers, " Sam Welter's Scrap Sheet " further 
supplies portraits with descriptive verses attached of our Pick- 
wickian celebrities, the irascible Dr. Slammer, Mrs. Weller, Mr. 
Stiggins, Mr. Peter Magnus, Mr. Pott, Mrs. Pott, Mrs. Leo 
Hunter, Count Smorltork, Job Trotter, Mr. Ben Allen, Miss 
Arabella Allen, Mr. Bob Sawyer, Mary, Miss Emily Wardle, 
and Miss Isabella Wardle ; the rival parliamentary candi- 
dates, Samuel Slumkey, Esq., and Horatio Fit/kin, Esq., the 
Bathopian master of the ceremonies, Angelo Cyrus Bantam, 
Esq. ; Mr. Dowler ; the Justice, Squire Nupkins, and Mr. 
Jinks, his clerk ; the list of legal luminaries includes Mr. 
Perker ; those sharp practitioners, Messrs. Dodson and Fogg ; 
the sheriffs officer, Mr. Namby ; and the learned counsel, 
Serjeant Snubbin, with his rival. Of the Queen's Bench 
characters we have Smangle, Mivins, and the turnkey Roker. 



DICKENS'S SUFFERINGS AT THE HANDS OF 
CERTAIN PIRATICAL GANGS. 

JOHN FORSTER and Talfourd were urgent in their recom- 
mendations to Dickens to prosecute the lawless band of 
pirates who continued to lay predaceous claws upon the 
literary offspring of his brain. 

His biographer has written : " A graver wrong was the 
piracy of his writings, every one of which had been repro- 
duced with merely such colourable changes of little incidents, 
and names of characters, as were believed to be sufficient to 
evade the law and adapt them to 'penny 1 purchasers. So 
shamelessly had this been going on ever since the days of 
' PICKWICK,"* in so many outrageous ways and with all but 
impunity, that a course repeatedly urged by Talfourd and 
myself was at last taken in 1844 with the ' Christmas Carol ' 
and the ' Chuzzlewit ' pirates. Upon a case of such peculiar 
flagrancy, however, that the Vice-Chancellor would not even 
hear Dickens's counsel ; and what it cost our dear friend 
Talfourd to suppress his speech exceeded by very much the 
labour and pains with which he had prepared it. 'The 
pirates, 1 wrote Dickens to me, after leaving the Court on the 
18th of January, ' are beaten flat. They are bruised, bloody, 
battered, smashed, squelched, and utterly undone. Knight 
Bruce would not hear Talfourd, but instantly gave judgment. 
He had interrupted Anderton constantly by asking him to 
produce a passage which was not an expanded or contracted 
idea from my book. And, at every successive passage he 
cried out, ' That is Mr. Dickens's case. Find another ! " He 
said that there was not a shadow of doubt upon the matter. 
That there was no authority which would bear a construc- 
tion in their favour ; the piracy going beyond all previous 

VOL. II. H 



98 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

instances." 1 " The results were not satisfactory, for the victory 
remained a barren moral one, and Dickens failed to recover 
his costs, obtained no practical redress, and the pirates 
continued to loot his property much as before. 

In fact, it proved that Diekens's repugnance to seek legal 
redress was more than ever justified by the nugatory results 
of these vexatious experiences ; he felt, as he wrote to 
Forster : " Expense, anxiety, and injustice were the stum- 
bling blocks it is better to suffer a great wrong than to 

have recourse to the much greater wrong of the law 

It is useless to affect that I don^t know I have a morbid 
susceptibility of exasperation, to which the meanness and 
badness of the law in such a matter would be stinging in the 
last degree. And I know of nothing that could come, even 
of a successful action, which would be worth the mental 
trouble and disturbance it would cost."" 

These explanatory paragraphs are here introduced as being 
much to the point ; for, at first sight, while dealing with 
" PIRACIES OF PICKWICK," it must appear to have been 
mistaken leniency on Dickens's part to allow the plunderers 
to filch thus freely his own legal rights and literary property, 
and to suffer them to line their purses to his pecuniary loss, 
and to the disparagement of his writings, thus horribly 
mangled and travestied in the stealing. It will be seen that 
these robberies went on wholesale. Some time previously 
Dickens had treated these piracies, through which he never- 
theless suffered inordinately, in that spirit of pleasantrv 
which so well accorded with his superabundant flow of good 
spirits and genial toleration, when the elasticity of youth 
made light of grave grievances, and the flagrant injustices 
under which the writer groaned in spirit, were handled with 
sportive playfulness. 

This is illustrated in the burlesque " Proclamation " 
Dickens thought proper to issue on the eve of the publication 
of the first, number of " Nicholas Nickleby." As the denuncia- 
tions therein set forth are obviously levelled at the pirates 



AGAINST PIRATICAL GANGS 99 

who had ruthlessly plagiarised " PICKWICK," we may consider 
this document an official warning to the tasteless depre- 
dators who had laid violent hands on ' Boz's ' first work ; 
examples of their forgeries, plagiarisms, and piracies are 
reproduced in the present chapter; it must be felt the 
following document, issued 28th of February, 1838, affords 
an additional light upon Dickens's personal feelings on the 
subject of " ' PICKWICK ' pirates " : 

proclamation. 

$Sif)erea8 we are the only true and lawful " 13&." 

^ntl 2U!)tea!3 it hath been reported to us, who are com- 
mencing a New Work to be called THE 

LIFE & ADVENTURES OF NICHOLAS NICKLEBY, 

THAT some dishonest dullards, resident in the by-streets and 
cellars of this town, impose upon the unwary and credu- 
lous, by producing cheap and wretched imitations of our 
delectable Works &nTj SUljmns we derive but small 
comfort under this injury, from the knowledge that the 
dishonest dullards aforesaid cannot, by reason of their 
mental smallness aforesaid, follow near our heels, but are 
constrained to creep along by dirty and little-frequented 
ways, at a most respectful and humble distance behind. 

&nll (52Ef)eveaS, in like manner, as some vermin are not worth 
the killing for the sake of their carcases, so these kennel 
pirates are not worth the powder and shot of the law, 
inasmuch as whatever damages they may commit, they 
are in no condition to pay any. 

&f)ts is to gibe jBtotice. 

FIRSTLY, 

TO PIRATES 

THAT we have at length devised a mode of execution 
for them, so summary and terrible, that if any gang or 

H 2 



100 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

gangs thereof presume to hoist but one shred of the 
colours of the good ship NICKLEBY, we will hang 
them on gibbets so lofty and enduring, that their 
remains shall be a monument of our just vengeance to 
all succeeding ages, and it shall not lie in the power of 
any Lord High Admiral on earth to cause them to be 
taken down again. 1 

at the office of our Board of Trade aforesaid, 
in the presence of our Secretaries, EDWARD 
CHAPMAN & WILLIAM HALL, on this Twenty- 
eighth day of February, One Thousand Eight 
Hundred and Thirty-eight. 

(Signed) 



$0*. 



The foregoing curious and characteristic announcement 
was issued as a leaflet, the proclamation filling three pages 
demy octavo. 

1 The SECONDLY and THIRDLY apply strictly to tJie publishing arrange- 
ments of "NICHOLAS NICKLEBY," and have no further direct connection 
with " PICKWICK." 



PICKWICK EEVIVED. 



BY 

CHARLES DICKENS. 



1840. 

FllOM 

"MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 
BY "THIZ" 

TO 

PICKWICK REVIVED, 

BY 

CHARLES DICKENS. 

VIDE 

" MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK." 
1840. 



PACK 

Frontispiece " THE CLOCK CLUB" RUN DOWN ... 104 

Initial W 105 

MR. PICKWICK'S FIRST VISIT TO MASTER HUMPHREY 109 

MR. WELLER, SENIOR, AND HIS GRANDSON TONY WELLER " Now 

I'M GRANDFATHER!" 117 

Initial A (MR. PICKWICK AND MASTER HUMPHREY) 122 

MR. PICKWICK AT MASTER HUMPHREY'S "CLOCK CLUB" 123 

BILL BLINDER'S LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 133 

Initial I (MR. WELLER'S ARRIVAL) 134 

MR. WELLER'S WATCH CLUB . 135 

OLD WELLER AND HIS GRANDSON TONY IN THE HOUSEKEEPER'S ROOM 149 
Tailpiece MR. WELLER'S WATCH CLUB RUN DOWN 155 



104 




H. K. Browne. 
Drawing on wood by " PHIZ. 

Frontispiece. 

' MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK CLUB' RUN DOWN. 
" Master Humphrey's Clock." 1840. 




MR. PICKWICK'S RE-APPEARANCE IN "MASTER 
HUMPHREY'S CLOCK." 

BY CHARLES DICKENS. 

MASTER HUMPHREY'S VISITOR. 

HEN I am in a thoughtful mood, I often 
succeed in diverting the current of some 
mournful reflections, by conjuring up a 
number of fanciful associations with the 
objects that surround me and dwelling 
upon the scenes and characters they 
suggest. 

I have been led by this habit to assign to every room in my 
house and every old staring portrait on its walls a separate 
interest of its own. Thus, I am persuaded that a stately 
dame, terrible to behold in her rigid modesty, who hangs 
above the chimney-piece of my bedroom, is the former lady 
of the mansion. In the courtyard below is a stone face of 
surpassing ugliness, which I have somehow in a kind of 
jealousy, I am afraid associated with her husband. Above 
my study is a little room with ivy peeping through the 
lattice, from which I bring their daughter, a lovely girl of 
eighteen or nineteen years of age, and dutiful in all respects save 
one, that one being her devoted attachment to a young gentle- 
man on the stairs, whose grandmother (degraded to a disused 
laundry in the garden) piques herself upon an old family 
quarrel, and is the implacable enemy of their love. With such 
materials as these I work out many a little drama, whose chief 



106 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

merit is, that I can bring it to a happy end at will. I have 
so many of them on hand, that if on my return home one of 
these evenings I were to find some bluff old wight of two 
centuries ago comfortably seated in my easy-chair, and a 
lovelorn damsel vainly appealing to his heart, and leaning her 
white arm upon my clock itself, I verily believe I should only 
express my surprise that they had kept me waiting so long, 
and never honoured me with a call before. 

I was in such a mood as this, sitting in my garden yester- 
day morning under the shade of a favourite tree, revelling in 
all the bloom and brightness about me, and feeling every 
sense of hope and enjoyment quickened by this most beauti- 
ful season of Spring, when my meditations were interrupted 
by the unexpected appearance of my barber at the end of the 
walk, who I immediately saw was coming towards me with a 
hasty step that betokened something remarkable. 

My barber is at all times a very brisk, bustling, active 
little man for he is, as it were, chubby all over, without 
being stout or unwieldy, but yesterday his alacrity was so very 
uncommon that it quite took me by surprise. For could I 
fail to observe when he came up to me that his grey eyes 
were twinkling in a most extraordinary manner, that his little 
red nose was in an unusual glow, that every line in his round 
bright face was twisted and curved into an expression of 
pleased surprise, and that his whole countenance was radiant 
with glee ? I was still more surprised to see my housekeeper, 
who usually preserves a very staid air, and stands somewhat 
upon her dignity, peeping round the hedge at the bottom of 
the walk, and exchanging nods and smiles with the barber, 
who twice or thrice looked over his shoulder for that purpose. 
I could conceive no announcement to which these appearances 
could be the prelude, unless it were that they had married 
each other that morning. 

I was, consequently, a little disappointed when it only came 
out that there was a gentleman in the house who wished to 
speak with me. 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 107 

" And who is it ? " said I. 

The barber, .with his face screwed up still tighter than 
before, replied that the gentleman would not send his name, 
but wished to see me. I pondered for a moment, wondering 
who this visitor might be, and I remarked that he embraced 
the opportunity of exchanging another nod with the house- 
keeper, who still lingered in the distance. 

" Well ! " said I, " bid the gentleman come here. 1 ' 

This seemed to be the consummation of the barber's hopes, 
for he turned sharp round, and actually ran away. 

Now, my sight is not very good at the distance, and there- 
fore when the gentleman first appeared in the walk, I was 
not quite clear whether he was a stranger to me or otherwise. 
He was an elderly gentleman, but came tripping along in the 
pleasantest manner conceivable, avoiding the garden-roller 
and the borders of the beds with inimitable dexterity, 
picking his way among the flower-pots, and smiling with un- 
speakable good humour. Before he was half-way up the walk he 
began to salute me ; then I thought I knew him ; but when he 
came towards me with his hat in his hand, the sun shining on 
his bald head, his bland face, his bright spectacles, his fawn- 
coloured tights, and his black gaiters, then my heart 
warmed towards him, and I felt quite certain that it was 
Mr. Pickwick. 

" My dear sir," said that gentleman as I rose to receive 
him, " pray be seated. Pray sit down. Now, do not stand 
on my account. I must insist upon it, really." With these 
words Mr. Pickwick gently pressed me down into my seat, and 
taking my hand in his, shook it again and again with a 
warmth of manner perfectly irresistible. I endeavoured to 
express in my welcome something of that heartiness and 
pleasure which the sight of him awakened, and made him sit 
down beside me. All this time he kept alternately releasing 
my hand and grasping it again, and surveying me through 
his spectacles with such a beaming countenance as I never till 
then beheld. 



108 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

" You knew me directly ! " said Mr. Pickwick. " What a 
pleasure it is to think that you knew me directly ! " 

I remarked that I had read his adventures very often, and 
his features were quite familiar to me from the published 
portraits. As I thought it a good opportunity of adverting 
to the circumstance, I condoled with him upon the various 
libels on his character which had found their way into print. 
Mr. Pickwick shook his head, and for a moment looked very 
indignant, but smiling again directly, added that no doubt I 
was acquainted with Cervantes's introduction to the second 
part of Don Quixote, and that it fully expressed his 
sentiments on the subject. 

" But now,"" said Mr. Pickwick, " don't you wonder how I 
found you out ? " 

" I shall never wonder, and, with your good leave, never 
know,"" said I, smiling in my turn. " It is enough for me 
that you give me this gratification. I have not the least 
desire that you should tell me by what means I have obtained 
it." 

" You are very kind," returned Mr. Pickwick, shaking me 
by the hand again ; " you are so exactly what I expected. 
But for what particular purpose do you think I sought you, 
my good sir ? Now what do you think I have come for ? " 

Mr. Pickwick put this question as though he were 
persuaded that it was morally impossible that I could by any 
means divine the deep purpose of his visit, and that it must 
be hidden from all human ken. Therefore, although I was 
rejoiced to think that I had anticipated his drift, I feigned to 
be quite ignorant of it, and after a brief consideration shook 
my head despairingly. 

" What should you say," said Mr. Pickwick, laying the 
forefinger of his left hand upon my coat-sleeve, and looking 
at me with his head thrown back, and a little on one side, 
" what should you say if I confessed that after reading your 
account of yourself and your little society, I had come here a 
humble candidate for one of those empty chairs ? "" 



109 




w 

> , 

sal 

|fi fi 

* rc 5 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 111 

" I should say," I returned, " that I know of only one cir- 
cumstance which could still further endear that little society 
to me, and that would be the associating with it my old 
friend, for you must let me call you so, my old friend, 
Mr. Pickwick." 

As I made him this answer every feature of Mr. Pickwick's 
face fused itself into one all-pervading expression of delight. 
After shaking me heartily by both hands at once, he patted 
me gently on the back, and then I well understood why 
coloured up to the eyes, and hoped with great earnestness of 
manner that he had not hurt me. 

If he had, I would have been content that he should have 
repeated the offence a hundred times rather than suppose so ; 
but as he had not, I had no difficulty in changing the subject 
by making an enquiry which had been upon my lips twenty 
times already. 

" You have not told me," said I, " anything about Sam 
Weller." 

" O ! Sam," replied Mr. Pickwick, " is the same as ever. 
The same^ true, faithful fellow that he ever was. What 
should I tell you about Sam, my dear sir, except that he is 
more indispensable to my happiness and comfort every day of 
my life ? " 

" And Mr. Weller senior ? " said I. 

" Old Mr. Weller," returned Mr. Pickwick, " is in no 
respect more altered than Sam, unless it be that he is a little 
more opinionated than he was formerly, and perhaps at times 
more talkative. He spends a good deal of his time now in 
our neighbourhood, and has so constituted himself a part of 
my bodyguard, that when I ask permission for Sam to have a 
seat in your kitchen on clock nights (supposing your three 
friends think me worthy to fill one of the chairs), I am afraid 
I must often include Mr. Weller too." 

I very readily pledged myself to give both Sam and his 
father a free admission to my house at all hours and seasons, 
and this point settled, we fell into a lengthy conversation, 



112 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

which was carried on with as little reserve on both sides as if 
we had been intimate friends from our youth, and which 
conveyed to me the comfortable assurance that Mr. Pickwick's 
buoyancy of spirit, and indeed all his old cheerful character- 
istics, were wholly unimpaired. As he had spoken of the 
consent of my friends as being yet in abeyance, I repeatedly 
assured him that his proposal was certain to receive their 
most joyful sanction, and several times entreated that he would 
give me leave to introduce him to Jack Redburn and Mr. 
Miles (who were near at hand) without further ceremony. 

To this proposal, however, Mr. Pickwick's delicacy would 
by no means allow him to accede, for he urged that his 
eligibility must be formally discussed, and that until this had 
been done, he could not think of obtruding himself further. 
The utmost I could obtain from him was a promise that he 
would attend upon our next night of meeting, that I might 
have the pleasure of presenting him immediately on his 
election. 

Mr. Pickwick, having with many blushes placed in my 
hands a small roll of paper, which he termed his " qualifica- 
tion,"' put a great many questions to me touching my friends, 
and particularly Jack Redburn, whom he repeatedly termed 
" a fine fellow," and in whose favour I could see he was 
strongly predisposed. When I had satisfied him on these 
points, I took him up into my room, that he might make 
acquaintance with the old chamber which is our place of 
meeting. 

" And this," said Mr. Pickwick, stopping short, " is the 
clock ! Dear me ! And this is really the old clock ! " 

I thought he would never, have come away from it. After 
advancing towards it softly, and laying his hand upon it with 
as much respect and as many smiling looks as if it were alive, 
he set himself to consider it in every possible direction, now 
mounting on a chair to look at the top, now going down upon 
his knees to examine the bottom, now surveying the sides 
with his spectacles almost touching the case, and now trying 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 113 

to peep between it and the wall to get a slight view of the 
back. Then he would retire a pace or two and look up at 
the dial to see it go, and then draw near again and stand 
with his head on one side to hear it tick : never failing to 
glance towards me at intervals of a few seconds each, and nod 
his head with such complacent gratification as I am quite 
unable to describe. His admiration was not confined to the 
clock either, but extended itself to every article in the room ; 
and really, when he had gone through them every one, and at 
last sat himself down in all the six chairs, one after another, 
to try how they felt, I never saw such a picture of good 
humour and happiness as he presented, from the top of his 
shining head down to the very last button of his gaiters. 

I should have been well pleased, and should have had the 
utmost enjoyment of his company, if he had remained with 
me all day ; but my favourite, striking the hour, reminded him 
that he must take his leave. I could not forbear telling him 
once more how glad he had made me, and we shook hands all 
the way downstairs. 

We had no sooner arrived in the Hall than my house- 
keeper, gliding out of her little room (she had changed her 
gown and cap, I observed), greeted Mr. Pickwick with her 
best smile and courtesy ; and the barber, feigning to be 
accidentally passing on his way out, made him a vast number 
of bows. When the housekeeper courtesied, Mr. Pickwick 
bowed with the utmost politeness, and when he bowed, the 
housekeeper courtesied again ; between the housekeeper and 
the barber, I should say that Mr. Pickwick faced about and 
bowed with undiminished affability fifty times at least. 

I saw him to the door ; an omnibus was at the moment 
passing the corner of the lane, which Mr. Pickwick hailed and 
ran after with extraordinary nimbleness. When he had got 
about half-way, he turned his head, and seeing that I was 
still looking after him and that I waved my hand, stopped, 
evidently irresolute whether to come back and shake hands 
again, or to go on. The man behind the omnibus shouted, 

VOL. II I 



114 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

and Mr. Pickwick ran a little way towards him : then he 
looked round at me, and ran a little way back again. Then 
there was another shout, and he turned round once more and 
ran the other way. After several of these vibrations, the man 
settled the question by taking Mr. Pickwick by the arm and 
putting him into the carnage ; but his last action was to let 
down the window and wave his hat to me as it drove off'. 



PAUTICTI.AKS OF MASTER HUMPHREY'S VISITOR. 

Being very full of Mr. Pickwick's application, and highly- 
pleased with the compliment he had paid me, it will be 
readilv supposed that long before our next night of meeting 
I communicated it to my three friends, who unanimously 
voted his admission into our body. We all looked forward 
with some impatience to the occasion which would enrol him 
among us, but I am greatly mistaken if Jack Redburn and 
mvself were not by many degrees the most impatient of the 
party. 

At length the night came, and a few minutes after ten, 
Mr. Pickwick's knock was heard at the street-door. He was 
shown into a lower room, and I directly took my crooked 
stick and went to accompany him upstairs, in order that he 
might be presented with all honour and formality. 

" Mr. Pickwick," said I, on entering the room, " I am 
rejoiced to see you, rejoiced to believe that this is but the 
opening of a long series of visits to this house, and but the 
beginning of a close and lasting friendship." 

That gentleman made a suitable reply with a cordiality 
and frankness peculiarly his own, and glanced with a smile 
towards two persons behind the door, whom I had not at 
first observed, and whom I immediately recognised as Mr. 
Samuel AVeller and his father. 

It was a warm evening, but the elder Mr. Weller was 
attired, notwithstanding, in a most capacious greatcoat, and 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 115 

his chin enveloped in a large speckled shawl, such as is usually 
worn by stage coachmen on active service. He looked very 
rosy and very stout, especially about the legs, which appeared 
to have been compressed into his topboots with some 
difficulty. His broad-brimmed hat he held under his left 
arm, and with the forefinger of his right hand he touched 
his forehead a great many times in acknowledgment of my 
presence. 

" I am very glad to see you in such good health, Mr. 
Weller," said I. 

" Why, thankee, sir," returned Mr. Weller, " the axle an't 
broke yet. We keeps up a steady pace, not too sewere, but 
vith a moderate degree o' friction, and the consekens is that 
ve're still a runnin' and comes in to the time reglar. My 
son Samivel, sir, as you may have read on in history," added 
Mr. Weller, introducing his first-born. 

I received Sam very graciously, but before he could say a 
word his father struck in again. 

"Samivel Veller, sir," said the old gentleman, "has con- 
ferred upon me the ancient title o' grandfather vich had long 
laid dormouse, and wos s'posed to be nearly hex-tinct in our 
family. Sammy, relate a anecdote o' vun o' them boys, that 
'ere little anecdote about young Tony sayin' as he vould 
smoke a pipe unbeknown to his mother." 

" Be quiet, can't you ? " said Sam ; " I never see such a old 
magpie never ! " 

" That 'ere Tony is the blessedest boy," said Mr. Weller, 
heedless of this rebuff, " the blessedest boy as ever / see in my 
days ! of all the charmin'est infants as ever I heerd tell on, 
includin' them as was kivered over by the robin-redbreasts 
arter they'd committed sooicide with blackberries, there never 
wos any like that 'ere little Tony. He's alvays a playin' vith a 
quart pot, that boy is ! To see him a settin' down on the door- 
step pretending to drink out of it, and fetching a long breath 
artervards, and smoking a bit of fire-vood, and sayin', ' Now 
I'm grandfather,' to see him a doin' that at two year old is 

i 2 



116 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

better than any play as wos ever wrote. ' Now I'm grand- 
father ! ' He wouldn't take a pint pot if you wos to make 
him a present on it, but he gets his quart, and then he says, 
* Now I'm grandfather ! ' ' 

Mr. Weller was so overpowered by this picture that he 
straightway fell into a most alarming n't of coughing, which 
must certainly have been attended with some fatal result but 
for the dexterity and promptitude of Sam, who, taking a firm 
grasp of the shawl just under his father's chin, shook him to 
and fro with great violence, at the same time administering 
some smart blows between his shoulders. By this curious 
mode of treatment Mr. Weller was finally recovered, but with 
a very crimson face, and in a state of great exhaustion. 

" He'll do now, Sam," said Mr. Pickwick, who had been in 
some alarm himself. 

" Hell do, sir ! " cried Sam, looking reproachfully at his 
parent. " Yes, he will do one o' these days, he'll do for his- 
self and then he'll wish he hadn't. Did anybody ever see 
sich a inconsiderate old file, laughing into conwulsions afore 
company, and stamping on the floor as if he'd brought his 
own carpet vith him and wos under a wager to punch the 
pattern out in a given time ? He'll begin again in a minute. 
There he's a-goin' off I said he would ! " 

In fact, Mr. Weller, whose mind was still running upon his 
precocious grandson, was seen to shake his head from side to 
side, while a laugh, working like an earthquake below the 
surface, produced various extraordinary appearances in his 
face, chest, and shoulders, the more alarming because un- 
accompanied by any noise whatever. These emotions, however, 
gradually subsided, and after three or four short relapses he 
wiped his eyes with the cuff of his coat, and looked about him 
with tolerable composure. 

" Afore the governor vith-draws," said Mr. Weller, " there 
is a pint, respecting vich Sammy has a qvestion to ask. Vile 
that qvestion is a pi'rwadin" 1 this here conwersation, p'raps the 
genl'men vill permit me to re-tire."" 



117 




MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 119 

" Wot are you goin' away for ? " demanded Sam, seizing 
his father by the coat-tail. 

" I never see such a undootiful boy as you, Samivel," 
returned Mr. Weller. " Didn't you make a solemn promise, 
amountin' almost to a speeches o' wow, that you'd put that 
'ere qvestion on my account ? " 

" Well, I'm agreeable to do it," said Sam, " but not if you 
go cuttin' away like that, as the bull turned round and mildly 
observed to the drover ven they wos a goadin' him into the 
butcher's door. The fact is, sir," said Sam, addressing me, 
" that he wants to know somethin' respectin' that 'ere lady as 
is housekeeper here." 

" Ay. What is that ? " 

" Vy, sir," said Sam, grinning still more, " he wishes to 
know vether she 

" In short," interposed old Mr. Weller decisively, a perspira- 
tion breaking out upon his forehead, " vether that 'ere old 
creetur is or is not a widder." 

Mr. Pickwick laughed heartily, and so did I, as I replied 
decisively that " my housekeeper was a spinster." 

" There ! " cried Sam, " now you're satisfied. You hear 
she's a spinster." 

" A wot ? " said his father, with deep scorn. 

" A spinster," replied Sam. 

Mr. Weller looked very hard at his son for a minute or 
two, and then said, 

" Never mind vether she makes jokes or not, that's no 
matter. Wot I say is, is that 'ere female a widder, or is 
she not?" 

"Wot do you mean by her making jokes?" demanded 
Sam, quite aghast at the obscurity of his parent's speech. 

" Never you mind, Samivel," returned Mr. Weller gravely ; 
" puns may be wery good things or they may be wery bad 
'uns, and a female may be none the better or she may be 
none the vurse for making of 'em ; that's got nothing to do 
vith widders." 



120 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

" Wy now,"" said Sam, looking round, " would anybody 
believe as a man at his time o 1 life could be running his head 
agin spinsters and punsters being the same thing ? " 

" There an't a straw's difference between 'em, 11 said Mr. 
Weller. " Your father didn't drive a coach for so many 
years, not to be ekal to his own langvidge as far as that goes, 
Sammy. 11 

Avoiding the question of etymology, upon which the old 
gentleman's mind was quite made up, he was several times 
assured that the housekeeper had never been married. He 
expressed great satisfaction on hearing this, and apologised 
for the question, remarking that he had been greatly terrified 
by a widow not long before, and that his natural timidity 
was increased in consequence. 

" It wos on the rail, 1 ' said Mr. Weller, with strong emphasis ; 
" I wos a goin' down to Birmingham by the rail, and I wos 
locked up in a close carriage vith a living widder. Alone we 
wos ; the widder and me wos alone ; and I believe it wos 
only because we wos alone and there wos no clergyman in the 
conwayance, that that 'ere widder didn't marry me afore ve 
reached the half-way station. Ven I think how she began a 
screaming as we wos a-goin' under them tunnels in the dark, 
how she kept on a faintin' and ketchin 1 hold o 1 me, and how 
I tried to bust open the door as was tight-locked and 
perwented all escape Ah ! It wos a awful thing, most 
awful ! 11 

Mr. Weller was so very much overcome by this retrospect 
that he was unable, until he had wiped his brow several times, 
to return any reply to the question whether he approved of 
railway communication ; notwithstanding that it would appear 
from the answer which he ultimately gave, that he entertained 
strong opinions on the subject. 

" I con-sider, 11 said Mr. Weller, " that the rail is unconstitoo- 
tional and an inwaser o 1 priwileges, and I should wery much 
like to know what that ^re old Carter as once stood up for 
our liberties and wun 'em too, I should like to know wot he 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 121 

vould say, if he wos alive now, to Englishmen being locked 
up vith widders, or with anybody again their wills. Wot a 
old Carter would have said, a old Coachman may say, and I 
as-sert that in that pint o' view alone, the rail is an inwaser. 
As to the comfort, vere's the comfort o 1 sittin''in a harmcheer 
lookin' at brick walls or heaps o 1 mud, never comin' to a 
public-house, never seem" 1 a glass o' ale, never goin' through a 
pike, never meetin' a change o' no kind (horses or othervise), 
but alvays comin' to a place, ven you come to one at all, the 
wery picter o' the last, vith the same pleesemen standing 
about, the same blessed old bell a ringin', the same unfort'nate 
people standin behind the bars, a waitin' to be let in ; and 
everythin' the same except the name, vich is wrote up in the 
same sized letters as the last name, and vith the same colours. 
As to the honour and dignity o' travelling vere can that be 
vithout a coachman ; and wot's the rail to sich coachmen and 
guards as is sometimes forced to go by it, but a outrage and a 
insult ? As to the pace, wot sort o' pace do you think I, Tony 
Veller, could have kept a coach goin' at, for five hundred 
thousand pound a mile, paid in adwance afore the coach wos 
on the road ? And as to the ingein, a nasty, wheezin', 
creakin', gasping puffin 1 , bustin' monster, alvays out o 1 breath, 
vith a shiny green-and-gold back, like a unpleasant beetle in 
that 'ere gas magnifier, as to the ingein as is alvays a pourin' 
out red-hot coals at night, and black smoke in the day, the 
sensiblest thing it does, in my opinion is, ven there's somethin' 
in the vay, and it sets up that 'ere frightful scream vich 
seems to say, ' Now here's two hundred and forty passengers 
in the wery greatest extremity o' danger, and here's their two 
hundred and forty screams in vun ! ' ' 

By this time I began to fear that my friends would be 
rendered impatient by my protracted absence. I therefore 
begged Mr. Pickwick to accompany me up-stairs, and left 
the two Mr. Wellers in the care of the housekeeper, laying 
strict injunctions upon her to treat them with all possible 
hospitality. 




122 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 



THE CLOCK. 

S we were going upstairs, Mr. Pickwick 
put on his spectacles, which he had 
held in his hand hitherto ; arranged his 
neckerchief, smoothed down his waist- 
coat, and made many other little pre- 
parations of that kind which men are 
accustomed to be mindful of, when they 
are going among strangers for the first time, and are anxious 
to impress them pleasantly. Seeing that I smiled, he smiled 
too, and said that if it had occurred to him before he left 
home, he would certainly have presented himself in pumps 
and silk stockings. 

" I would, indeed, my dear sir," he said very seriously ; 
" I would have shown my respect for the society, by laying 
aside my gaiters." 

" You may rest assured," said I, " that they would have 
regretted your doing so very much, for they are quite attached 
to them." 

" No, really ! " cried Mr. Pickwick, with manifest pleasure. 
" Do you think they care about my gaiters ? Do you 
seriously think that they identify me at all with my 
gaiters ? " 

" I am sure they do," I replied. 

" Well, now," said Mr. Pickwick, " that is one of the most 
charming and agreeable circumstances that could possibly 
have occurred to me ! " 

I should not have written down this short conversation, 
but that it developed a slight point in Mr. Pickwick's 
character, with which I was not previously acquainted. 
He has a secret pride in his legs. The manner in which he 
spoke, and the accompanying glance he bestowed upon his 
tights, convince me that Mr. Pickwick regards his legs with 
much innocent vanity. 



123 




MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 125 

But here are our friends," said I, opening the door and 
taking his arm in mine ; " let them speak for themselves. 
Gentlemen, I present to you Mr. Pickwick." 

Mr. Pickwick and I must have been a good contrast just 
then. I, leaning quietly on my crutch-stick, with something 
of a careworn, patient air ; he, having hold of my arm, and 
bowing in every direction with the most elastic politeness, 
and an expression of face whose sprightly cheerfulness and 
good-humour knew no bounds. The difference between us 
must have been more striking yet, as we advanced towards 
the table, and the amiable gentleman, adapting his jocund 
step to my poor tread, had his attention divided between 
treating my infirmities with the utmost consideration, and 
affecting to be wholly unconscious that I required any. 

I made him personally known to each of my friends in 
turn. First to the deaf gentleman, whom he regarded 
with much interest, and accosted with great frankness and 
cordiality. He had evidently some vague idea, at the 
moment, that my friend being deaf must be dumb also ; for 
when the latter opened his lips to express the pleasure it 
afforded him to know a gentleman of whom he had heard so 
much, Mr. Pickwick was so extremely disconcerted, that I 
was obliged to step in to his relief. 

His meeting with Jack Redburn was quite a treat to see. 
Mr. Pickwick smiled, and shook hands, and looked at him 
through his spectacles, and under them, and over them, and 
nodded his head approvingly, and then nodded to me, as 
much as to say, "This is just the man; you were quite 
right " ; and then turned to Jack and said a few hearty words, 
and then did and said everything over again with unimpaired 
vivacity. As to Jack himself, he was quite as much 
delighted with Mr. Pickwick as Mr. Pickwick could possibly 
be with him. Two people never can have met together since 
the world began who exchanged a warmer or more enthusiastic 
greeting. 

It was amusing to observe the difference between this 



126 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

encounter and that which succeeded, between Mr. Pickwick 
and Mr. Miles. It was clear that the latter gentleman 
viewed our new member as a kind of rival in the affections of 
Jack Redburn, and besides this, he had more than once 
hinted to me, in secret, that although he had no doubt Mr. 
Pickwick was a very worthy man, still he did consider that 
some of his exploits were unbecoming a gentleman of his 
years and gravity. Over and above these grounds of 
distrust, it is one of his fixed opinions that the law never 
can by possibility do anything wrong ; he therefore looks 
upon Mr. Pickwick as one who has justly suffered in purse 
and peace for a breach of his plighted faith to an unprotected 
female, and holds that he is called upon to regard him with 
some suspicion on that account. These causes led to a rather 
cold and formal reception ; which Mr. Pickwick acknowledged 
with the same stateliness and intense politeness as was 
displayed on the other side. Indeed, he assumed an air of 
such majestic defiance, that I was fearful he might break out 
into some solemn protest or declaration, and therefore 
inducted him into his chair without a moment's delay. 

This piece of generalship was perfectly successful. The 
instant he took his seat, Mr. Pickwick surveyed us all with a 

/ 

most benevolent aspect, and was taken with a fit of smiling 
full five minutes long. His interest in our ceremonies was 
immense. They are not very numerous or complicated, and 
a description of them may be comprised in very few words. 
As our transactions have already been, and must necessarily 
continue to be, more or less anticipated by being presented 
in these pages at different times, and under various forms, 
they do not require a detailed account. 

Our first proceeding when we are assembled is to shake 
hands all round, and greet each other with cheerful and 
pleasant looks. Remembering that we assemble not only 
for the promotion of our happiness, but with the view of 
adding something to the common stock, an air of languor or 
indifference in any member of our body would be regarded by 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 127 

the others as a kind of treason. We have never had an 
offender in this respect ; but if we had, there is no doubt that 
he would be taken to task pretty severely. 

Our salutation over, the venerable piece of antiquity from 
which we take our name is wound up in silence. This 
ceremony is always performed by Master Humphrey himself 
(in treating of the club, I may be permitted to assume the 
historical style, and speak of myself in the third person), who 
mounts upon a chair for the purpose, armed with a large 
key. While it is in progress, Jack Redburn is required to 
keep at the farther end of the room under the guardianship 
of Mr. Miles, for he is known to entertain certain aspiring 
and unhallowed thoughts connected with the clock, and has 
even gone so far as to state that if he might take the works 
out for a day or two, he thinks he could improve them. We 
pardon him his presumption in consideration of his good 
intentions, and his keeping this respectful distance, which 
last penalty is insisted on, lest by secretly wounding the 
object of our regard in some tender part, in the ardour of his 
zeal for its improvement, he should fill us with dismay and 
consternation. 

This regulation afforded Mr. Pickwick the highest delight, 
and seemed, if possible, to exalt Jack in his good opinion. 

The next ceremony is the opening of the clock-case (of 
which Master Humphrey has likewise the key), the taking 
from it as many papers as will furnish forth our evening's 
entertainment, and arranging in the recess such new contribu- 
tions as have been provided since our last meeting. This is 
always done with peculiar solemnity. The deaf gentleman 
then fills and lights his pipe, and we once more take our 
seats round the table before mentioned, Master Humphrey 
acting as president, if we can be said to have any president, 
where all are on the same social footing, and our friend 
Jack as secretary. Our preliminaries being now concluded, 
we fall into any train of conversation that happens to 
suggest itself, or proceed immediately to one of our readings. 



128 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIAN A 

In the latter case, the paper selected is consigned to Master 
Humphrey, who flattens it carefully on the table and makes 
dog's ears in the corner of every page, ready for turning over 
easily ; Jack Redburn trims the lamp with a small machine 
of his own invention, which usually puts it out ; Mr. Miles 
looks on with great approval notwithstanding ; the deaf 
gentleman draws in his chair, so that he can follow the words 
on the paper or on Master Humphrey's lips as he pleases ; 
and Master Humphrey himself, looking round with mighty 
gratification, and glancing up at his old clock, begins to 
read aloud. 

Mr. Pickwick's face, while his tale was being read, would 
have attracted the attention of the dullest man alive. The 
complacent motion of his head and forefinger as he gently 
beat time, and corrected the air with imaginary punctuation, 
the smile that mantled on his features at every jocose 
passage, and the sly look he stole around to observe its effect, 
the calm manner in which he shut his eyes and listened when 
there was some little piece of description, the changing 
expression with which he acted the dialogue to himself, his 
agony that the deaf gentleman should know what it was all 
about, and his extraordinary anxiety to correct the reader 
when he hesitated at a word in the manuscript, or substituted 
a wrong one, were alike worthy of remark. And when at 
last, endeavouring to communicate with the deaf gentleman 
by means of the finger alphabet, with which he constructed 
such words as are unknown in any civilised or savage 
language, he took up a slate and wrote in large text, one 
word in a line, the question, " How do you like it ? " 
when he did this, and handing it over the table awaited the 
reply, with a countenance only brightened and improved by 
his great excitement, even Mr. Miles relaxed, and could 
not forbear looking at him for the moment with interest 
and favour. 

" It has occurred to me," said the deaf gentleman, who 
had watched Mr. Pickwick and everybody else with silent 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 129 

satisfaction, " it has occurred to me, 11 said the deaf gentle- 
man, taking his pipe from his lips, " that now is our time 
for filling our only empty chair." 

As our conversation had naturally turned upon the vacant 
seat, we lent a willing ear to this remark, and looked at our 
friend inquiringly. 

" I feel sure," said he, " that Mr. Pickwick must be ac- 
quainted with somebody who would be an acquisition to us ; 
that he must know the man we want. Pray let us not lose any 
time, but set this question at rest. Is it so, Mr. Pickwick ? " 

The gentleman addressed was about to return a verbal 
reply, but remembering our friend's infirmity, he substituted 
for this kind of answer some fifty nods. Then taking up 
the slate and printing on it a gigantic " Yes," he handed it 
across the table, and rubbing his hands as he looked round 
upon our faces, protested that he and the deaf gentleman 
quite understood each other, already. 

" The person I have in my mind," said Mr. Pickwick, " and 
whom I should not have presumed to mention to you until 
some time hence, but for the opportunity you have given me, 
is a very strange old man. His name is Bamber." 

" Bamber ! " said Jack. " I have certainly heard the name 
before." 

" I have no doubt, then," returned Mr. Pickwick, " that 
you remember him in those adventures of mine (the 
Posthumous Papers of our old club, I mean), although he is 
only incidentally mentioned ; and, if I remember right, 
appears but once." 

"That's it," said Jack. "Let me see. He is the person 
who has a grave interest in old mouldy chambers and the 
Inns of Court, and who relates some anecdotes having 
reference to his favourite theme, and an odd ghost story, 
is that the man ? " 

" The very same. Now," said Mr. Pickwick, lowering his 
voice to a mysterious and confidential tone, " he is a very 
extraordinary and remarkable person ; living, and talking, 

VOL. II K 



PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

and looking, like some strange spirit, whose delight is to 
haunt old buildings ; and absorbed in that one subject which 
you have just mentioned, to an extent which is quite wonder- 
ful. When I retired into private life, I sought him out, and I do 
assure you that the more I see of him, the more strongly I am 
impressed with the strange and dreamy character of his mind." 

" Where does he live ?" I inquired. 

" He lives," said Mr. Pickwick, " in one of those dull, 
lonely old places with which his thoughts and stories are all 
connected ; quite alone, and often shut up close for several 
weeks together. In this dusty solitude he broods upon the 
fancies he has so long indulged, and when he goes into the 
world, or anybody from the world without goes to see him, 
they are still present to his mind and still his favourite topic. 
I may say, I believe, that he has brought himself to entertain 
a regard for me, and an interest in my visits ; feelings which I 
am certain he would extend to Master Humphrey's Clock if 
he were once tempted to join us. All I wish you to under- 
stand is, that he is a strange secluded visionary, in the world 
but not of it ; and as unlike anybody here as he is unlike 
anybody elsewhere that I have ever met or known." 

Mr. Miles received this account of our proposed companion 
with rather a wry face, and after murmuring that perhaps he 
was a little mad, inquired if he were rich. 

" I never asked him," said Mr. Pickwick. 

" You might know, sir, for all that," retorted Mr. Miles, 
sharply. 

" Perhaps so, sir," said Mr. Pickwick, no less sharply than 
the other, " but I do not. Indeed," he added, relapsing into 
his usual mildness, "I have no means of judging. He lives 
poorly, but that would seem to be in keeping with his 
character. I never heard him allude to his circumstances, 
and never fell into the society of any man who had the 
slightest acquaintance with them. I have really told you all 
I know about him, and it rests with you to say whether you 
wish to know more, or know quite enough already." 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 131 

We were unanimously of opinion that we would seek to 
know more ; and as a sort of compromise Avith Mr. Miles 
(who, although he said " Yes O certainly he should like to 
know more about the gentleman he had no right to put 
himself in opposition to the general wish, 11 and so forth, 
shook his head doubtfully and hemmed several times with 
peculiar gravity), it was arranged that Mr. Pickwick should 
cany me with him on an evening visit to the subject of our 
discussion, for which purpose an early appointment between 
that gentleman and myself was immediately agreed upon ; it 
being understood that I was to act upon my own responsi- 
bility, and to invite him to join us or not, as I might think 
proper. This solemn question determined, we returned to 
the clock-case (where we have been forestalled by the reader), 
and between its contents, and the conversation they oc- 
casioned, the remainder of our time passed very quickly. 

When we broke up, Mr. Pickwick took me aside to tell me 
that he had spent a most charming and delightful evening. 
Having made this communication with an air of the strictest 
secrecy, he took Jack Redburn into another corner to tell 
him the same, and then retired into another corner with the 
deaf gentleman and the slate, to repeat the assurance. It 
was amusing to observe the contest in his mind whether he 
should extend his confidence to Mr. Miles, or treat him with 
dignified reserve. Half-a-dozen times he stepped up behind 
him with a friendly air, and as often stepped back again 
without saying a word ; at last, when he was close at that 
gentleman's ear and upon the very point of whispering some- 
thing conciliating and agreeable, Mr. Miles happened suddenly 
to turn his head, upon which Mr. Pickwick skipped away, and 
said with some fierceness, " Good-night, sir I was about to 
say good-night, sir, nothing more " ; and so made a bow and 
left him. 

" Now, Sam, 1 " said Mr. Pickwick, when he had got down- 
stairs. 

"All right, sir," replied Mr. Weller. "Hold hard, sir. 

K 2 



132 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

Right arm fust now the left now one strong conwulsion, 
and the great-coat's on, sir. 11 

Mr. Pickwick acted upon these directions, and being 
further assisted by Sam, who pulled at one side of the collar, 
and Mr. Weller, who pulled hard at the other, was speedily 
enrobed. Mr. Weller, senior, then produced a full-si/ed 
stable lantern, which he had carefully deposited in a remote 
corner, on his arrival, and inquired whether Mr. Pickwick 
would have " the lamps alight." 

" I think not to-night," said Mr. Pickwick. 

" Then if this here lady vill per-mit, 1 ' rejoined Mr. Weller, 
" well leave it here, ready for next journey. This here 
Ian tem, mum, 11 said Mr. Weller, handing it to the house- 
keeper, " vunce belonged to the celebrated Bill Blinder as is 
now at grass, as all on us vill be in our turns. Bill, man), 
wos the hostler as had charge o 1 them two veil-known piebald 
leaders that run in the Bristol fast coach, and vould never go 
to no other tune but a sutherly vind and a cloudy sky, which 
was consekvently played incessant, by the guard, wenever they 
wos on duty. He wos took wery bad one arternoon, arter 
having been off' his feed, and wery shaky on his legs for some 
veeks ; and he says to his mate, ' Matey, 1 he says, ' I think 
Ym a-goin 1 the wrong side o 1 the post, and that my foot's 
wery near the bucket. Don^ say I ant, 1 he says, ' for I know 
I am, and don't let me be interrupted, 1 he says, * for Fve saved 
a little money, and Ym a-goin 1 into the stable to make my 
last vill and testymint. 1 ' 111 take care as nobody interrupts, 1 
says his mate, * but you oiiy hold up your head, and shake 
vour ears a bit, and you're good for twenty veal's to come. 1 
Bill Blinder makes him no answer, but he goes avay into the 
stable, and there he soon artervards lavs himself down atween 
the two piebalds, and dies, prevously a writin 1 outside the 
corn -chest, ' This is the last vill and testymint of Villiam 
Blinder. 1 They wos nafrally wery much amazed at this, and 
arter looking among the litter, and up in the loft, and vere 
not, they opens the corn-chest, and finds that he\l been and 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 



133 



chalked his vill inside the lid ; so the lid was obligated to be 
took oft' the hinges, and sent up to Doctor Commons to be 
proved, and under that 'ere wery instrument this here lantern 
was passed to Tony Veller ; vich circumstarnce, mum, gives it 
a wally in my eyes, and makes me rekvest, if you vill be so 
kind, as to take partickler care on it." 

The housekeeper graciously promised to keep the object of 
Mr. Weller's regard in the safest possible custody, and Mr. 




H. K. Browne. 

Drawing on wood by " PHIZ.' 

'THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF BILL BLINDER." 
" Master Humphrey's Clock." 1840. 



Pickwick, with a laughing face, took his leave. The body- 
guard followed, side by side ; old Mr. Weller buttoned and 
wrapped up from his boots to his chin ; and Sam with his 
hands in his pockets and his hat half oft' his head, remon- 
strating with his father, as he went, on his extreme loquacity. 
I was not a little surprised, on turning to go upstairs, to 
encounter the barber in the passage at that late hour ; for his 
attendance is usuallv confined to some half-hour in the 



134 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

morning. But Jack Redburn, who finds out (by instinct, I 
think) everything that happens in the house, informed me 
with great glee, that a society in imitation of our own had 
been that night formed in the kitchen, under the title of 
" Mr. Wellers Watch," of which the barber was a member ; 
and that he could pledge himself to find means of making me 
acquainted with the whole of its future proceedings, which I 
begged him, both on my own account and that of my 
readers, by no means to neglect doing. 



Mil. WELLER'S WATCH. 

T seems that the housekeeper and the two 
Mr. Wellers were no sooner left together 
on the occasion of their first becoming 
acquainted, than the housekeeper- called 
to her assistance Mr. Slithers the barber, 
who had been lurking in the kitchen in 
expectation of her summons ; and with 
many smiles and much sweetness intro- 
duced him as one who would assist her in the responsible 
office of entertaining her distinguished visitors. 

" Indeed," said she, " without Mr. Slithers I should have 
been placed in quite an awkward situation." 

"There is no call for any hock'erdness, mum," said Mr. 
Weller with the utmost politeness ; " no call wotsumever. A 
lady," added the old gentleman, looking about him with the 
air of one who establishes an incontrovertible position, " a 
lady can't be hock'erd. Natur" has otherwise purwided." 

The housekeeper inclined her head and smiled yet more 
sweetly. The barber, who had been fluttering about Mr. 
Weller and Sam in a state of great anxiety to improve their 
acquaintance, rubbed his hands and cried, " Hear, hear ! 
Very true, sir ; " whereupon Sam turned about and steadily 
regarded him for some seconds in silence. 




135 




MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 137 

" I never knew," said Sam, fixing his eyes in a ruminative 
manner upon the blushing barber, " I never knew but vun o' 
your trade, but lie wos worth a dozen, and wos indeed 
dewoted to his callin' ! " 

" Was he in the easy shaving way, sir," inquired Mr. 
Slithers ; " or in the cutting and curling line ? " 

" Both," replied Sam ; " easy shavin' was his natur', and 
cuttin' and curlin' was his pride and glory. His whole 
delight was in his trade. He spent all his money in bears, 
and run in debt for 'em besides, and there they wos a 
growling avay down in the front cellar all day long, and 
ineffectooally gnashing their teeth, vile the grease o' their 
relations and friends wos being re-tailed in gallipots in the 
shop above, and the first -floor winder wos ornamented vith 
their heads ; not to speak o 1 the dreadful aggrawation it 
must have been to 'em to see a man alvays a walkin' up and 
down the pavement outside, vith the portrait of a bear in his 
last agonies, and underneath in large letters, ' Another fine 
animal wos slaughtered yesterday at Jinkinson's. ' Howsoever, 
there they wos, and there Jinkinson wos, till he wos took wery 
ill with some inn'ard disorder, lost the use of his legs, and 
wos confined to his bed, vere he laid a wery long time, but 
sich wos his pride in his profession, even then, that wenever 
he wos worse than usual the doctor used to go down-stairs and 
say, ' Jinkinson's wery low this mornin' ; we must give the 
bears a stir ' ; and as sure as ever they stirred 'em up a bit 
and made 'em roar, Jinkinson opens his eyes if he wos ever so 
bad, calls out, ' There's the bears ! ' and re wives agin." 

" Astonishing ! " cried the barber. 

" Not a bit," said Sam, " human natur' neat as imported. 
Vim day the doctor happenin' to say, ' I shall look in as usual 
to-morrow mornin',' Jinkinson catches hold of his hand and 
says, ' Doctor,' he says, ' will you grant me one favour ? ' 'I 
will, Jinkinson,' says the doctor. ' Then, doctor,' says 
Jinkinson, ' vill you come unshaved, and let me shave you ? ' 
' I will,' says the doctor, ' God bless you,' says Jinkinson. 



138 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

Next day the doctor came, and arter he'd been shaved all 
skilful and regular, he says, ' Jinkinson,' he says, ' it's wery 
plain this does you good. Now,' he says, ' I've got a coach- 
man as has got a beard that it 'ud warm your heart to work 
on, and though the footman," 1 he says, ' hasn't got much of a 
beard, still he's a trying it on vith a pair o' viskers to that 
extent that razors is Christian charity. If they take it in 
turns to mind the carriage when it's a waitin' below,' he says, 
' wot's to hinder you from operatin' on both of 'em ev'ry 
day as well as upon me ? you've got six children,' he says, 
' wot's to hinder you from shaviii' all their beads and keepin' 
'em shaved ? you've got two assistants in the shop down- 
stall's, wot's to hinder you from cuttin' and curlin' them as 
often as you like ? Do this,' he says, ' and you're a man agin.' 
Jinkinson squeedged the doctor's hand and begun that wery 
day ; he kept his tools upon the bed, and wenever he felt his- 
self gettin' worse, he turned to at vun o' the children who 
wos a runnin' about the house vith heads like clean Dutch 
cheeses, and shaved hi in agin. Vun day the lawyer come to 
make his vill ; all the time he wos a takin' it down, Jinkinson 
was secretly a clippin' avay at his hair vith a large pair of 
scissors. ' Wot's that 'ere snippin' noise ? ' says the lawyer 
every now and then ; ' it's like a man havin' his hair cut.' It 
w wery like a man havin' his hair cut,' says poor Jinkinson, 
hidin' the scissors and lookin' quite innocent. By the time 
the lawyer found it out, he was wery nearly bald. Jinkinson 
wos kept alive in this vay for a long time, but at last vun day 
he has in all the children vun arter another, shaves each on 
'em wery clean, and gives him vun kiss on the crown o' his 
head ; then he has in the two assistants, and arter cuttin' and 
curlin' of 'em in the first style of elegance, says he should like 
to hear the woice o' the greasiest bear, vich rekvest is 
immedetly complied with ; then he says that he feels wery 
happy in his mind and vishes to be left alone ; and then he 
dies, previously cuttin' his own hair and makin' one flat curl 
in the wery middle of his forehead." 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 139 

This anecdote produced an extraordinary effect, not only 
upon Mr. Slithers, but upon the housekeeper also, who evinced 
so much anxiety to please and be pleased, that Mr. Weller, 
with a manner betokening some alarm, conveyed a whispered 
inquiry to his son whether he had gone " too fur." 

" Wot do you mean by too fur ? " demanded Sam. 

"In that ""ere little compliment respectin' the want of 
hock'erdness in ladies, Sammy," replied his father. 

" You don't think she's fallen in love with you in 
consekens o' that, do you ? " said Sam. 

" More unlikelier things have come to pass, my boy," 
replied Mr. Weller in a hoarse whisper ; " I'm always afeerd of 
inadwertent captiwation, Sammy. If I know'd how to make 
myself ugly or unpleasant, I'd do it, Samivel, rayther than live 
in this here state of perpetival terror ! " 

Mr. Weller had, at that time, no further opportunity of 
dwelling upon the apprehensions which beset his mind, for 
the immediate occasion of his fears proceeded to lead the way 
downstairs, apologising as they went for conducting him into 
the kitchen, which apartment, however, she was induced to 
proffer for his accommodation in preference to her own little 
room, the rather as it afforded greater facilities for smoking, 
and was immediately adjoining the ale-cellar. The prepara- 
tions which were already made sufficiently proved that these 
were not mere words of course, for on the deal table were a 
sturdy ale-jug and glasses, flanked with clean pipes and a 
plentiful supply of tobacco for the old gentleman and his son, 
while on a dresser hard by was goodly store of cold meat 
and other eatables. At sight of these arrangements Mr. 
Weller was at first distracted between his love of joviality 
and his doubts whether they were not to be considered as so 
many evidences of captivation having already taken place ; 
but he soon yielded to his natural impulse, and took his seat 
at the table with a very jolly countenance. 

" As to imbibin' any o' this here flagrant veed, mum, in the 
presence of a lady," said Mr. Weller taking up a pipe and 



140 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

laying it down again, " it couldn't be. Samivel, total 
abstinence, if you please." 

" But I like it of all things,"" said the housekeeper. 

" No," rejoined Mr. Weller, shaking his head, " no." 

" Upon my woi'd I do," said the housekeeper. " Mr. 
Slithers knows I do." 

Mr. Weller coughed, and notwithstanding the barber's con- 
firmation of the statement, said " No " again, but more feebly 
than before. The housekeeper lighted a piece of paper, 
and insisted on applying it to the bowl of the pipe 
with her own fair hands ; Mr. Weller resisted ; the house- 
keeper cried that her fingers would be burnt; Mr. Weller 
gave way. The pipe was ignited, Mr. Weller drew a long 
puff' of smoke, and detecting himself in the very act of 
smiling on the housekeeper, put a sudden constraint upon his 
countenance and looked sternly at the candle, with a deter- 
mination not to captivate, himself, or encourage thoughts of 
captivation in others. From this iron frame of mind he was 
roused by the voice of his son. 

" I don't think," said Sam, who was smoking with great 
composure and enjoyment, " that if the lady wos agreeable it 
'nd be wery far out o' the vay for us four to make up a club 
of our own like the governors does up-stairs, and let him," 
Sam pointed with the stem of his pipe towards his parent, 
" be the president." 

The housekeeper affably declared that it was the very 
thing she had been thinking of. The barber said the same. 
Mr. Weller said nothing, but he laid down his pipe as if in a 
fit of inspiration, and performed the following manoeuvres. 

Unbuttoning the three lower buttons of his waistcoat and 
pausing for a moment to enjov the easy flow of breath 
consequent upon this process, he laid violent hands upon his 
watch-chain, and slowly and with extreme difficulty drew from 
his fob an immense double-cased silver watch, which brought 
the lining of the pocket with it, and was not to be disentangled 
but by great exertions and an amazing redness of face. 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 141 

Having fairly got it out at last, he detached the outer case 
and wound it up with a key of corresponding magnitude ; 
then put the case on again, and having applied the watch to 
his ear to ascertain that it was still going, gave it some half- 
dozen hard knocks on the table to improve its performance. 

" That,"" said Mr. Weller, laying it on the table with its 
face upwards, " is the title and emblem o' this here society. 
Sammy, reach them two stools this vay for the vacant cheers. 
Ladies and gen'lmen, Mr. Welter's Watch is vound up and 
now a-goin\ Order ! " 

By way of enforcing this proclamation, Mr. Weller, using 
the watch after the manner of a president's hammer, and 
remarking with great pride that nothing hurt it, and that falls 
and concussions of all kinds materially enhanced the 
excellence of the works and assisted the regulator, knocked 
the table a great many times, and declared the association 
formally constituted. 

" And don't let's have no grinnm" 1 at the cheer, Samivel," 
said Mr. Weller to his son, " or I shall be committiiV you to 
the cellar, and then pYaps we may get into what the 
"Merrikins call a fix, and the English a qvestion o' privileges." 

Having uttered this friendly caution, the President settled 
himself in his chair with great dignity, and requested that 
Mr. Samuel would relate an anecdote. 

" Fve told one,"" said Sam. 

" Wery good, sir ; tell another," returned the chair. 

" We wos a talking jist now, sir," said Sam, turning to 
Slithers " about barbers. Pursuing that 'ere fruitful theme, 
sir, ril tell you in a wery few words a romantic little story 
about another barber as pYaps you may never have heerd." 

" Samivel," said Mr. Weller, again bringing his watch and 
the table into smart collision, " address your obserwations to 
the cheer, sir, and not to priwate indiwiduals ! " 

" And if I might rise to order," said the barber in a soft 
voice, and looking round him with a conciliatory smile as he 
leant over the table, with the knuckles of his left hand 



142 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

resting upon it, " if I might rise to order, I would suggest 
that ' barbers ' is not exactly the kind of language which is 
agreeable and soothing to our feelings. You, sir, will correct 
me if I'm wrong, but I believe there is such a word in the 
dictionary as hairdressers."" 

" Well, but suppose he wasn't a hairdresser," suggested Sam. 

" Wy then, sir, be parliamentary and call him vun all the 
more,'" returned his father. " In the same vay as ev'ry 
gen'lman in another place is a honourable, ev'ry barber in this 
place is a hairdresser. Ven you read the speeches in the 
papers, and see as vun gen'lman says of another, ' the 
honourable member, if he vill allow me to call him so,' you will 
understand, sir, that that means, ' if he vill allow me to keep 
up that 'ere pleasant and uniwersal fiction.' " 

It is a common remark, confirmed by history and 
experience, that great men rise with the circumstances in 
which they are placed. Mr. Weller came out so strong in his 
capacity of chairman, that Sam was for some time prevented 
from speaking by a grin of surprise, which held his faculties 
enchained, and at last subsided in a long whistle of a single 
note. Nay, the old gentleman appeared even to have 
astonished himself, and that to no small extent, as was 
demonstrated by the vast amount of chuckling in which he 
indulged, after the utterance of these lucid remarks. 

" Here's the story," said Sam. " Vunce upon a time there 
wos a young hairdresser as opened a wery smart little shop 
vith four wax dummies in the winder, two gen'lmen and two 
ladies the gen'lmen with blue dots for their beards, wery 
large viskers, oudacious heads of hair, uncommon clear eyes, 
and nostrils of amazin' pinkness ; the ladies vith their heads 
o' one side, their right forefingers on their lips, and their 
forms deweloped beautiful, in vich last respect they had the 
adwantage over the gen'lmen, as wasn't allowed but wery 
little shoulder, and terminated rayther abrupt in fancy 
drapery. He had also a many hair-brushes and tooth-brushes 
bottled up in the winder, neat glass-cases on the counter, a 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 143 

floor-clothed cutting-room up-stairs, and a weighin-'macheen in 
the shop, right opposite the door. But the great attraction and 
ornament wos the dummies, which this here young hairdresser 
wos constantly a runnin 1 out in the road to look at, and con- 
stantly a runnin' in agin to touch up and polish ; in short, he 
wos so proud on 'em, that ven Sunday come, he wos always 
wretched and miserable to think they wos behind the shutters, 
and looked anxiously for Monday on that account. Vim 
o 1 these dummies wos a fav'rite vith him beyond the 
others ; and ven any of his acquaintance asked him wy he 
didn't get married as the young ladies he know'd, in 
partickler, often did he used to say, ' Never ! I never vill 
enter into the bonds of vedlock, 1 he says, ' until I meet vith a 
young "ooman as realises my idea o 1 that 'ere fairest dummy 
vith the light hair. Then, and not till then, 1 he says, 'I vill 
approach the altar. 1 All the young ladies he know'd as had 
got dark hair told him this wos wery sinful, and that he wos 
wurshippin 1 a idle ; but them as wos at all near the same 
shade as the dummy coloured up wery much, and wos 
observed to think him a wery nice young man. 11 

"SamiveV said Mr. Weller, gravely, "a member o 1 this 
associashun bein 1 one o 1 that 'ere tender sex which is now 
immedetly referred to, I have to rekvest that you vill make 
no reflections. 11 

" I ain't a makin 1 any, am I ? " inquired Sam. 

" Order, sir ! " rejoined Mr. Weller, with severe dignity. 
Then, sinking the chairman in the father, he added, in his 
usual tone of voice : " Samivel, drive on ! " 

Sam interchanged a smile with the housekeeper, and 
proceeded : 

"The young hairdresser hadn't been in the habit o 1 
makin 1 this avowal above six months, ven he en-countered a 
young lady as wos the wery picter o 1 the fairest dummv. 
' Now, 1 he says, ' it's all up. I am a slave ! 1 The young 
lady was not only the picter o 1 the fairest dummy, but she 
was wery romantic, as the young hairdresser was, too, and he 



144 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

says, * () ! ' he says, 'here's a community o' feelin', here's 
a flow o' soul ! ' he says, * here's a interchange o' sentiment ! ' 
The young lady didn't say much, o' course, but she expressed 
herself agreeable, and shortly artervards vent to see him vith 
a mutual friend. The hairdresser rushes out to meet her, 
but d'rectly she sees the dummies she changes colour and falls 
a tremblin' violently. * Look up, n\\ love,' says the hair- 
dresser, ' behold your imige in my winder, but not corrector 
than in my art ! ' ' My imige ! ' she says. ' Yourn ! ' replies 
the hairdresser. ' But whose imige is that ? ' she says, a pinting 
at von o' the gen'lmen. ' No vun's, my love,' he says, ' it is 
but a idea.' ' A idea ! ' she cries : ' it is a portrait, I feel it is 
a portrait, and that 'ere noble face must be in the milling- 
tary ! ' * Wot do I hear ! ' says he, a crumplin' his curls. 
' Villiam Gibbs,' she says, quite firm, * never renoo the subject. 
I respect you as a friend,' she says, ' but my affections is set 
upon that manly brow.' ' This,' says the hairdresser, * is a 
reg'lar blight, and in it I perceive the hand of Fate. Fare- 
veil ! ' Vith these vords he rushes into the shop, breaks 
the dummy's nose vith a blow of his curlin'-irons, melts him 
down at the parlour fire, and never smiles artervards." 

" The young lady, Mr. Weller ? " said the housekeeper. 

" Why, ma'am," said Sam, " finding that Fate had a spite 
agin her, and everybody she come into contact vith, she never 
smiled neither, but read a deal o' poetry and pined avay, by 
rayther slow degrees, for she ain't dead yet. It took a deal o' 
poetry to kill the hairdresser, and some people say arter all 
that it was more the gin and water as caused him to be run 
over ; pYaps it was a little o' both, and came o' mixing the two." 

The barber declared that Mr. Weller had related one of 
the most interesting stories that had ever come within his 
knowledge, in which opinion the housekeeper entirely con- 
curred. 

" Are you a married man, sir ? " inquired Sam. 

The barber replied that he had not that honour. 

" I s'pose you mean to be ? " said Sam. 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 145 

" Well,"" replied the barber, rubbing his hands smirkingly, 
" I don't know, I don't think it's very likely." 

" That's a bad sign," said Sam ; " if you'd said you meant 
to be one o' these days, I should ha' looked upon you as bein' 
safe. You're in a wery precarious state." 

" I am not conscious of any danger, at all events," returned 
the barber. 

" No more wos I, sir," said the elder Mr. Weller, inter- 
posing; those vere my symptoms exactly. I've been took 
that vay twice. Keep your vether eye open, my friend, or 
you're gone." 

There was something so very solemn about this admoni- 
tion, both in its matter and manner, and also in the way in 
which Mr. Weller still kept his eye fixed upon the unsuspecting 
victim, that nobody cared to speak for some little time, and 
might not have cared to do so for some time longer, if the 
housekeeper had not happened to sigh, which called off the 
old gentleman's attention and gave rise to a gallant inquiry 
whether " there wos anythin' wery piercin' in that 'ere little 
heart." 

" Dear me, Mr. Weller ! " said the housekeeper, laughing. 

" No, but is there anythin' as agitates it ? " pursued the 
old gentleman. " Has it always been obderrate, always 
opposed to the happiness o' human creeturs ? Eh ? Has 
it?" 

At this critical juncture for her blushes and confusion, the 
housekeeper discovered that more ale was wanted, and hastily 
withdrew into the cellar to draw the same, followed by the 
barber, who insisted on carrying the candle. Having looked 
after her with a very complacent expression of face, and after 
him with some disdain, Mr. Weller caused his glance to 
travel slowly round the kitchen, until at length it rested on 
his son. 

" Sammy," said Mr. Weller, " I mistrust that barber." 

" Wot for ? " returned Sam ; " wot's he got to do with 
you? -You're a nice man, you are, arter pretendin' all kinds 

VOL. n L 



146 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

o' terror, to go a payin' compliments and talkin' about hearts 
and piercers."" 

The imputation of gallantry appeared to afford Mr. 
Weller the utmost delight, for he replied in a voice choked by 
suppressed laughter, and with the tears in his eyes, 

" Wos I a talkin' about hearts and piercers, wos I though, 
Sammy, eh ? " 

" Wos you ? of course you wos." 

" She don't know no better, Sammy, there ain't no harm 
in it, no danger, Sammy ; she's only a punster. She 
seemed pleased, though, didn't she ? O' course, she wos 
pleased, it's nat'ral she should be, wery nat'ral." 

" He's wain of it ! " exclaimed Sam, joining in his father's 
mirth. " He's actually wain ! " 

" Hush ! " replied Mr. Weller, composing his features 
" they're a comin' back, the little heart's a comin' back. 
But mark these wurds o' mine once more, and remember 'em 
ven your father says he said 'em. Samivel, I mistrust that 
'ere deceitful barber." 



MASTER HUMPHREY FROM His CLOCK-SIDE IN THE CHIMNEY- 
CORKER. 

Two or three evenings after the institution of Mr. Weller's 
Watch, I thought I heard, as I walked in the garden, the 
voice of Mr. Weller himself at no great distance ; and stop- 
ping once or twice to listen more attentively, I found that 
the sounds proceeded from my housekeeper's little sitting- 
room, which is at the back of the house. I took no further 
notice of the circumstance at that time, but it formed the 
subject of a conversation between me and my friend Jack 
Redburn next morning, when I found that I had not 
been deceived in my impression. Jack furnished me with the 
following particulars ; and as he appeared to take extra- 
ordinary pleasure in relating them, I have begged him in 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 147 

future to jot down any such domestic scenes or occurrences 
that may please his humour, in order that they may be told 
in his own way. I must confess that, as Mr. Pickwick and he 
are constantly together, I have been influenced in making 
this request, by a secret desire to know something of their 
proceedings. 

On the evening in question, the houskeeper's room was 
arranged with particular care, and the housekeeper herself 
was very smartly dressed. The preparations, however, were 
not confined to mere showy demonstrations, as tea was 
prepared for three persons, with a small display of preserves 
and jams and sweet cakes, which heralded some uncommon 
occasion. Miss Benton (my housekeeper bears that name) was 
in a state of great expectation, too, frequently going to the 
front door and looking anxiously down the lane, and more 
than once observing to the servant-girl that she expected 
company, and hoped no accident had happened to delay 
them. 

A modest ring at the bell at length allayed her fears, and 
Miss Benton, hurrying into her own room and shutting herself 
up, in order that she might preserve that appearance of being 
taken by surprise which is so essential to the polite reception 
of visitors, awaited their coming with a smiling countenance. 

" Good ev'nin', mum,' 1 ' 1 said the older Mr. Weller, looking 
in at the door after a prefatory tap. " I'm afeerd we've come 
in rayther arter the time, mum, but the young colt being full 
o' wice, has been a boltin' and shyin' and gettin' his leg over 
the traces to sich a extent that if he an't wery soon broke in, 
he'll wex me into a broken heart, and then he'll never be 
brought out no more except to learn his letters from the 
writin' on his grandfather's tombstone." 

With these pathetic words, which were addressed to some- 
thing outside the door about two feet six from the ground, 
Mr. Weller introduced a very small boy firmly set upon a 
couple of very sturdy legs, who looked as if nothing could ever 
knock him down. Besides having a very round face strongly 



148 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIAN A 

resembling Mr. Waller's, and a stout little body of exactly 
his build, this young gentleman, standing with his little legs 
very wide apart, as if the top-boots were familiar to them, 
actually winked upon the housekeeper with his infant eye, in 
imitation of his grandfather. 

" There's a naughty bov, mum," said Mr. Weller, bursting 
with delight, " there's a immoral Tony. Was there ever a 
little chap o' four year and eight months old as vinked his 
eye at a strange lady afore ? " 

As little affected by this observation as by the former 
appeal to his feelings, Master Weller elevated in the air 
a small model of a coach whip which he carried in his hand, 
and addressing the housekeeper with a shrill " ya hip ' " 
inquired if she was " going down the road ; " at which happy 
adaptation of a lesson he had been taught from infancy, 
Mr. Weller could restrain his feelings no longer, but gave 
him twopence on the spot. 

" It's in wain to deny it, mum," said Mr. Weller, " this 
here is a boy arter his grandfather's own heart, and beats out 
all the boys as ever wos or will be. Though at the same 
time, mum," added Mr. Weller, trying to look gravely down 
upon his favourite, " it wos wery wrong on him to want to 
over all the posts as we come along, and wery cruel on him to 
force poor grandfather to lift him cross-legged over every vun 
of 'em. He wouldn't pass vun single tyessed post, mum, and 
at the top of the lane there's seven-and-forty on 'em all in a 
row, and wery close together." 

Here Mr. Weller, whose feelings were in a perpetual con- 
flict between pride in his grandson's achievements and a sense 
of his own responsibility, and the importance of impressing 
him with moral truths, burst into a fit of laughter, and 
suddenly checking himself, remarked in a severe tone that 
little boys as made their grandfathers put 'em over posts 
never went to heaven at any price. 

By this time the housekeeper had made tea, and little 
Tony, placed on a chair beside her, with his eyes nearly on 



149 




MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 151 

a level with the top of the table, was provided with various 
delicacies which yielded him extreme contentment. The 
housekeeper (who seemed rather afraid of the child, notwith- 
standing her caresses) then patted him on the head, and 
declared that he was the finest boy she had ever seen. 

" Wy, mum," said Mr. Weller, " I don't think you'll see a 
many sich, and that's the truth. But if my son Samivel 
vould give me my vay, mum, and only dis-pense vith his 
might I wenture to say the vurd ? " 

" What word, Mr. Weller ? " said the housekeeper, blushing 
slightly. 

" Petticuts, mum," returned that gentleman, laying his 
hand upon the garments of his grandson. " If my son 
Samivel, mum, vould only dis-pense vith these here, you'd see 
such a alteration in his appearance, as the imagination can't 
depicter." 

" But what would you have the child wear instead, Mr. 
Weller ? " said the housekeeper. 

" I've offered my son Samivel, mum, agen and agen," 
returned the old gentleman, " to purwide him at my own 
cost vith a suit o clothes as 'ud be the makin' on him, and 
form his mind in infancy for those pursuits as I hope the 
family o' the Vellers vill alvays dewote themselves to. 
Tony, my boy, tell the lady wot them clothes are, as grand- 
father says father ought to let you vear." 

" A little white hat and a little sprig weskut and little 
knee cords and little top-boots and a little green coat with 
little bright buttons and a little welwet collar," replied Tony, 
with great readiness and no stops. 

" That's the cos-toom, mum," said Mr. Weller, looking 
proudly at the housekeeper. " Once make sich a model on 
him as that, and you'd say he zvos a angel ! " 

Perhaps the housekeeper thought that in such a guise 
young Tony would look more like the angel at Islington than 
anything else of that name, or perhaps she was disconcerted 
to find her previously conceived ideas disturbed, as angels are 



152 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

not commonly represented in top-boots and sprig waistcoats. 
She coughed doubtfully, but said nothing. 

" How many brothers and sisters have you, my dear ? " she 
asked, after a short silence. 

" One brother and no sister at all,"" replied Tony. " Sam 
his name is, and so's my fathers. Do you know my father ? " 

" O yes, I know him,"" said the housekeeper, graciously. 

" Is my father fond of you ? " pursued Tony. 

" I hope so," rejoined the smiling housekeeper. 

Tony considered a moment, and then said, " Is my grand- 
father fond of you ? " 

This would seem a very easy question to answer, but instead 
of replying to it, the housekeeper smiled in great confusion, 
and said that really children did ask such extraordinary 
questions that it was the most difficult thing in the world to 
talk to them. Mr. Weller took upon himself to reply that he 
was very fond of the lady ; but the housekeeper entreating 
that he would not put such things into the child's head, Mr. 
Weller shook his own while she looked another way, and 
seemed to be troubled with a misgiving that captivation was 
in progi'ess. It was, perhaps, on this account that he changed 
the subject precipitately. 

" It's wery wrong in little boys to make game o 1 their 
grandfathers, an't it, mum ? " said Mr. Weller, shaking his 
head waggishly, until Tony looked at him, when he counter- 
feited the deepest dejection and sorrow. 

" O, very sad ! " assented the housekeeper. " But I hope 
no little boys do that ? " 

" There is vun young Turk, mum," said Mr. Weller, " as 
havin' seen his grandfather a little overcome vith drink on 
the occasion of a friend's birthday, goes a reelin' and staggerin 1 
about the house, and making believe that he's the old 



" O, quite shocking ! " cried the housekeeper. 
" Yes, mum," said Mr. Weller ; " and previously to so 
doiii', this here young traitor that Fm a-speakm 1 of, pinches 



MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK 153 

his little nose to make it red, and then he gives a hiccup and 
says, ' I'm all right, 1 he says ; ' give us another song ! ' Ha, 
ha ! ' Give us another song, 1 he says. Ha, ha, ha ! " 

In his excessive delight, Mr. Weller was quite unmindful 
of his moral responsibility, until little Tony kicked up his 
legs, and laughing immoderately, cried, " That was me, 
that was ; " whereupon the grandfather, by a great effort, 
became extremely solemn. 

" No, Tony, not you," said Mr. Weller. " I hope it warn't 
you, Tony. It must ha 1 been that ""ere naughty little chap 
as comes sometimes out o' the empty watch-box round the 
corner, that same little chap as was found standing on the 
table afore the looking-glass, pretending to shave himself vith 
a oyster-knife." 

" He didn't hurt himself, I hope ? " observed the house- 
keeper. 

" Not he, mum," said Mr. Weller proudly ; " bless your 
heart, you might trust that 'ere boy vith a steam-engine 
a'most, he's such a know in* young " but suddenly recollecting 
himself and observing that Tony perfectly understood and 
appreciated the compliment, the old gentleman groaned and 
observed that " it wos all wery shockin' wery." 

" O, he's a bad 'un," said Mr. Weller, " is that 'ere watch- 
box boy, makin' such a noise and litter in the back yard, he 
does, waterin' wooden horses and feedin' of 'em vith grass, and 
perpetivally spillin' his little brother out of a veelbarrow and 
frightenin' his mother out of her vits, at the wery moment 
wen she's expectin' to increase his stock of happiness vith 
another play-feller, O, he's a bad one ! He's even gone so 
far as to put on a pair of paper spectacles as he got his father 
to make for him, and walk up and down the garden vith his 
hands behind him in imitation of Mr. Pickwick, but Tony 
don't do sich things, O no ! " 

" O no ! " echoed Tony. 

" He knows better, he does," said Mr. Weller. " He knows 
that if he wos to come sich games as these nobody wouldn't love 



154 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

him, and that his grandfather in partickler couldn't abear the 
sight on him ; for vich reasons Tony's always good." 

" Always good," echoed Tony ; and his grandfather imme- 
diately took him on his knee and kissed him, at the same 
time, with many nods and winks, slyly pointing at the child's 
head with his thumb, in order that the housekeeper, otherwise 
deceived by the admirable manner in which he (Mr. Weller) 
had sustained his character, might not suppose that any other 
young gentleman was referred to, and might clearly under- 
stand that the boy of the watch-box was but an imaginary 
creation, and a fetch of Tony himself, invented for his im- 
provement and reformation. 

Not confining himself to a mere verbal description of his 
grandson's abilities, Mr. Weller, when tea was finished, 
invited him by various gifts of pence and halfpence to smoke 
imaginary pipes, drink visionary beer from real pots, imitate 
his grandfather without reserve, and in particular to go 
through the drunken scene, which threw the old gentleman 
into ecstasies and filled the housekeeper with wonder. Nor 
was Mr. Weller's pride satisfied with even this display, for 
when he took his leave he carried the child, like some rare 
and astonishing curiosity, first to the barber's house and 
afterwards to the tobacconist's, at each of which places he 
repeated his performances with the utmost effect to applauding 
and delighted audiences. It was half-past nine o'clock when 
Mr. Weller was fast seen carrying him home upon his shoulder, 
and it has been whispered abroad that at that time the infant 
Tony was rather intoxicated. 



155 




H. K. Browne. 

Drawing on wood by " PHIZ.'' 

Tailpiece : " MB. WELLER'S WATCH CLUB RUN DOWN." 
" Master Humphrey's Clock." 1840. 



FIRST CHEAP EDITION 

OF 

L "THE PICKWICK PAPERS." 

1847. 



THE FIRST CHEAP EDITION OF THE PICKWICK 
PAPERS,' 1 1847. 

The pioneer of popular editions, this 'new departure was 
appropriately inaugurated by the republication of " The 
Pickwick Papers," the earliest cheap issue of the works of 
Charles Dickens. Much importance was attached to this 
experiment, and the reliance placed by the author himself 
upon this popular version of his writings is shown by 
Dickens's noteworthy and well-known preface to the 1847 
edition. Anticipating the avant propos now historical, due 
care was taken to herald this enterprise in advance ; a small 
8vo leaflet of four pages was issued by Chapman and Hall, 
announcing that, on Saturday, the 27th March, 1847, would 
be commenced " The Pickwick Papers " : " in weekly num- 
bers ; each containing sixteen clear and handsomely printed 
pages, small 8vo, double columns, price three halfpence each, 
and also in monthly parts, sewed in a wrapper " ; the initial 
story " Pickwick " to be completed in about thirty-two num- 
bers. The new Preface was advertised to be published with 
the concluding part. The publishers' announcement, with 
Dickens's "Address," filled three pages of the leaflet, the 
fourth side offered, as a specimen of the future series, the type 
and setting of page 2 of " Pickwick," in double columns. 

The complete story in thirty-two numbers cost four 
shillings. 

The memorable " Preface," as already quoted, according to 
this programme, did not make its welcome appearance until 
" Pickwick " was finished. It is nowadays amongst the most 
familiar of Dickens^s delightful confidences with his readers ; 
the friendly introduction was, however, in some measure 



160 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIAN A 

anticipated by a special " Address " written in advance by 
the author for the first time disclosing those motives which 
had induced the writer and publishers to venture upon 
the extended scheme of this pioneer " Cheap Edition." But 
few of these detached and fugitive " Advertisement Leaflets " 
have survived destruction ; the " Address " itself is little 
known, and seems to have escaped the attention of editors 
who have reprinted the world-familiar Prefaces to " Pick- 
wick." 



ADDRESS (1847) 

To THE CHEAP EDITION OF THE WORKS OF Mu. CHARLES 

DICKEXS. 

"Ox the 31st March, 1836, the publication of 'THE 
POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB 1 was begun, in 
what was then a very unusual form, at less than one-third of 
the price in the whole of an ordinary novel, and in Shilling 
Monthly parts. On Saturday, the 27th of March, 1847, the 
proposed Re-issue, unprecedented, it is believed, in the history 
of Cheap Literature, will be commenced. 

" It is not for an author to describe his own books. If 
they cannot speak for themselves, he is likely to do little 
service by speaking for them. It is enough to observe of 
these, that eleven years have strengthened in their writer's 
mind every purpose and sympathy he has endeavoured to 
express in them ; and that their reproduction in a shape 
which shall render them easily accessible as a possession by 
all classes of society, is at least consistent with the spirit in 
which they have been written, and is the fulfilment of a desire 
long entertained. 

" It had been intended that this CHEAP EDITION, now an- 
nounced, should not be undertaken until the books were much 
older, or the author was dead. But the favour with which 
they have been received, and the extent to which they have 
been circulated, and continue to circulate, at five times the 
proposed price, justify the belief that the living author may 
enjoy the pride and honour of their widest diffusion, and may 
couple it with increased personal emolument. 

VOL. n M 



162 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

" This belief is supported bv the conviction that the CHEAP 
EDITION will in no way clash or interfere with that already 
existing. The existing edition will always contain the 
original illustrations, which, it is hardly necessary to add, 
will constitute no part of the CHEAP EDITION ; and its form is 
perfectly distinct and different. Neither will any of the more 
recent writings of the author, those now in progress of publi- 
cation, or yet to come, appear in the CHEAP EDITION, until 
after the lapse of A VERY CONSIDERABLE PERIOD, and when 
their circulation in the original form shall, by degrees, and in 
the course of years, have placed them on a level with their 
predecessors. 

"To become, in his new guise, a permanent inmate of 
many English homes, where, in his old shape, he was only 
known as a guest, or hardly known at all, to be well thumbed 
and soiled in a plain suit that will bear a great deal, by 
children and grown people, at the fireside and on the journey : 
to be hoarded on the humble shelf where there are few books, 
and to lie about in libraries like any familiar piece of house- 
hold stuff' that is easy of replacement : and to see and feel 
this not to die first, or grow old and passionless, must obvi- 
ously be among the hopes of a living author, venturing on 
such an enterprise. Without such hopes it never could be 
set on foot. I have no fear of being mistaken in acknowledg- 
ing that they are mine ; that they are built, in simple earnest- 
ness and grateful faith, on my experience, past and present, 
of the cheering on of very many thousands of my countrymen 
and countrywomen, never more numerous or true to me than 
now ; and that hence this CHEAP EDITION is projected. 

" CHA11LES DICKENS." 



C. R. LESLIE, R.A. 



M 2 



PAINTING BY C. R. LESLIE, R.A. 

"Mil. PICKWICK DISCOVERED BY HIS FRIENDS WITH MRS. 
BARDELL FAINTING IN HIS ARMS." (Chap. XII.) 

Engraved on wood by J. Thompson. 

Frontispiece to the first cheap edition of " The Posthumous 
Papers of the Pickwick Club." 1847. 

(Printed in double columns.) 

NOTE. This picture, a monochrome in brown (gr'waille) 
painted in oils on panel, was a commission from Charles 
Dickens to the artist, C. R. LESLIE, R.A. Leslie^s painting 
continued in Dickens^s possession to his death, when it was 
sold, 9th July, 1870, with other works of art from " Gadshill," 
at Messrs. Christie's Rooms, realising j?137 11s. It has since 
passed into the possession of Mr. William Wright, whose 
comprehensive collection of Dickens memorials forms the 
most important and valuable gathering known to the writer. 
We are indebted to the generosity and public spirit of Mr. 
Wright for thus enabling these interesting resources to appear 
in the present series. 



167 




w a 
S 



< g 8 o 

" * 

S ^ c ^ 



s r -: 

^ c 



. 
tf s- 



.2 a r; 



Illustrations (woodcuts) to the 1847 earliest cheap 
edition of " The Pickwick Papers."" 

ORIGINAL ADVERTISEMENT. 1847. 



NOW PUBLISHING. 

SIX ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS, 

To bind with the Volume of 
THE CHEAP EDITION OF 

"THE PICKWICK PAPEKS." 

Engraved on wood, from drawings 

BY " PHIZ." 
Sewed in a wrapper^ price One Shilling'. 

The illustrations by " PHIZ " in the original editions of 
these papers have become so thoroughly identified with the 
characters, as to make it quite impossible for any other artist 
successfully to portray them without an imitation of his 
conceptions. 

To ensure the careful execution of these drawings, the most 
talented artists of the graver have been employed on them, 
under the superintendence of Messrs. Collins and Reynolds, to 
whom also the printing has been entrusted. 

Orders received by Darton and Co., Holborn Hill ; Joseph 
Cundall, 19, Old Bond Street ; and all Booksellers. 

%* Six illustrations to "NICHOLAS NICKLEBY" are nearly 
ready, by the same artist. 



" PHIZ " 
EXTRA PLATES 



PHIZ " EXTRA ILLUSTRATIONS. 1847. 

SERIES of six designs, by Hablot K. Browne, issued as 
" extra plates," simultaneously with the appearance of the 
first cheap edition of " Pickwick," to which the woodcut, 
engraved by J. Thompson after the picture by C. R. Leslie, 
R.A., forms the frontispiece. These spirited examples by 
" PHIZ " are often found bound up with the early " cheap 
edition " (printed in double columns), 1847. They were 
issued separately as " Pickwick Illustrations," small 8vo, 
green wrapper, price l.v. London : Chapman and Hall. 
Undated [1847]. 

NOTE. The six designs were issued as a separate specula- 
tion ; it has been stated, whether wrongly or rightly it is 
now difficult to determine, that the publishers were merely 
acting as agents in the matter for the interests of the designer 
and the respective wood-engravers concerned in their pro- 
duction, whose speculation it was. These admirable versions 
are now scarce, and priced at costly figures in consequence of 
their rarity, especially in the wrapper form. 



LIST OF EXTRA "PICKWICK" ILLUSTRATIONS 
DESIGNED BY "PHIZ" 

To accompany the earliest " Cheap Edition," published 
in 1847. 

MR. WINKLE'S FIRST SHOT SHOOTING AT THE CKOW AND WOUND- 
ING THE PIGEON. Chap. VII 1 

THE EFFECTS OF COLD PUNCH A PLEASANT DAY WITH AN UN- 
PLEASANT TERMINATION. Chap. XIX 2 

THE KlSS UNDER THE MISTLETOE KEEPING UP CHRISTMAS FES- 
TIVITIES AT MR. WARDLE'S. Chap. XXVIII 3 

OLD WELLER AT THE TEMPERANCE MEETING THE BRICK LANE 
BRANCH OF THE U.G.J.E.T.A. Chap. XXXIII 4 

THE LEG OF MUTTON "SWARRY" AT BATH. Chap. XXXVII. ... 5 

MR. PICKWICK'S PARTING INTERVIEW WITH MESSRS. DODSON AND 
FOGG AT MR. PERKER'S CHAMBERS IN GRAY'S INN SQUARE. 
Chap. LIII 6 



175 




Drawn by Hablot Knight Browne" PHIZ." 
" The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

" MR. WINKLE'S I^IRST SHOT." 

" Shooting at the crow and wounding the pigeon." (Chap. VII.) 
Published 1847. 



17' 




Drawn by Hablot Knight Browne" PHIZ." 
"The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

" THE EFFECTS OF COLD PUNCH." 

' A pleasant day, with nn unpleasant termination." (Chap. XIX.) 
Publishel 1847. 



VOL. II 



179 




Drawn by HablOt Knight Jirownu "Piuz." 
"The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

"THE KlSS UNDER THE MISTLETOE." 

Keeping up Christinas festivities at Mr. Wardle's." (Chap. XXV11I.) 
Published 1847. 



181 







Drawn by Hablot Knight Browne "Pmz." 

".The Posthvmious Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

" OLD Mu. WEM.ER AT THE TEMPERANCE MKETINC." 

'The Brick Lane Branch of the United Grand Junction Ebenexer Temperance Asso 

ciation." (Chap. XXX HI.) 

Published 1847. 



183 




Drawn by Hablot Knight Browne" PHIZ." 
" The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
' THE LEO OF MUTTON ' SWARRY ' AT BATH." (Chap. XXXVII. 
Published 1847. 



185 




Drawn by Hablot Knight Browne" PHIZ. 
"The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
; MR. PICKWICK'S PARTING INTERVIEW WITH MESSRS. DODHON AND Fooo AT MR. PERKER'S 

CHAMBERS." 

" You are a couple of mean, rascally, pettifogging robbers ! " 

(" A great morning of business in Gray's Inn Square.") (Chap. LIII.) 

Published 1847. 



Designed for binding with the cheap edition of " Pickwick. 11 

PICKWICK PICTURES. 

ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS TO "THE PICKWICK 

PAPERS." 

(Anonymous. ) 

PUBLISHED BY W. STRANGE, PATEUXOSTEU Row. 

Four parts in all. Undated. 
[This issue appeared in 1847.] 



Designed for binding with the cheap edition of " Pickwick." 

1847. 



ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS TO "THE PICKWICK 

PAPERS." 

[No name given, either of designer or wood-engraver, 
though the execution of the wrapper-block (frontispiece) is 
described as above the average of Avork characteristic of the 
time, and is the most creditable part of the production.] 

Sixteen woodcut illustrations (artist anonymous), with full- 
page block as frontispiece (also used on green wrapper). 
Advertised on wrapper to be completed in eight monthly 
parts, each part to contain four engravings. 

N.B. The Editor has hitherto failed to discover the work 
in its completed state ; the four parts here given, containing 
sixteen illustrations, are all that he has seen, though he has 
met several sets of these sixteen blocks as described. It is a 
question whether the venture was sufficiently successful to 
justify its further extension as advertised by the publisher. 



190 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIAN A 

Bound in a green wrapper, bearing a full-page woodcut 
design, reproducing fourteen portraits of principal characters 
from *' Pickwick. 11 

Price Eightpence. 

ILLUSTRATIONS FOR BINDING WITH THE C'HKAP EDITION OF Tin: 
AVoiiKs OF MR. CHARLES DICKENS. 

SIXTEEN ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS 



POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK 

CLUB. 

MR. TUPMAX AND JlX(JLE AT THK CHAKITY BALL 1 

THE PICKWICKIAXS' FIRST INTERVIEW WITH JIXCLE 2 

THE POOR PANTOMIMIST 3 

THE JOURNEY TO DINOLEY DELL 4' 

SAM WELLER DESCRIBING; DOCTORS' CO.MMOXS 5 

THE ELOPEMENT (i 

THE ELECTION AT EATAXSWILL 7 

MR. PICKWICK'S IMMORTAL DISCOVERY 8 

MRS. LEO HUNTER'S FETE CHAMPKTRK 

.JOB TROTTER BETRAYING HIS MASTER 10 

MR. PICKWICK TRESPASSING; 11 

THE OLD MAN'S TALE ABOUT THE QUEER CLIENT 12 

MR. PICKWICK IN AN AWKWARD SITUATION - 13 

WELLER AND Sox ENJOYING: THEMM:L\I:S 14 

MR. PICKWICK RETURNING; FROM THE ICE 15 

HOB SAWYER'S LANDLADY "CETTING; THE STEAM UP"' 16 

London: W. STRANGE, 21, Paternoster Row; and all Rook- 
sellers in Town and Country. 

Shortly will lie published sixteen additional engravings, 
forming a series of thirty-two illustrations, the best and 
cheapest to bind with the new edition of " Pickwick. 1 " 



OFFICE, I, YORK STREET. 

COYEST. GARDEN: 

W. STRANGE, 21, PATERNOSTER BOW; 
And Sold by all Booksellers. 




The wrapper and frontispiece (issued with the sixteen original woodcut illustrations), 
reproducing fourteen character portraits of the principal personages in " The Pickwick 
Papers." 



193 




Pickwick Pictures. 
Origin?! illustrations to " The Pickwick Papers." 

' THE PlCKWIOKlANS' FIRST INTERVIEW WITH JlNGLE." (Chap. II.) 



VOL. II 



195 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers." 
' MR. TUPMAN AND JINGLE AT THE CHARITY BALL." (Chap. II.) 



197 




Pickwick Pictures.!'. 

Original illustrations to " The Pickwick Paper 
"THE POOR.PANTOMIMIST." (Chap HI.) 



199 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to " The Pickwick Papers. 
" THE JOURNEY TO DINOLEY DELL." (Chap. V. 



201 




Pickwick ^Pictures. 

Original illustrations to " The Pickwick Papers.' 
NEWS OF THE ELOPEMENT OF Miss WARDLE WITH JINGLE." (Chap. IX.) 



203 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to " The Pickwick Papers." 
"SAM WELLER DESCRIBING DOCTORS' COMMONS." (Chap. X.) 



205 




Pickwick'Pietures. 



ncKwicK_.neiures. 
Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers/' 
' ME. PICKWICK'S IMMORTAL ANTIQUARIAN DISCOVERY." (( 



(Chap. XI. 



207 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers." 
" THE ELECTION AT EATANSWILL." (Chap. XIII.) 



209 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers.' 
'MRS. LEO HUNTER'S FETE CnAMpfrrRE." (Chap. XV.) 



VOL. II 



211 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers." 
'JoB TROTTER BETRAYINO HIS MASTER." (Chap. XVI.) 



213 




Pickwick Pictuics. 

Original illustrations to " The Pickwick Pupers." 
"Ms. PICKWICK TRESPASSING." (Chap. XIX.) 



215 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers." 
1 THE OLD MAN'S TALE ABOUT THE QUEER CLIENT." (Chap. XXI.) 



217 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers." 
" MR. PICKWICK IN AN AWKWARD SITUATION." (Chap. XX11.) 



219 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers. ' 
' WELLER AND BON ENJOYING THEMSELVES." (Chap. XXIII.) 



221 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to " The Pickwick papers." 
(' MB. PICKWICK RETURNING FROM THE ICE." (Chap. XXX.) 



223 




Pickwick Pictures. 

Original illustrations to "The Pickwick Papers.' 
' BOB SAWYER'S LANDLADY ' GETTING THE STEAM UP.' " (Chap. XXXII.) 



SIR JOHN GILBERT 



VOT,. IT 



APPLEYARD'S EDITION. 

THIETY-TWO PLATES 

To ILLUSTRATE THE CHEAP EDITION OF THE 

POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB 



BY 

CHARLES DICKENS. 



FROM ORIGIXAL DESIGNS BY JOHN GILBERT 
(Later Sir John Gilbert, R.A.) 

ENGRAVED ON WOOD BY MESSRS. GREEXAWAY AND WRIGHT. 



LONDON : 

E. APPLEYARD, Publisher, 86, Farringdon Street. 
Undated. (1847.) 



(i 2 



LIST OF THIRTY-TWO ILLUSTRATIONS BY SIR JOH\ GILBERT, R.A. 

TO 

THH- POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB. 

THE PICKWICKIANS. Chap. 1 1 

MR. PICKWICK'S EXCITEMENT AT THE ABRUPT DEPARTURE OF DR. 

PAYNE. Chap. Ill 2 

THE PARTY AT THE REVIEW. Chap. IV 3 

MR. WINKLE'S FEATS OF HORSEMANSHIP. Chap. V 4 

THE CONVICT'S RETURN. Chap. VI 5 

MR. SAMUEL WELLER. Chap. X 6 

MR. TUPMAN TURNS ANCHORITE, AND IS VlSITED IN HIS RETREAT BY 

HIS FRIENDS. Chap. XI 7 

ELECTION FOR EATANSWILL. Chap. XIII 8 

SAM WELLER'S FIRST INTERVIEW WITH JOB TKOTTER. Chap. XVI. 9 

MR. ALFRED JINGLE AND JOB TROTTER. Chap. XVI 10 

MR. PICKWICK AT THE ESTABLISHMENT FOR YOUNG LADIES. Chap. 

XVI 11 

CAPTAIN BOLDWIG DISCOVERS MR. PICKWICK ASLEEP IN HIS GROUNDS. 

Chap. XIX 12 

"Wv, SAMMY," SAID THE FATHER, "I HAN'T SEEN YOU FOR TWO 

YEAR AND BETTER.'' Chap. XX 13 

THE STORY OF THE QUEER CLIENT. Chap. XXI ... 14 

MR. PICKWICK FINDS HIMSELF IN THE WRONG BEDROOM. Chap. XXII. 13 
THE FIRST PASSAGE IN MR. SAMUEL WELLER'S FIRST LOVE. 

Chap. XXV 16 

REV. MR. STIGGINS. Chap. XXVII 17 

MR. PICKWICK AND THE OLD LADY PROVE THAT THEIR DANCING DAYS 

ARE NOT OVER. Chap. XXVIII 18 

GRAND CAROUSE IN HONOUR OF MR. PICKWICK'S ESCAPE FROM THE 

ICE. Chap. XXX 19 

SAM WELLER COMPOSES HIS FIRST LOVE-LETTER. Chap. XXXIII.... 20 

THE SOIREE OF THE BATH FOOTMEN. Chap. XXXVII 21 

SAM'S DETERMINATION NOT TO LEAVE MR. WINKLE. Chap. XXXVIII 22 

MR. PICKWICK IN THE SPONGING HOUSE. Chap. XL 23 

MR. SMANGLE. Chap. XLI 24 

MR. WELLER CONSULTS HIS FRIEND LEARNED IN THE LAW. Chap. 

XLIII 25 

THE RELEASE OF THE POOR CHANCERY PRISONER. Chap. XLIV. ... 26 

SAM'S CHRISTIAN VENGEANCE ON JOB TROTTER. Chap. XLV. ... 27 

MR. PICKWICK LEAVING THE FLEET. Chap. XLVH 28 

THE BAGMAN'S STORY. Chap. XLIX 29 

SAM FINDS IT DIFFICULT TO DECIPHER HIS FATHER'S LETTER WITH- 
OUT ASSISTANCE. Chap. LII 30 

MR. WELLER'S HORROR AND ALARM AT THE ATTENTIONS OF THE 

BUXOM FEMALE. Chap. LII 31 

THE FAT BOY (OUSIDE MR PERKER'S CHAMBERS). Chap. LIV. .,. 32 



32 PLATES. 



APPLEYARD'S EDITION. 



COMPLETE, Is. 6d. 



PLATES 

TO ILLUSTRATE THE CHEAP EDITION 

OF THE 

POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB 
BY MR CHARLES DICKENS 

FROM ORIGINAL DESIGNS BY JOHN GILBERT, ESQ. 




ENGRAVED BY MESSRS. GREENAWAY AND WRIGHT. 
LONDON : E. APPLEYARD, PUBLISHER, 86, FARRINGDON STREET. 



231 




Illustrated by Sir John (iilbjrt, 1{.A. 

'1'osthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 

"THE PICKWICKIANS." (Chap. I.) 



233 




Illustrated by Sir John CJilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

'MR. PICKWICK'S EXCITEMENT AT THE ABRUPT DEPARTURE OF DR. PAYNE." (Chap. III.) 



235 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R. A. 
"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Clu' 1 ." 
"THE PARTY AT THE REVIEW," (Chap. IV.) 



237 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' Mr. WINKLE'S FEATS OF HORSEMANSHIP." (Chap. V. 



239 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 

"THE CONVICT'S_RETURN." (Chap. VI.) 



241 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, U.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

"Jin. SAMUEL WELLER." (Chap. X.) 



VOL. II 



243 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, K.A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' MK. TCP.MAN TURNS ANCHORITE AND is VISITED IN HIS RETREAT BY uis FRIENDS. 
(Chap. XI.> 



it 2 



245 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 
' Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

'ELECTION FOR EATANSWILL." (Chap. XIII.) 



247 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 
:l Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club.' 
WELI.ER'S FIRST INTERVIEW WITH JOB TROTTER." (Chap. XVI.) 



249 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' MR. ALFRED JINGLE AND JOB TROTTER." (Chap. XVf.) 




Illustrated by Sirjlohn Gilbert, R. A. 

"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

'MR. PICKWICK AT THE ESTABLISHMENT FOR YOUNG LADIES." (Chap. XVI.) 



253 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

'CAPTAIN BOLDWIG DISCOVERS MR. PICKWICK ASLEEP ON ins GROUNDS." (Chap. XIX.) 



255 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 

"OLD WELLER." 
' Wy, Sammy," said the father, " I ha'u't seen you for two year and better." Chap. XX. 



257 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

'THE STORY OF THE QUEER CLIENT." (Chap. XXI.) 



VOL. II 



259 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

1 MR. PICKWICK FINDS HIMSELF IN THE WRONG BEDROOM." (Chap. XX11.) 



S 2 



261 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' THE FIRST PASSAGE IN MR. SAMUEL WELLBR'S FIRST LOVE." (Chap. XXV.), 



263 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbsrt, R.A. 

' Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club.'' 

"REV. MR. STIGOINS." (Chap. XXVII.) 



265 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' MB. PICKWICK AND THE OLD LADY PROVE THAT THEIR DANCING DAYS ARE NOT 
OVER." (Chap. XXVIII.) 



267 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
GRAND CAROUSE IN HONOUR OF MR. PICKWICK'S ESCAPE FROM THE ICE." (Chap. XXX.) 



269 




lUustrated by Sir John Gilbert, It. A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 
' SAM WELLEB COMPOSES HIS FIRST LOVE-LETTER." (Chap. XXXIII.) 



271 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

THE Soiree OF THE UATH FOOTMEN." (Chap. XXXVII.) 



273 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' SAM'8 DETERMINATION NOT TO LEAVE MR. WlNKLE." (Chap. XXXVIII.) 



VOL. II 



275 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R. A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
' MB. PICKWICK IN THE SPONGING HOUSE." (Chap. XL.) 



277 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, K.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 

" MR. SMANGLE." (Chap. XLI.) 



279 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' MR. WELLER CONSULTS HIS FRIEND LEARNED IN THE LAW." (Chap. XLIII.) 



2S1 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

'THE RELEASE OF THE POOR CHANCERY PRISONER." (Chap. XLIV.) 



283 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 

' SAM'S CHRISTIAN VENGEANCE ON JOB TROTTER." (Chap. XLV.) 



285 



\ 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' MR. PICKWICK LEAVING THK FLEET." (Chap. XLVII.) 



287 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R. A. 

"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 

" THE BAGMAN'S STORY." (Chap. XLIX.) 



289 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, K.A. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' SAM FINDS IT DIFFICULT TO DECIPHER HIS FATHER'S LETTER WITHOUT ASSISTANCE." (Chap. 

LII.) 



VOL. It 



291 




Illustrated by. Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

' MB. WELLER'S HORROR AND ALARM AT THE ATTENTIONS OF THE BUXOM FEMALE." (Chap. 

LIT.) 
" Here the speaker looked affectionately at the elder Mr. Weller." 



u 2 



293 




Illustrated by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. 

' Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 

" THE FAT BOY." (Chap. LIV.) 



HARLOT KNIGHT BROWNE" PHIZ ' 



"PHIZ" VIGNETTES, 1858-59 

H. K. Browne executed a fresh series of twenty-two water- 
colour drawings on a miniature scale, very delicately finished, 
to serve as " vignettes " for " The Library Edition " of 
Dickens's works, as issued by Messrs. Chapman and Hall, 
in 1858-59, in twenty-two volumes. 

The new series of " PHIZ " designs, on a reduced scale, were 
engraved on steel in a highly finished and spirited style. The 
respective engravings each appeared on a separate plate, 
without any further inscription, and these were used as 
vignettes on the title-page to each volume ; titles and letter- 
press being worked separately, and printed in type on the 
spaces left blank above and below the delicate little illustra- 
tions in question. 



FIRST "LIBRARY EDITION' 1 185859 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

" New and complete Edition of' the works of Mr. Charles 
Dickens. 

" On the First of January, 1858, will be published the first 
Monthly Volume, price Six Shillings, of a new and complete 
Library Edition of the works of Mr. Charles Dickens, beauti- 
fully printed in Post Octavo, and carefully revised by the 
Author. 

" This Library Edition is undertaken with a view of the 
presentation of the whole of Mr. Dickens's writings in a far 
more convenient form, at once for present perusal and for 
presentation, than any of these have yet appeared in. A new 
fount of type has been made expressly for the purpose, and 
great care has been taken to render the series legible, compact, 
and handsome. 

" The Library Edition will comprise twenty-two monthly 
volumes, price six shillings each ; and a volume will be 
published on the first of every month. Chapman and Hall, 
19 Piccadilly ; and Bradbury and Evans, 11 Bouverie Street." 

The first volume of this series appeared with a dedication 
to John Forster. 

" The Pickwick Papers " were issued in two volumes ; the 
title-page to each volume presented a fresh design by H. K. 
Browne, engraved on a reduced scale, as a vignette, the title, 
etc., being printed in type. 

The two " Pickwick Vignettes,"" apart from the original 
context, as described, are offered in this place : 

Vol. I. Yard of the Bull Inn, Whitechapel ; Mr. Pickwick 
setting out for Ipswich by Tony Welter's coach. 

Vol. II. Sam and Mary : Sam finds it difficult to decipher 
his father's letter without assistance. 



299 




" PHIZ " Vignettes. 

" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

" YARD OF THE 'BULL INN,' WHITECHAPBL." (Chap. XXII.) 

" Mr. Pickwick setting out for Ipswich by Tony Weller's coach." 

These vignettes were used on the title-pages of the " Library Edition," 1858 



301 




" PHIZ/' Vignettes. 
" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

" SAM AKD MARY." (Chap. LII.) 

" 8am finds it difficult to decipher his father's letter without assistance." 
These vignettes were used on the title-pages of the " Library Edition," 185S. 



PHIZ." HABLOT KNIGHT BROWNE 

" PHIZ'S " ILLUSTRATIONS TO THE HOUSEHOLD EDITION (1874) 

OF 

THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB 

Vignette on Title-page "MR. PICKWICK AWAKENING IN THE 
POUND." Frontispiece 307 

"'COME ON,' SAID THE CAB-DRIVER, SPARRING AWAY LIKE CLOCK- 
WORK. ' COME ON ALL FOUR ON YOU ! ' " Chap. II 309 

"CHARITY BALL AT THE BULL INN, ROCHESTER 'WHAT! INTRO- 
DUCING HIS FRIEND!'" Chap. II 311 

" THE REVIEW MR. SNODGRASS AND MR. WINKLE EACH PER- 
FORMED A COMPULSORY SOMMERSET WITH REMARKABLE 

AGILITY." Chap. IV 313 

"THE REFRACTORY STEED THE HORSE NO SOONER BEHELD MR. 
PlCKWICK ADVANCING WITH THE CHAISE WHIP IN HIS HAND." 
Chap. V 315 

" MR. TUPMAN HAD SAVED THE LIVES OF INNUMERABLE INOFFEND- 
ING BIRDS BY RECEIVING A PORTION OF THE CHARGE IN HIS 

LEFT ARM." Chap. VII 317 

"MR. WARDLE LOOKED ON IN SILENT WONDER." Chap. VII. ... 319 
"MR. TUPMAN LOOKED ROUND. THERE WAS THE FAT BOY." 

Chap. VIII 321 

"OLD WARDLE, WITH A HIGHLY INFLAMED COUNTENANCE, WAS 

GRASPING THE HAND OF A STRANGE GENTLEMAN." Chap. VIII. 323 

"SAM STOLE A LOOK AT THE INQUIRER." Chap. X 325 

" GOD BLESS ME! WHAT'S THE MATTER?" Chap. XI 327 

"'TAKE THIS LITTLE VILLAIN AWAY!' SAID THE AGONISED MR. 

PICKWICK." Chap. XII 329 

"THE ELECTION 'HE HAS COME OUT,' SAID LITTLE MR. PERKER, 

GREATLY EXCITED." Chap. XIII 331 

" THE CHAIR WAS AN UGLY OLD GENTLEMAN ; AND WHAT WAS 

MORE, HE WAS WINKING AT TOM SMART." Chap. XIV 333 

' ' THE HEROIC MAN ACTUALLY THREW HIMSELF INTO A PARALYTIC 

ATTITUDE, CONFIDENTLY SUPPOSED BY THE TWO BYSTANDERS TO 

HAVE BEEN INTENDED AS A POSTURE OF SELF-DEFENCE." 

Chap. XV 335 

"'PERMIT ME TO INTRODUCE MY FRIENDS MR. TUPMAN MR. 

WINKLE MR. SNODGRASS, &c.' " Chap. XV. : ...337 



304 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

" MR. WELLER WAS DISPELLING ALL THE FEVERISH REMAINS OF 
THE PREVIOUS EVENING'S CONVIVIALITY, WHEN HE WAS AT- 
TRACTED BY THE APPEARANCE OF A YOUNG FELLOW IN MUL- 
BERRY-COLOURED LIVERY." Chap. XVI 339 

"THE DOOR WAS JUST GOING TO BE CLOSED IN CONSEQUENCE, WHEN 
AN INQUISITIVE BOARDER, WHO HAD BEEN PEEPING BETWEEN 
THE HINGES, SET UP A FEARFUL SCREAMING. Chap. XVI. ... 341 

"OLD LOBBS GAVE IT ONE TUG, AND OPEN IT FLEW, DISCLOSING 
NATHANIEL PIPKIN, STANDING BOLT UPRIGHT INSIDE, AND 
SHAKING WITH APPREHENSION FROM HEAD TO FOOT." Chap. 
XVII. 343 

"'WHO ARE YOU, YOU RASCAL?' SAID THE CAPTAIN, ADMINISTER- 
ING SEVERAL POKES TO MR. PlCKWICK'S BODY WITH THE THICK 

STICK. 'WHAT'S YOUR NAME?'" Chap. XIX 345 

"MR. PICKWICK IN THE POUND. 'WHERE AM I?'" Facsimile of 
the Original Drawing. Unpublished. Chap. XIX 347 

"'YOU JUST COME AVAY,' SAID MR. WELLER. ' BATTLEDOOR AND 

SHUTTLECOCK'S A WERY GOOD GAME VHEN YOU AIN'T THE 
SHUTTLECOCK AND TWO LAWYERS THE BATTLEDORES,' &C." 

Chap. XX 349 

" ' HEYLING !' SAID THE OLD MAN WILDLY. ' MY BOY, HEYLING, MY 

DEAR BOY, LOOK, LOOK!'" Chap. XXI 351 

" STANDING BEFORE THE DRESSING-GLASS WAS A MIDDLE-AGED LADY 

IN YELLOW CURL PAPERS." Chap. XXII 353 

" MR. PICKWICK NO SOONER PUT ON HIS SPECTACLES, THAN HE AT 
ONCE RECOGNISED IN THE FUTURE MRS. MAGNUS THE LADY INTO 
WHOSE ROOM HE HAD SO UNWARRANTABLY INTRUDED OX THE 
PREVIOUS NIGHT." Chap. XXIV 355 

" A COMPLIMENT WHICH MR. WELLER RETURNED BY KNOCKING HIM 
DOWN OUT OF HAND, HAVING PREVIOUSLY, WITH THE UTMOST 
CONSIDERATION, KNOCKED DOWN A CHAIRMAN FOR HIM TO LIE 

UPON." Chap. XXIV 357 

"THE KITCHEN DOOR OPENED, AND IN WALKED MR. JOB TROTTER." 

Chap. XXV. ... 359 

" SAM LOOKED AT THE FAT BOY WITH GREAT ASTONISHMENT, BUT 

WITHOUT SAYING A WORD." Chap. XXVIII 361 

' BEFORE MR. PICKWICK DISTINCTLY KNEW WHAT WAS THE MATTER, 
HE WAS SURROUNDED BY THE WHOLE BODY, AND KISSED BY EVERY 
ONE OF THEM." Chap. XXVIII 363 

" THE STORY OF THE GOBLINS WHO STOLE A SEXTON SEATED ON AN 
UPRIGHT TOMBSTONE, CLOSE TO HIM, WAS A STRANGE UNEARTHLY 
FIGURE." Chap. XXIX 365 

" END OF MR. WINKLE'S SKATING ' I WISH YOU'D LET ME BLEED 
YOU,' SAID MR. BENJAMIN, WITH GREAT EAGERNESS. ' TAKE HIS 

SKATES OFF,' SAID MR. PlCKWICK, IN A STERN VOICE." Original 

Drawing. Unused. Chap. XXX 367 



"PHIZ" HOUSEHOLD EDITION, 1874 305 

"MR. PICKWICK WENT SLOWLY AND GRAVELY DOWN THE SLIDE, 

WITH HIS FEET ABOUT A YARD AND A QUARTER APART." 

Chap. XXX 369 

" BOB SAWYER'S BACHELOR PARTY A LITTLE FIERCE WOMAN, ALL 

IN A TREMBLE WITH PASSION, AND PALE WITH RAGE." Chap. 

XXXII 371 

" SAM WELLER'S VALENTINE MR. WELLER, SENIOR, WITH A COUN- 
TENANCE GREATLY MOLLIFIED BY THE SOFTENING INFLUENCE OF 

TOBACCO, REQUESTED SAM TO FIRE AWAY." Chap. XXXIII. ... 373 
"BEFORE SAM COULD INTERFERE TO PREVENT IT, HIS HEROIC PARENT 
HAD PENETRATED INTO A REMOTE CORNER OF THE ROOM, AND 

ATTACKED THE REVEREND MR. STIGGINS WITH MANUAL DEX- 
TERITY." Chap. XXXIII 375 

"AN ADMONITORY GESTURE FROM PERKER RESTRAINED HIM, AND 
HE LISTENED TO THE LEARNED GENTLEMAN'S CONTINUATION WITH 
A LOOK OF INDIGNATION." Chap. XXXIV 377 

" THE ASSEMBLY ROOMS, BATH POOR MR. PICKWICK ! HE HAD 
NEVER PLAYED WITH THREE THOROUGH-PACED FEMALE CARD- 
PLAYERS BEFORE." Chap. XXXV 379 

" HE NO SOONER HEARD THE HORRIBLE THREAT OF THE VALOROUS 

DOWLER, THAN HE BOUNCED OUT OF THE SEDAN." Chap. XXXVI. 381 

" MR. TUCKLE, DRESSED OUT WITH COCKED-HAT AND STICK, DANCED 
THE FROG HORNPIPE AMONG THE SHELLS ON THE TABLE." 

Chap. XXXVII 383 

" MR. BOB SAWYER'S BOY PEEVED THROUGH THE GLASS DOOR, AND 

THUS LISTENED AND LOOKED ON AT THE SAME TIME." Chap. 

XXXVIII 385 

" ' UNLOCK THAT DOOR, AND LEAVE THIS ROOM IMMEDIATELY, SIR,' 

SAID MR. WINKLE." Chap. XXXVIII 387 

" ' MY DEAR,' SAID MR. PICKWICK, LOOKING OVER THE WALL, AND 

CATCHING SIGHT OF ARABELLA, " DON'T BE FRIGHTENED, MY 

DEAR.'" Chap. XXXIX 389 

" IN THE FLEET PRISON MR. PICKWICK SITTING FOR HIS PORTRAIT." 
Chap. XL 391 

" WITH THIS, THE SPEAKER SNATCHED THAT ARTICLE OF DRESS FROM 

MR. PICKWICK'S HEAD." Chap. XLI 393 

"MR. PICKWICK DISCOVERS JINGLE IN THE FLEET PRISON." Chap. 

XLII 395 

" SAM, HAVING BEEN FORMALLY INTRODUCED AS THE OFFSPRING OF 

MR. WELLER OF THE BELLE SAVAGE, WAS TREATED WITH 

MARKED DISTINCTION." Chap. XLIII 397 

" ' WILL YOU ALLOW ME TO INQUIRE W*Y YOU MAKE UP YOUR BED 

UNDER THAT 'ERE DEAL TABLE?'" SAID SAM." Chap. XLIV. ... 399 

"MR. STIGGINS, GETTING ON HIS LEGS AS WELL AS HE COULD, PRO- 
CEEDED TO DELIVER AN EDIFYING DISCOURSE." Chap. XLV. ... 401 

"MRS. BARDELL A PRISONER IN THE FLEET." Chap. XLVI. ... 403 
VOL. II X 



306 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

"RETURN OF MR. AND MRS. WlNKLE MR. PlCKWICK COCLD 
SCARCELY BELIEVE THE EVIDENCE OF HIS OWN SENSES." Chap. 

XLVII 405 

"THE STORY OF THE BAGMAN'S UNCLE." Chap. XLIX 407 

" MR. PICKWICK'S MISSION MR. BOB SAWYER WAS SEATED, NOT IN 

THE DICKEY, BUT ON THE ROOF OF THE CHAISE." Chap. L. ... 409 
"MR. BEN ALLEN BECOMING SUDDENLY AWARE THAT HE is IN THE 

PRESENCE OF A STRANGER." Chap. L 411 

'THE CONTEST BETWEEN THE RIVAL EDITORS." Chap. LI. 413 

"THE ELDER WELLER HAS A LITTLE SETTLEMENT WITH MR. 

STIGGINS." Chap. LII 415 

"MR. PICKWICK HAS A FINAL SETTLEMENT WITH DODSON AND 

FOGG." Chap. LIII 417 

"MARY ENTERTAINS THE FAT BOY AT DINNER 'I SAY, HOW NICE 

YOU LOOK!'" Chap. LIV 419 

" THE ELDER WELLER ENTERTAINS MR. SOLOMON PELL." Chap. LV. 421 
"ARABELLA AND WINKLE'S FATHER." Chap. LVI." 423 



30 1 ; 




' The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club," by Charles Dickens. 

FRONTISPIECE. Vignette. (Chap. XIX.) 

Title-page to " The Household Edition," 1874. 

With fifty-seven illustrations by "PHIZ," 



X ~ 



309 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

' COME ON,' SAID THE CAB-DRIVER, SPARRING AWAY LIKE CLOCKWORK. ' COME ON ALL 

FOUR ON YOU !'" (Chap. II.) 



311 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by "PHIZ." 

"CHARITY BALL AT THE BULL INN, ROCHESTER." 
" ' What ! introducing his friend ! ' " (Chap. II.) 



313 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"THE REVIEW/' 

" Mr. Snodgrass and Mr. Winkle each performed a compulsory summerset with 
remarkable agility." (Chap. IV.) 



315 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by "Pniz " 
" THE REFRACTORY STEED." 

' The horse no sooner beheld Mr. Pickwick advancing with the chaise whip in his 
hand." (Chap. V.) 



317 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by "Pmz." 

: MR. TUPMAN HAD SAVED THE LIVES OF INNUMERABLE UNOFFENDINQ~BIRDS BY RECEIVING 
A PORTION OF THE CHARGE IN HIS LEFT ARM." (Chap. VII.) 



319 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by "PHIZ." 
'MR. WARDLE LOOKED ON IN SILENT WONDER." (Chap. VII.) 



321 




" PosthumousJPapcrs of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by "PHIZ." 

"MR. TUPMAN LOOKED ROUND. THERE WAS THE FAT BOY." (Chap. VIII.) 



VOL. II 



Y 



323 




' Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
1 OLD MR. WARDLE, WITH A HIGHLY INFLAMED COUNTENANCE, WAS GRASPING THE HAND 

OF A STRANGE GENTLEMAN." (Chap. VIII.) 



Y 2 



325 




"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" SAM STOLE A LOOK AT THE INQUIRER." (Chap. X.) 



327 




"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
' GOD BLESS ME ! WHAT'S THE MATTER ? ' " (Chap. XI.) 



329 ' 




"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
'TAKE THIS LITTLE VILLAIN AWAY!' SAID THE AOONISKD MR. PICKWICK." (Chap. XII.) 



331 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by "PHIZ.", 

"THE ELECTION.' 
" ' He has come out,' said little Mr. Perker, greatly excited " (Chap. XIII.) 



333 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

' THE CHAIR WAS AN UGLY OLD GENTLEMAN ; AND WHAT WAS WORSE, HE WAS WINKING 

AT TOM SMART." (Chap. XIV.) 



335 




"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by "Pniz." 

"THE HEROIC MAN ACTUALLY THREW HIMSELF INTO A PARALYTIC ATTITUDE, CON- 
FIDENTLY SUPPOSED BY THE TWO BYSTANDERS TO HAVE BEEN INTENDED AS A POSTURE OF 
SELF-DEFENCE." (Chap. XV.) 



337 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

PERMIT ME TO INTRODUCE MY FRIENDS MR. TUPMAN MR. WINKLE MR. 
SNODGRASS," &c. (Chap. XV.) 



VOL. II 



339 




"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club.' 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" MR. WELLER WAS DISPELLING ALL THE FEVERISH REMAINS OK THE 
EVENING'S CONVIVIALITY WHEN HE WAS ATTRACTED BY THE APPEARANCE OF 
FELLOW IN MULBERRY-COLOURED LIVERY." (Chap. XVI.) 



K 



341 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"THE DOOR WAS JUST GOING TO BE CLOSED IN CONSEQUENCE, WHEN AN^INQUISITIVE 
BOARDER, WHO HAD BEEN PEEPING BETWEEN THE HINGES, SET UP A FEARFUI/SCKEAMING." 
(Chap. XVI.) 



343 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"OLD LOBBS GAVE IT ONE TUG, AND OPEN IT FLEW, DISCLOSING NATHANIEL PIPKIN, 
STANDING BOLT UPRIGHT INSIDE, AND SHAKING WITH APPREHENSION FROM HEAD TO 
FOOT." (Chap. XVII.) 



345 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"'WHO ARE YOU, YOU RASCAL? SAID THE CAPTAIN, ADMINISTERING SEVERAL POKES 

MR. PICKWICK'S BODY WITH THE THICK STICK. 'WHAT'S YOUR NAME?'" (Chap XIX.) 



347 




Original drawing by "PHIZ," 1874. 
Designed for "The Household Edition " of "The Pickwick Papers." 

The figure of " Mr. Pickwick " only was used in the vignette. 
"MR. PICKWICK IN THE POUND. '_WHERE AM I?' " (Chap. XIX.) 



349 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by "Pniz." 

" ' YOU JUST COME AVAY," SAID MR. WELLEE. ' BATTLEDORE AND SHUTTLECOCK'S A 
WERY GOOD GAME, VHEN YOU AN*T THE SHUTTLECOCK AND TWO LAWYERS THE BATTLE- 
DORES ! ' " (Chap. XX.) 



351 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"'HEYLINO!' SAID THE OLD MAN WILDLY. ' MY BOY, HEYLINO, MY DEAR BOY, LOOK, 
LOOK ! ' GASPING FOR BREATH, THE MISERABLE FATHER POINTED TO THE SPOT WHERE THE 
YOUNG MAN WAS STRUGGLING FOR LIFE." (Chap. XXI.) 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick t'luK" 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
"STANDING BEFORE THE DRESSING-GLASS WAS A MIDDLE-AGED LADY IN YELLOW cum 

PAPERS, BUSILY ENGAGED IN BRUSHING WHAT LADIES CALL THEIR 'BACK HAIR." 

(Chap. XXII.) 



VOL IT 



A A 



355 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club " 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" MR. PICKWICK NO SOONER PUT ON HIS SPECTACLES, THAN HE AT ONCE RECOGNISED 
IN THE FUTURE MRS. MAGNUS THE LADY INTO WHOSE ROOM HE HAD SO UNWARRANTABLY 

INTRUDED ON THE PREVIOUS NIGHT." (Chap. XXIV.) 



357 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"A COMPLIMENT WHICH MR. WELLER RETURNED BY KNOCKING HIM DOWN OUT OF 
HAND I HAVING PREVIOUSLY, WITH THE UTMOST CONSIDERATION, KNOCKED DOWN A 
CHAIRMAN FOR HIM TO LIE UPON." (Chap. XXIV.) 



359 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

'THE KITCHEN DOOR OPENED, AND IN^WALKED MR. JOB TROTTER." (Chap. XXV.) 



3fil 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

' SAM LOOKED AT THE FAT BOY WITH fiREAT ASTONISHMENT, BUT WITHOUT SAYING A WOK1). 

(Chap. XXVIII.) 



363 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

' BEFORE MR. PICKWICK DISTINCTLY KNEW WHAT WAS THE MATTER, HE WAS SURROUNDED BY 
THE WHOLE BODY, AND KISSED BY EVERY ONE OF THEM." (Chap. XXVIII.) 



365 




"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" THE STORY OF THE GOBLINS WHO STOLE A SEXTON." 

1 Seated on an upright tombstone, close to him, was a strange unearthly figure.' 
(Chap. XXIX.) 



367 



; . i 




Original drawing by " PHIZ," 1876. 

Designed for "The Household Edition " of " The Pickwick Papers. 
This drawing was not reproduced. 
" END OF MR. WINKLE'S SKATING." 

" ' I wish you'd let me bleed you,' said Mr. Benjamin, with great eagerness. ' Take his 
skates off,' said Mr. Pickwick in a stern voice." (Chap. XXX.) 



369 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" MR. PICKWICK . . . WENT SLOWLY AND ORAVELY DOWN THE SLIDE, WITH HIS FEET 
ABOUT A YARD AND A QUARTER APART, AMIDST THE GRATIFIED SHOUTS OF ALL THE SPEC- 
TATORS." (Chap. XXX.) 



VOL H. 



15 B 



371 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
" BOB SAWYER'S BACHELOR PARTY." 

'A little fierce woman bounced into the room, all in a tremble with passion, and pale 
with rage." (Chap. XXXII.) 



373 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
"SAM WELLER'S VALENTINE." 

Ir. Weller, Senior, with a countenance greatly mollified by the softening influence 
tobacco, requested Sam to fire away." (Chap. XXXIII.) 



375 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
"THE BRICK LANE BRANCH OF THE UNITED GRAND JUNCTION EBENEZER TEMPERANCE 

ASSOCIATION." 

" Before Sam could interfere to prevent it, his heroic parent had penetrated into a 
remote corner of the room, and attacked the reverend Mr. Stiggins with manual 
dexterity." (Chap. XXXIII.) 



377 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" THE MEMORABLE TRIAL OF BARDELL AGAINST PlCKWICK." 

: An admonitary gesture from Perker restrained him, and he listened to the learned 
gentleman's continuation with a look of indignation." (Chap. XXXIV.) 



379 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club.' 

Illustrated by "Pniz." 
"THE ASSEMBLY ROOMS, BATH." 

: Poor Mr. Pickwick ! he had never played with three thorough-paced female card, 
players before." (Chap. XXXV.) 



381 




"'Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" EXTRAORDINARY CALAMITY THAT BEFELL MR. WINKLE." 

He no sooner heard the horrible threat of the valorous Dowler, than he bounced out of 
the sedan." (Chap. XXXVI.) 



383 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
" THE BATH FOOTMEN'S 'SWARRY.'" 

" Mr. Tuckle, dressed out with the cocked-hat and stick, danced the frog hornpipe 
among the shells on the table." (Chap. XXXVII.) 



385 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
'MR. BOB SAWYER'S BOY PEEPED THROUGH THE GLASS DOOR, AND THUS LISTENED AND 

LOOKED ON AT THE SAME TIME." (Chap. XXXVIII.) 



VOL. II 



c c 



387 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
"SAM WELLER'S MISSION TO MR. WINKLE." 

' Unlock that door, and leave this room immediately, sir,' said Mr. Winkle." (Chap. 

XXXVIII.) 



c <: 



389 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by "PHiz." 

" ' MY DEAR,' SAID MR. PICKWICK, LOOKING OVER THE WALL, AND CATCHINS SIGHT 
OF ARABELLA ON THE OTHER SIDE, 'DON'T BE FRIGHTENED, MY DEAR. 'TIS ONLY ME.'" 
(Chap. XXXIX.) 



391 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
"!N THE FLEET PRISON MR. PICKWICK SITTING FOR HIS PORTRAIT." (Chap. XL.) 



393 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" MR. PICKWICK'S FIRST EXPERIENCES OF THE FLEET PRISON." 

" With this, the speaker snatched that article of dress from Mr. Pickwick's head. 

(Chap. XLI.) 



395 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" MR. PICKWICK DISCOVERS JINGLE IN THE FLEET PRISON." 

: Letting his hat fall on the floor, he stood perfectly fixed and immovable with astonish- 
ment." (Chap. XLII.) 



397 




"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by "PHIZ." 

3AM, HAVING BEEN FORMALLY INTRODUCED AS THE OFFSPRING OF MR. WELLER, OF THE 

BELLE SAVAGE, WAS TREATED WITH MARKED DISTINCTION." (Chap. XLIII.) 



399 




"Posthumous Papers of Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
" SAM WELLER IN THE FLEET PRISON." 

1 Will you allow uie to inquire xv'y you make up your bed under that 'ere deal table! 
said Sam." (Chap. XLIV.) 



401 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

MR. STIOGINS, GETTING ON HIS LEGS AS WELL AS HE COULD, PROCEEDED TO DELIVER 
AN EDIFYING DISCOURSE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE COMPANY." (Chap. XLV.) 



VOL* TI 



b r> 



403 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
"MRS. BARDELL A PRISONER IN THE FLEET." 

1 Mrs. Bardell screamed violently ; Tommy roared ; Mrs. Cluppins shrunk within her 
self ; and Mrs. Sanders made off without mere ado." (Chap. XLVI.) 



405 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by "Pinz.'' 
" KETURN OF MR. AND MRH. WINKLE." 
: Mr. Pickwick could scarcely believe the evidence of his own senses." (Chap. XLVII.) 



407 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
"THE STORY OF THE BAGMAN'S UNCLE." 

' These attentions were directed, not towards him, but to a young lady who just then 
appeared at the foot of the steps." (Chap. XLIX.) 



409 




"Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
" MR. PICKWICK'S MISSION." 

Mr. Bob Sawyer was seated, not in the dickey, but on the roof of the chaise." 

(Chap. L.) 



411 







" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 
Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

" THE INTERVIEW BETWEEN MR. PlCKWICK AND MR. WINKLE'S FATHER." 

' Mr. Ben Allen becoming suddenly aware that he is in the presence of a stranger 

(Chap. L.) 



413 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. " 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

SNATCHING UP A MEAL-SACK, EFFECTUALLY STOPPED THE CONFLICT BY DRAWING IT OVER 
THE HKAD AND SHOULDERS OF THE MIGHTY POTT." (Chap. LI.) 



415 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"THE ELDER WELLER HAS A LITTLE SETTLEMENT WITH MR. STIQOINS." 
" It was a still more exciting spectacle to behold Mr. Weller immersing Mr. Stiggins's 
head in a horse-trough full of water, and holding it there until he was half suffocated." 
(Chap. 111.) 



417 




<; Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. ' 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"MR. PICKWICK HAS A FINAL SETTLEMENT WITH DODSON AND Foor,.'' 
" ' I say insolent familiarity, sir,' said Mr. Pickwick, turning upon Fogg with a fierce- 
ness of gesture which caused that person to retreat towards the door with great 
expedition." (Chap. LIII.) 



VOL. II 



E E 



419 



r 




. /V//.Z. 



' Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

' MARY ENTERTAINS THE FAT BOY AT DINNER." 
' ' I say, how nice you look ! ' " (Chap. LIV.) 



E E 2 



421 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 

"TiiE ELDER WELLER ENTERTAINS MR. SOLOMON PELL." 

' The mottle-faced gentleman reviewed the company, and slowly lifted his hand 

(Chap. LV.) 



423 




" Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club." 

Illustrated by " PHIZ." 
"ARABELLA AND WINKLE'S FATHER." 

' The words were scarcely out of the old gentleman's lips, when footsteps were heard 
ascending the stairs." (Chap. LA I.) 



AUGUSTUS DULCKEN. 1861. 



SCENES FKOM " THE PICKWICK PAPERS " 

DESIGNED AND DRAWN ON STONE BY 

AUGUSTUS DULCKEN. 

LONDON : BICKERS AND BUSH, 1, LEICESTER SQUARE. 
Proofs, 10*. 6d. 



Four subjects executed in folio, drawings on stone ; 
enclosed within a tinted wrapper, decorated with sketches 
arranged in compartments. In the centre is a figure intended 
for Mr. Pickwick ; on the left-hand corner we have the rook- 
shooting incident, Wardle is seen bla/ing away at the rooks, 
while Winkle, gazing at a bird perched above his head, is 
discharging his barrel point-blank into Tupman's right arm. 
In the coiTesponding corner compartment on the right, is 
shown the tea-and-toast entertainment at the " Marquis 
o" 1 Granby "" ; the Shepherd being refreshed and comforted by 
the fireside in Mrs. Welter's " snug parlour," while Sam 
Weller is leaning over the bar on the outside, contemplating 
the voracity of Stiggins. Below, to right and left, each 
figure standing beneath a sort of Gothic bracket arrange- 



428 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

ment, are character studies, carrying out the designer's con- 
ceptions of Jingle, with his mulberry-liveried confederate, 
Job Trotter, busied with the hymn book. 

The situations selected for pictorial treatment on a large 
scale (oblong folio) are : 

1. The death of the poor prisoner, with the cobbler reading 
by his bedside ; Mr. Pickwick and Sam are seen walking into 
the dreary apartment. (Chap. XLIV.) 

" It was a large, bare, desolate room, with a number of stump bedsteads 
made of iron, on one of which lay stretched, the shadow of a man, wan, 
pale, and ghastly." (Chap. XLIV.) 

2. Stiggins's arrival at the " Grand Junction Ebenezer 
Temperance Association "" tea meeting, held in a loft : 

"'It's my opinion, Sir, that this meeting is drunk, Sir,' said Mr. 
Stiggins." (Chap. XXXII.) 

3. Sam Weller a guest at the meeting of the Bath Footmen's 
Social Club, the " Leg of Mutton Swarry," held at the green- 
grocer's rooms, " P. J. Harris : Evening Parties Attended." 

' ' Gentlemen, my friend Mr. Whiffers has resigned.' " (Chap. XXXVII.) 

4. The story about a queer client. 

" 'Heyling!' said the old man, wildly 'My boy, Heyling, my dear 
boy, look ! look ! ' Gasping for breath, the miserable father pointed to 
the spot where the young man was struggling for life." (Chap. XXI.) 



EIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS 

BY 

JOSEPH GREGO. 

[NEVER BEFORE PUBLISHED.} 

THE STORY OF THE GOBLINS WHO STOLE A SEXTON. 
Chap. XXIX. 

'THE SEXTON, GABRIEL GRUB, ON CHRISTMAS EVE, GOING TO RAISE 
HIS SPIRITS BY DIGGING A GRAVE IN THE CHURCHYARD" 431 

'WHOLE TROOPS OF GOBLINS POURED INTO THE CHURCHYARD, AND 
BEGAN PLAYING AT LEAPfROG WITH THE TOMBSTONES." 433 

'THE GOBLIN'S PICTURE GALLERY." 435 

THE STORY OF THE BAGMAN'S UNCLE. Chap. XLVIII. 

" The ghostly passengers in the ghost of a mail." 

"MR. PICKWICK AT 'THE BUSH,' BRISTOL."... 437 

"THE PASSENGERS IN THE GHOST OB' THE OLD EDINBURGH AND 
LONDON MAIL" 439 

"THE ENCOUNTER IN THE CHAMBER OF THE SOLITARY INN " 441 

"FINISH OF THE DEADLY COMBAT" 443 

"THE BAGMAN'S UNCLE AWAKENING ON THE BOX OF AN OLD DIS- 
MANTLED EDINBURGH MAIL IN THE WHEELWRIGHT'S YARD, 
EDINBURGH" . 44") 



-431 ' 




" The Story of the Goblins who Stole a Sexton." 

Illustrated by Joseph Grego. 
"THE SEXTON, GABRIEL GRUB, ON CHRISTMAS EVE, GOING TO RAISE HIS SPIRITS BY DIGGING 

A GRAVE IN THE CHURCHYARD." 

" As he went his way, up the ancient street, he saw the cheerful light of the blazing 
fires gleam through the old casements. All this was gall and wormwood to the heart of 
Gabriel Grub." (Chap. XXIX,) 



'"V - 



4fl 
!*- ! ' '^ 

^: 



V4 . 

Cl 





" The Story of the Goblins who Stole a Sexton." 

Illustrated by Joseph Grego. 

" WHOLE TROOPS OP GOBLINS POURED INTO THE CHURCHYARD, AND BEGAN PLAYING AT 
LEAP-FROG WITH THE TOMBSTONES ; NEVER STOPPING FOR AN INSTANT TO TAKE BREATH^ 
BUT 'OVERINO' THE HIGHEST AMONGST THEM, ONE AFTER THE OTHER, WITH THE MOST 

MARVELLOUS DEXTERITY." (Chap. XXIX.) 



VOL. II 



F F 



435 




"The Story of the Goblins who Stole a Sexton." 

Illustrated by Joseph Grego. 
"THE GOBLIN PICTURE GALLERY." 

' And uow,' said the Goblin King, ' show the man of misery and gloom a few of the 
pictures from our own great storehouse ! ' " (Chap. XXIX.) 



V F 



437 







"The Story of the Bagman's Uncle." 

Illustrated by Joseph Grego. 
"Ma. PICKWICK AT THE 'Bt'sii,' BRISTOL." 

"The one-eyed bagman :md the landlord drinking a bowl of bishop together." 
" ' He was a wonderful man, that uncle of yours, though,' remarked the landlord, 
shaking his head. ' Well, 1 think he was ; I think I may say he was,' answered the one- 
eyed man. ' I could tell you a story about that same uncle, gentleman, that, would rather 
surprise you.' 'Could you?' said Mr. Pickwick. 'Let us hear it, by all means.'" 
(Chap. XLVIII.) 



439 




"The Story of the Bagman's Uncle." 

Illustrated by Joseph Grego. 

"THE PASSENGERS IN THE GHOST OF THE OLD EDINBURGH AND LONDON MAIL." 
" ' Now, gentlemen,' said my uncle, taking his seat deliberately, ' I don't want to have 
any death, with or without lightning, in a lady's presence, and we have had quite blood 
and thundering enough for one journey ; so, if you please, we'll sit in our places like 
quiet insides. Here, guard, pick up that gentleman's carving-knife. Allow me to return 
you your hat, sir.'" (Chap. XLIX.) 



441 




"The Story of the Bagman's Uncle." 
Illustrated by Joseph Grego. 

" ' QUIT THE ROOM, OR YOU ARE A DEAD MAN !' SAID THE ILL-LOOKING FELLOW WITH THE 
LARGE SWORD, DRAWING IT AT THE SAME TIME, AND FLOURISHING IT IN THE AIR. ' I )OWN WITH 
HIM ! ' I'BIED THE GKNTI.KMAN IN SKV-BI.l'E, DRAWING HIS SWORD ALSO, AND FALLING I:M'K 
TWO OR THREE YARDS. ' DOWN WITH HIM!' TlIE LADY GAVE A LOUD SCREAM." (Chap. 
XLIX.) 



443 




''The Story of the Bagman's Uncle.' 
Illustrated by Joseph Grego. 

"THE LADY STEPPED LIGHTLY ASIDE, AND SNATCHING THE YOUNOrMAN'S 8WOKD FROM HIS 
HAND, BEFORE HE HAD RECOVERED HIS BALANCE, DROVE HIM TO THE WALL, AND RUNNING IT 
THROUGH HIM, AND THE PANELLING, UP TO THE VERY HILT, PINNED HIM THERE, HARD AND 
FAST. IT WAS A SPLENDID EXAMPLE. MY UNCLE, WITH A LOUD SHOUT OF TRIUMPH, AND A 
STRENGTH THAT WAS IRRESISTIBLE, MADE HIS ADVERSARY RETREAT IN THE SAME DIKKc 1 ION, 
AND PLUNGING THE OLD RAPIER INTO THE VERY CENTRE OF A LARCE KKD FLOWER IN THE 
PATTERN OF HIS WAISTCOAT, NAILED HIM BESIDE HIS FRIEND. TlIERK THEY BOTH STOOD, 
GENTLEMEN, JERKING THEFR ARMS AND LEGS ABOUT, IN AGONY LIKE THE TOY-SHOP FIGURES 
THAT ARE MOVED BY A PIECE OF PACKTHREAD." (Chap. XL1X.) 



445 



ft 
' \ 

torrl 





"The Story of the Bagman's Uncle." 

Illustrated by Joseph Grego. 

" MY UNCLE PLIED WHIP AND REIN, AND THE HORSES FLEW ONWARD TILL THEY WERK 
WHITE WITH FOAM ; AND YET THE NOISE BEHIND INCREASED ; AND YET THE YOUNG LADY 
CRIED ' FASTER ! FASTER ! ' MY UNCLE GAVE A LOUD STAMP ON THE BOOT IN THE ENERGY OF 

THE MOMENT, AND FOUND THAT IT WAS OREY MORNING, AND HE WAS SITTING IN THE 

WHEELWRIGHT'S YARD, ON THE BOX OF AN OLD EDINBURGH MAIL, SHIVERING WITH THE COLD 
\ND WET, AND STAMPING HIS FEET TO WARM THEM.' (Chap. XLIX.) 



FREDERICK W. PAILTHORFE 



Published by 
MESSRS. ROBSOX AND KERSLAKE. 

1882. 



TWENTY-FOUR ILLUSTRATIONS 

TO 

THE PICKWICK CLUB. 

BY 

FREDERICK W. PAILTHORPE. 



LONDON : 

HOBSON AND KEUSLAKE, 43 Cranbourne St., Leicester Square. 

1882. 



Ix the consistent spirit of his graphic predecessors, Mr. 
Frederick W. Pailthorpe has designed and etched numerous 
further embellishments for the illustration of the PICKWICK 
PAPERS. As has been incidentally pointed out in the progress 
of this work, that ingenious and talented artist enjoys an 
exhaustive knowledge of the famous epic, and is inspired and 
actuated by the keenest appreciation of Box's peculiar humour, 
which close study has made his own. The sentiment in which 
Mr. Pailthorpe has approached his author is obviously that of 
a reverential disciple ; without descending to plagiarism, or, as 
it may be expressed, " walking away with other men's clothes," 
his highly trained artistic and receptive faculties have enabled 
him to produce numerous freshly humorous pictures, illustrat- 
ing episodes in the resourceful chronicles of the PICKWICK 
CLUB ; incidents which, until his own graphic powers had given 
them .pictorial embodiment, had never before been illustrated. 

VOL. II G G 



450 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

The twenty-four novel designs, etched by the artist in 1882, 
were all executed in pursuance of this ambition, and have 
enjoyed select appreciation ; these " extra plates " intended 
as a supplementary contribution for the completion of the 
original series, were issued by Messrs. Robson and Kerslake. 
It must be acknowledged by all admirers and collectors of 
" Dickensiana," that Mr. Pailthorpe has admirably succeeded 
in his first intentions ; for these examples, absolutely original 
in themselves, as described illustrating passages from PICK- 
WICK which had hitherto escaped the artistic zeal of previous 
Dickens illustrators, are thoroughly in harmony with the first 
series of plates to PICKWICK, to which these etchings are a 
corollary or supplement ; they seem so completely in place 
between the suites executed by Seymour and PHIZ as to 
suggest that the artist must have designed these pictures 
contemporaneously with the original monthly parts, as issued 
in 1836 ; while the executive skill displaved in the etching 
actually harmonises with the manipulative dexterity of the 
original PICKWICK artists above-mentioned, through whose 
productions the reader, familiar with the first issues, must 
always think of Dickens^s characters. These additional em- 
bellishments, completely successful in every respect, have by 
the publishers been kept " select " by being made relatively 
expensive ; had the publishers' intentions ran in another 
channel as regards obtaining the widest circulation, it is 
evident that the artistes reputation would have been more 
popularly spread abroad, and the public delectation increased 
proportionately. 

<f By the liberality of Mr. Bartholomew Robson, the pro- 
prietor of these sprightly plates, we are enabled to reproduce 
F. W. Pailthorpe's spirited Frontispiece, with a characteristic 
specimen plate, and we further refer our readers to the list 
of the twenty-four extra subjects which constitute this 
unique and appropriate little supplement to the original 
series of plates adorning the first issue of PICKWICK, with which 
Mr. Pailthorpe's praiseworthy etchings are designed to be 



EXPLANATORY NOTE 451 

incorporated. The Editor's intentions, as concerns the prepar- 
ation of the present contribution to the subject PICTORIAL 
PICKWICKIANA dear to Dickens students, and affectionately 
regarded by Dickens level's are necessarily restricted to repro- 
ducing solely those earlier illustrations, poured forth for the 
embellishment of the favourite and phenomenally successful 
" book of the century," the various phases and early editions 
coeval with its first appearance, without aspiring to include 
recent examples, too numerous and various to be conveniently 
comprised within these limitations, and, irrespective of artistic 
merits, otherwise less interesting, as regards the past history 
of PICKWICK, than contemporary versions which bear the 
stamp of their original parentage. To the acceptable versions 
produced by this little group of original book-illustrators, 
strongly impregnated with the characteristics of Boz's youthful 
times, we feel there is neither inconsistency nor violence to 
artistic keeping, in adding these fitting productions of 
Frederick Pailthorpe, whose pride it has been to preserve the 
old-fashioned spirit of Dickens's early artistic exponents, and 
to steer clear of modern and up-to-date aspects thus neces- 
sarily out of harmony with the recognised sentiments and 
traditions of the PICKWICK CLUB. So realistic is our artist's 
fidelity to the Boz era that it is difficult to believe that Pail- 
thorpe is otherwise than the contemporary of the actual 
aboriginal Pickwickians in person. 



G G 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS DESIGNED AND ETCHED BY FREDERICK 
W. PAILTHORPE. 

Green wrapper printed with repeat of 

"FRONTISPIECE" 1 

"CAN WE PUT THIS HORSE UP HERE, MY GOOD WOMAN?" 2 

"WHAT DO YOU THINK I SEE IN THIS BLESSED ARBOUR LAST NIGHT?" 3 

"LET ME GET AT HIM, PlCKWICK ! " 4 

RECEPTION OF THE PICKWICKIANS AT EATANSWILL 5 

"DON'T GJ AWAY, MARY," SAID THE BLACK-EYED MAN 6 

TOM SMART 7 

OVER! 8 

THE PARISH CLERK 9 

COMFORTABLE QUARTERS 10 

"!T'S THE OLD 'UN!" 11 

"GOVERNOR IN?" 12 

"THE OLD GEN'LM'N AS WORE THE PIGTAIL." 13 

"GET ALONG WITH YOU, YOU OLD WRETCH!" 14 

" DID YOU SKIN THE GENTLEMAN, SIR?" 15 

PRINCE BLADUD INFORMS HIS FATHER THAT HE is ENGAGED ... 16 

THE SCIENTIFIC GENTLEMAN'S GREAT DISCOVERY 17 

"TAKE YOUR HAT OFF!" 18 

MR. PICKWICK IN THE SPONGING HOUSE 19 

THE PROCESSION TO THE FLEET ... 20 

A PLEASANT PARTY 21 

UNEXPECTED ARRIVAL OF MR. PICKWICK 22 

THE BAGMAN'S UNCLE 23 

THE FAT BOY is MYSTERIOUS... 24 



453 



ILLUSTRATE MS 




Frederick W. Pailthorpe. 
Wrapper and Frontispiece to the Pickwick Illustrations. 

Published 1882. 
Reproduced by permission of Mr. Bartholomew Robson. 



455 




Frederick W. Pailthorpe. 

THE BAGMAN'S UNCI.K. 

' The man said who picked him up that he was smiling as merrily as if he had 

tumbled out for a treat." (Chap. XLIX.) 
Reproduced by permission of Mr. Bartholomew Robsoit, 



FREDERICK W. PAILTHORPE. 



EXTEA TITLE-PAGES 



THE PICKWICK PAPERS. 



DESIGNED FOR SUPPLEMENTARY VOLUMES II., III., & IV. 



Executed for the convenience of Collectors of " Piek- 
wickiana " who are desirous of binding-lip sets of the extra 
illustrations, 1 &c., by these means extending and expanding 
the original work to Four Volumes. 



1 Illustrations by Seymour, Buss, Phiz, Leech, Crowquill, Onwhyn, and 
Pailthorpe. 




CKARL6S DICJC6JTS 








LLUSTJIATIOJfS. 
CJIOYVPUILL, 



ji , J5U5S,vPj'LlZ, 



AJ<C 



Frontispiece to extra volume of " Pickwick." 
Reproduced by permission of the designer, F. W. Pailthorpe. 




LLI/STJIATJOJTS. JbY SfiTKOUR. JiUSS.PJ-UZ, LCTL 
, OJ-fYrj-LYK AXD PJll 



Frontispiece to extra volume of " Pickwick.'' 
Reproduced by permission of the designer, F. \V. 1'iiilthorpe. 




CJ-UJIL5S DICKGSCS 





I Cf 



, jbuss, 

CJlOVYpUILL, OjfWJ-UW >>u<- 



Frontispiece to extra volume of " Pickwick." 
Reproduced by permission of the designer, F. W, Pailthorpe, 



CHARACTER SKETCHES FROM CHARLES 
DICKENS 

PORTRAYED BY "KYD" 



VOL. II H H 



PUBLLSHED HY MKSSKS. RAI-HAEL TUCK AND SONS, 

LONDON, PARIS, AND NK\\ YOHK. 

(Undated.) 



THE CHARACTERS OF CHARLES DICKENS 

PORTRAYED IN 

A SERIES OF ORIGINAL WATER-COLOUR SKETCHES 
BY "KYD." 



"THE PICKWICK PAPERS." 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

SAM WELLER. Chap. X 1 

MR. STIGGINS. Chap. LII 2 

SERJEANT BUZFUZ. Chap. XXXIV. 3 

MR. PICKWICK. Chap. V 4 

MRS. BARDELL. Chap. XII 5 

THE FAT BOY. Chap. IV 6 

MR. WELLER, SENIOR. Chap. XX 7 

MR. JINGLE. Chap. VII 8 

H H 



FRED BARNARD. 

THE late Fred Barnard, a born artistic humorist, was early 
inspired by Dickens's writings, and, while still a youthful 
artist, was delighted to receive from the publishers and the 
Brothers Dalziel a commission thoroughly after his own 
heart, and happily suited to his tastes and inclinations, in 
being associated as illustrator with the production of the 
popular " Household Edition of Dickens," with its wealth 
of pictorial embellishments. How characteristically Fred 
Barnard's genius and his special qualifications were adapted 
for this undertaking, the very numerous illustrations sup- 
plied by his hand are the best possible evidence. " Martin 
Chuzzlewit," " The Tale of Two Cities," " The Christinas 
Stories," &c., among others, testify to the congenial spirit of 
humorous appreciation the artist so abundantly possessed. It 
is noteworthy that Fred Barnard was at his best when illus- 
trating the writings of Charles Dickens, and has particularly 
justified the policy which selected him as illustrator by the 
felicitous pictures he has produced to illustrate the " Life of 
Charles Dickens," by John Forster, included with the pictorial 
series of the " Household Edition." 

Fred Barnard's inimitable " Dickens Cartoons " are so 
popularly familiar owing to the various issues given to the 
public through the publishing auspices of Messrs. Cassell, 
Fetter and Galpin, that in this summary of Pickwickian 
Illustrators it is here unnecessary to say more concerning 
that gifted artist's highly successful and satisfying conceptions 



470 PICTORIAL PIC'KWICKIANA 

of Sam Weller, Tony Weller, Jingle, the immortal founder 
of the Pickwick Club himself, and similarly well-recognised 
personages drawn from the veracious " Posthumous Papers," 
characters whose popularity has received a further testimony 
at the hands of Fred Barnard, who has invariably taken 
the broadest view of Dickens'* humour, as was this comic 
artistes forte. 



CHARLES GREEN, R.I. 

THE accomplished art of Charles Green, R.I., as it has 
been recognised by the family of the great novelist, has 
seldom been employed more sympathetically, or to more 
excellent advantage, than when that highly-gifted artist 
consummate master of the art of painting in water-colours 
has employed the full force of his power and knowledge for 
the adequate illustration of the writings of Charles Dickens. 

The pictorial artist's qualifications for this feat are very 
evident. He possessed a peculiar insight into the creations of 
the great literary artist ; his own peculiar vein of humour 
was keenly in touch with the individualistic humour of 
Dickens himself; and he treated with rare discrimination 
those themes and situations he selected for artistic illustration. 
While diligently adhering to actual studies from life, his 
sense of quiet pleasantry, always present, is natural, unforced 
and spontaneous, harmonising with the literary spirit of 
the great original, and never lapsing into the element of 
burlesque. It was the fatal spirit of caricature which the 
sensitive Dickens dreaded and found uncongenial, as ill 
according with his own serious intentions. 

Concerning the great literary humourist in this connec- 
tion, it is noteworthy that amongst the crowd of illustrators 
and artists who have gained reputation in this particular 
field delineators grotesque, farcical, serious, or what not, 
according to their respective vocations it has been acknow- 
ledged by those who had the best possible reasons for arriving 
at the novelist's predilections, Charles Green was the one 
artist who seemed to be in completely harmonious accord 



472 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

with Dickens's own conceptions of his writings and his real 
intentions. The novelist accepted himself as a seriously 
earnest literary artist ; his method of working is well known ; 
by direct studies from actual persons and localities, and the 
pains of going to nature in the spirit of an artist seeking 
truth, he has contrived to endow his fictions with those 
realistic aspects solely obtainable by this painstaking 
practice. The consistent study of nature and " working 
from the life, 11 was his accepted theory of conscientious 
realism, and it was in this spirit that Charles Green has con- 
ceived and carried out all his Dickens pictures. Reference 
has been made to the beautiful series of ambitious water- 
colour drawings contributed by Charles Green to successive 
exhibitions of the Institute of Painters in Water-Colours. 
In a collected form this truly noteworthy suite, for the most 
part executed as a commission for the artist's friend, Mr. 
William Lockwood, of Nottingham, may be accepted as an 
adequate memorial alike of Charles Dickens and of his familiar 
fictions. 

In similar spirit of reverence for the originals, Charles 
Green has illustrated with completely realistic fidelity and 
painstaking adherence to the actual studies from nature, 
" The Old Curiosity Shop " for the pictorial " Household 
Edition, 11 as issued, by Messrs. Chapman and Hall ; and in 
later years, on a commission from Messrs. A. and F. Pears, 
to his hand has fallen the congenial task, a labour of love, of 
fully illustrating the famous cycle of Christmas stories, " The 
Christmas Carol, 11 " The Chimes, 11 " The Battle of Life, 11 and 
" The Haunted Man, 11 successive issues of " Pears 1 Annual. 11 
It may be averred that these sympathetic stories have never 
before reached the public under similarly advantageous 
aspects as regards the pictorial side, and in this graphic form 
their circulation has been correspondingly large, extending 
over the whole world. 

Amongst the examples of Charles Green's art in the 
" Pickwickian " field, we have been enabled to reproduce the 



CHARLES GREEN 473 

artist's realistic version of the famous opening session of the 
" Pickwick Club " (as veraciously related by Charles Dickens 
as " Mr. Secretary Boz "), with the immortal founder shown 
in the historical action of addressing his faithful disciples and 
followers. For the privilege of offering this example, now 
engraved for the first time, we have to acknowledge our 
indebtedness to the liberal spirit of Mr. William Lockwood, 
of Aspley Hall, the enlightened collector already men- 
tioned as having secured Charles Green's inimitable series of 
ambitious water-colour drawings inspired by the appreciative 
study of Dickens's writings, and contributed by the artist 
over long successive years to the annual exhibitions of the 
Institute of Painters in Water-Colours, of which the late 
Charles Green was a much esteemed member from a very 
early stage in his artistic career to his recent decease. 

It may be here recorded that the last work illustrated 
by Charles Green was one of Dickens's masterpieces, " Great 
Expectations." The drawings by this incomparable "vanished 
hand " were completely in harmony with the story, thus for 
the first time adequately illustrated. The designs, executed 
for Chapman and Hall, were successfully reproduced by 
photogravure ; it is pathetic to recall that the completed 
work, embellished with the refined and sympathetic plates in 
question, only reached the artist on his death-bed. 




Charles Green, R.I. 

Frontispiece to the Pictorial Edition of Dickens's Complete Works. 
(Illustrated with upwards of nine hundred engravings.) 



H. M. PAGET. 
PICKWICK PICTURES (IN COLOURS). 



PICKWICK PICTUEES. 

A SERIES OF CHARACTER SKETCHES 

FROM 

"THE PICKWICK PAPERS." 
BY tt. M. PAGET. 

LONDON: ERNEST NISTEII, 24 ST. BRIDE STREET, E.C. 

1891. 

Printed (by chromo-lithography) by E. Nister, 
Nuremberg, Bavaria. 



MR. SERJEANT BUZFUZ. SAM WELLER. 

MR. PICKWICK ADDRESSING THE PICKWICK CLUB. 

(This subject is also printed in colours on the tinted 
wrapper.) 

MR. PICKWICK AND THE MiDDLE-AgED LADY. 
ALFRED JINGLE, ESQ. THE FAT BOY. 



CHRISTOPHER COVENY 

(SYDNEY) 



PUBLISHED BY 

THOMAS H. FEILDING, 
SYDNEY. 1883. 



TWENTY SCENES 

FROM 

THE WORKS OF DICKENS, 

DESIGNED AND ETCHED BY 

CHRISTOPHER COVENY. 

SYDNEY : 
PRINTED FOR THOS. H. FEILDING, 

BY 

JOHN SANDS, 374 GEORGE STREET. 
1883. 



[With full-page etchings, crowded with figures. Size of actual 
work, 8x5.] 

ELEVEN PLATES 

TO ILLUSTRATE 

"THE PICKWICK PAPERS." 

[With a truly wonderful title-page etching, an ingenious 
nightmare of characters selected with a free hand from the 
works of Charles Dickens.] 

VOL. II II 



SCENES FROM THE WORKS OF CHARLES DICKENS 

DESIGNED AND ETCHED BY 
CHRISTOPHER COVENY. 

1883. 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS TO " THE PICKWICK PAPERS. " 

ETCHED FRONTISPIECE Pot-pourri OF DICKENS' CHARACTERS. 

MKS. LEO HUNTER'S FETE CHAMPETRE. Chap. XV 1 

THE EATANSWILL ELECTION THE STABLEYARD. Chap. XIII 2 

THE EATANSWILL ELECTION THE PROCESSION. Chap. XIII 3 

THE EATANSWILL ELECTION THE NOMINATION. Chap. XIII 4 

MR. PICKWICK WHEELED TO THE POUND. Chap. XIX 5 

MR. PICKWICK CARRIED BEFORE MR. NUPKINS. Chap. XXIV. ... f> 

FALL OF MR. WINKLE ON THE ICE. Chap. XXX 7 

MR. PICKWICK SLIDING. Chap. XXX 8 

THE CRICKET MATCH AT MUOGLETON. Chap. VII 9 

MR. PICKWICK AT THE REVIEW. Chap. IV 10 

MB. PICKWICK IN PURSUIT OF HIS HAT. Chap. IV Ji 




Title-page to " Scenes from Dickens." 

Designed and etched by Christopher Coveny. 

Published in Sydney, 1883. 



i i 2 



AMERICAN ILLUSTRATORS 



PICKWICK PICTUKES 

BY 

F. 0. C. DARLEY. 



ON THE ROAD TO MANOR FARM. Chap. V 1 

A PLEASANT DAY, WITH AN UNPLEASANT TERMINATION. Chap. XIX. 2 
SAMTEL WELLER MAKES A PILGRIMAGE TO DORKING, AND BEHOLDS 

HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW. Chap. XXVII 3 

A FAMILY PARTY INTERVIEWS IMPRISONED SAM IN THE FLEET. 

Chap. XLV 4 



489 







r.Rcfcwict'unafirtoo'k to cLrLve and. 
toxide and tew they ioh did it" 

ON THK ROAD TO MANOR FARM." (Ch.ip. V.) 



491 




'"Whai3 -flie matter vri^i -tha dogs' lags P' -vyhicperQd Mr 
"Wnkle.'Kowqueerthjyre standing:" 

'A PLEASANT DAY, WITH AN UNPLEASANT TERMINATION." (Chap. XIX.) 



493 




of Jmllaitteiel toast was gsntly Biuiinann^ lefore the Cro, 
end the rednos&dmaji hnnpelt'sraa busily engaged to coin-callrig 
alnrge slice of hroail toto the same agreeal>le ediblo" 

' SAMUEL WEI.LER MAKES A PILOEIMAOE TO DORKING, AND BF.HOLDS HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW.' 
(Chap. XXVII.) 



495 




t near sir? *fa fas same place yannj? inaii* 
uitliBsaiae place, 

FAMILY PARTY INTERVIEWS IMPRISONED SAM IN THE FLEET." (Chap. XLV.) 



F. O. C. BARLEY. 

IN addition to his smaller designs for the sympathetic illus- 
tration of " THE PICKWICK PAPERS," the late F. O. C. Darley pro- 
duced a series of large character cartoons to the works of Charles 
Dickens, somewhat after the description of those spirited 
cartoons produced earlier by the late FRED BARNARD. By 
special artistic qualities, both artists were intimately in touch 
with their author, and these dual cartoons are alike inspired 
by the true humorous conception, fine feeling for character, 
and sympathetic artistic appreciation which distinguished 
these admirable designers and playful humourists ; each dis- 
tinctive in respective walks of the same vocation. 

The larger Dickens cartoons by F. O. C. Darley were pub- 
lished in two series in 1888, issued in folio, the size of the 
reproductions, as concerns the actual work, being 15 x 12. 



VOL, il K K 



CHARACTER SKETCHES 

PROM 

THE WORKS OF CHARLES DICKENS 
BY F. 0. C. BARLEY. 

PUBLISHED BY MESSRS. POUTER AND COATES, PHILADELPHIA. 

1888. 

FIRST SERIES. 

CLEMENCY NEWCOME AXD BEX BRITAIX. 
LITTLE NELL AND HER GRANDFATHER. 

TONY WELLEII " THE OLD UN." 

BARNABY RUDGE. OLIVER TWIST. 

JOE GARGERY. 

SECOND SERIES. 

CALEB PLUMMER AND HIS BLIND DAUGHTER. 
DOLLY VARDEN AND HUGH OF THE MAYPOLE INN. 
OLIVER TWIST CLAIMED BY BILL SIKES AND NANCY. 
JOHN WlLLET AND RlJDGE THE MURDERER. 
MRS. GARGERY ON THE RAMPAGE. 

DlCK SwiVELLER AND QuiLP. 

SAM WELLER. 

The two cartoons devoted to " THE PICKWICK PAPERS " 
represent the respective Wellers : 

TONY WELLER "THE OLD UN." 

"At last the stout man, putting up his leg on the seat, and leaning his 
back against the wall, began to puff at his pipe without leaving off at all, 
and to stare through the smoke at the new-comers, as if he had made up 
his mind to see the most he could of them." " PICKWICK PAPERS," 
Chap. XX. 

SAM WELLER. 

" ' Sam.' 

" ' Hallo !' replied the man with the white hat. 

" ' Number Twenty-two wants his boots.' 

" 'Ask Number Twenty-two whether he'll have 'em now, or wait till he 
gets 'em?' was the reply. " PICKWICK PAPKRS," Chap. X. 

K K 2 



S. EYTINGE. 

PUBLISHED BY MESSKS. TICKXOU AXD FIELDS, 
BOSTON, U.S., 1867. 



THE AMEKICAN DIAMOND EDITION 



OF 



THE PICKWICK PAPERS, 



SIXTEEN ORIGINAL WOOD-CUT ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Designed by S. EYTINGE, JUN. 
Engraved by A. V. S. ANTHONY. 



TICKNOII AND FIELDS, BOSTON. 
1867. 



SIXTEEN ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS 

DESIGNED BY S. EYTINGE, JUN. 

LlST O F I L L U S T 11 A T I O N S . 

[Engraved under the superintendence of A. V. S. Anthony.] 

THE PICKWICK CLUB 1 

Miss WARDLE AND HER NIECES 2 

MR. PICKWICK AND SAM WELLER 3 

MRS. LEO HUNTER'S PARTY 4 

MR. ALFRED JINGLE JOB TROTTER 5 

MESSRS. DODSON AND FOGG 6 

MR. NUPKINS'S COURT 7 

MRS. BARDELL AND FRIENDS 8 

THE REV. MR. STIGGINS AND MRS. WELLER 9 

MEETING OF THE BRICK LANE BRANCH, U.G.J.E.T.A. 
(United Grand Junction Ebenezer Temperance Asso- 
ciation) : 10 

CAPTAIN DOWLER 11 

THE "SWARRY" 12 

MR. BOB SAWYER AND MR. BEN ALLEN 13 

MIVINS AND SMANGLE 14 

THF, FAT BOY 15 

OLD WELLER AND THE COACHMEN . 16 




4 



THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE 
PICKWICK CLUB. 

BY CHARLES DICKENS. 

WITH FIFTV-TWO ILLUSTRATIONS BY THOMAS NAST. 

NEW YOHK : 

HARPER AND BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, FRANKLIN SQUARE. 

1873. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS BY THOMAS NAST. 

"WENT SLOWLY AND GRAVELY DOWN THE SLIDE, WITH HIS FEET 
ABOUT A YARD AND A QUARTER APART." Frontispiece. Full Page. 
Chap. XXX 1 

MR. PICKWICK STANDING BENEATH THE MISTLETOE. Full Page. 
Chap. XXVIII 2 

SAM WELLER. Vignette on title page 3 

" THE PlCKWICKIANS ASSEMBLED AT THEIR CLUB MEETING, May 12, 

1827." Chap. 1 4 

"MR. PICKWICK ADDRESSING THE CLUB HE HAD HIMSELF FOUNDED." 
Chap. 1 5 

"HAVE YOU GOT EVERYTHING ?' SAID MR. WlNKLE IN AN AGITATED 

TONE." Chap. II 6 

"NEVER SHALL I FORGET THE REPULSIVE SIGHT THAT MET MY EYE 

AS I TURNED ROUND." Chap. Ill 7 

"MR. SNODGRASS SEIZED HIS REVERED LEADER BY THE COAT-TAIL 

AND DRAGGED HIM BACKWARD." Chap. Ill 8 

"MR. PICKWICK DISPLAYED THAT PERFECT COOLNESS AND SELF- 
POSSESSION, WHICH ARE THE INDISPENSABLE ACCOMPANIMENTS OF 
A GREAT MIND." Chap. IV 9 

''BLESS MY SOUL!' EXCLAIMED THE AGONIZED MR. PICKWICK, 

'THERE'S THE OTHER HORSE RUNNING AWAY !'" Chap. V. ... 10 

" TO DESCRIBE THE CONFUSION THAT ENSUED WOULD BE IMPOSSIBLE " 

Chap. VII. ... 11 



506 PICTORIAL PICKWICKIANA 

MR. TUPMAN. (Full page character sketch). Chap. VIII 12 

"'HE KNOWS NOTHING OF WHAT HAS HAPPENED,' HE WHISPERED." 

Chap. VIII 13 

" ' HURRA !' ECHOED MR. PICKWICK, TAKING OFF HIS HAT AND DASH- 
ING IT ON THE FLOOR, AND INSANELY CASTING HIS SPECTACLES 
INTO THE MIDDLE OF THE KITCHEN." Chap. VIII 14 

" ' MR. WINKLE, TAKE YOUR HANDS OFF. MR. PICKWICK, LET ME 

GO, SIR!'" Chap. IX 15 

"'Is THIS THE ROOM?' MURMURED THE LITTLE GENTLEMAN. SAM 

NODDED ASSENT." Chap. X. 16 

"'HE, TOO, WILL HAVE A COMPANION,' RESUMED MR. PlCKWICK." 

Chap. XII 17 

'" HE'S KISSING 'EM ALL !'" Chap. XIII 18 

"A MOST EXTRAORDINARY CHANGE SEEMED TO COME OVER IT." 

Chap. XIV 19 

" ' COME ON, SIR!' REPLIED MR. PICKWICK." Chap. XV 20 

"THAT IMMORTAL GENTLEMAN COMPLETELY OVER THE WALL." 

Chap. XVI 21 

"SiR!' EXCLAIMED MR. WINKLE, STARTING FROM HIS CHAIR." 

Chap. XVIII 22 

MR. WINKLE. (Full page character sketch). Chap. XIX 23 

"'WHO ARE YOU, YOU RASCAL?'" Chap. XIX 24 

" ' PRAY DO IT, SIR ! '" Chap. XX 25 

"'SHE'S BEEN GETTIN RAYTHER IN THE METHODISTICAL ORDER 

LATELY, SAMMY.'" Chap. XXII 26 

"' WRETCH !' SAID THE LADY." Chap. XXII 27 

"'WHAT IS THE MEANING OF THIS, SIR?'" Chap. XXIV 28 

"'WELL, NOW !' SAID SAM." Chap. XXV 29 

'"I SUPPOSE YOU'VE HEARD WHAT'S GOING FORWARD, MR. WELLER ?' 

SAID MRS. BARDELL." Chap. XXVI 30 

"'GOVERNOR IN?' INQUIRED SAM." Chap. XXVII 31 

" IT WAS A PLEASANT THING TO SEE MR. PlCKWICK IN THE CENTRE 

OF THE GROUP." Chap. XXVIII 32 

"HlS EYES RESTED ON A FORM THAT MADE HIS BLOOD RUN COLD." 

Chap. XXIX 33 

"'I WISH YOU'D LET ME BLEED YOU ! '" Chap. XXX 34 

"A LARGE MASS OF ICE DISAPPEARED." Chap. XXX 35 

"'GET ALONG WITH YOU, YOU OLD WRETCH !'" Chap. XXXII 36 

"THE PARTICULAR PICTURE ON WHICH SAM WfiLLER'S EYES WERE 

FIXED." Chap. XXXIII 37 

SAM WELLER. " ' No, I DON'T, MY LORD,' REPLIED SAM, STARING 

RIGHT UP INTO THE LANTERN IN THE ROOF OF THE COURT." 

(Full page character sketch). Chap. XXXIV 38 

"THEN HAVING DRAWN ON HIS GLOVES WITH GREAT NICETY." 

Chap. XXXIV 39 

" HAVING TAKEN A SHORT WALK THROUGH THE CITY." Chap. XXXV. 40 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 507 

" PACKED trp A FEW NECESSARIES READY FOR FLIGHT." Chap. XXXVI. 41 
"'BLESS MY SOUL,' EVERYBODY SAYS, 'SOMEBODY TAKEN SUDDENLY 

ILL ! SAWYER, LATE NOCKEMORF, SENT FOR ! ' " Chap. XXXVIII. 42 

"'LoR, DO ADUN, MR. WELLER.'" Chap. XXXIX 43 

' ' DON'T BE LONGER THAN YOU CAN CONVENIENTLY HELP, SIR. You'RE 

RAYTHER HEAVY !'" Chap. XXXIX 44 

"'COME ON BOTH OF YOU BOTH OF YOU ! ' " Chap. XLI 45 

"MR. STIGGINS RAISED HIS HANDS, AND TURNED UP HIS EYES." 

Chap. XLV 46 

"THE ARRIVAL OF TWO MOST UNEXPECTED VISITORS." Chap. XLVIII. 47 
"RESUMING HIS KICKING WITH GREATER AGILITY THAN BEFORE." 
Chap. LII 48 

" ' WILL YOU HAVE SOME OF THIS?' SAID THE FAT BOY." Chap. LIV. 49 

" ' ALL I SAY is, JUST YOU KEEP IT TILL I ASK YOU FOR IT AGAIN.' " 

Chap. LVI 50 

MR. SNODGRASS "REPUTED A GREAT POET AMONG HIS FRIENDS." 

(Full page character sketch). Chap. LVII 51 

" MR. PICKWICK'S RETIREMENT AT DULWICH SAM WELLER FOL- 
LOWING HIS MASTER BENT UPON A PLEASANT STROLL." Tail 

piece the end. Cha'p. LVII 52 



ARTHUR B. FROST. (1881.) 



THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE 
PICKWICK CLUB. 



WITH TWELVE ORIGINAL FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS BY 
ARTHUR B. FROST. 



LONDON : 

WARD, LOCK AND Co., WARWICK HOUSE, SALISBURY 
SQUARE, E.C. (1881.) 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS BY ARTHUR B. FROST. 

"'ALL TAPS is VANITIES,' REPLIED MR. SxiooiNS." Frontispiece. 

Chap. XLV 1 

" BLOW'D IF THE GENTLEMAN WORN ? T A GETTIN* UP THE WRONG 

SIDE." Chap. V 2 

"I CAN DISCERN A CROSS AND A B, AND THEN AN I." Chap. XI. 3 
'"COME ON, SIR,' REPLIED MR. PlCKWICK." Chap. XIII 4 

" 'WHERE ARE THEY? WHY, HERE THEY ARE!'" Chap. XIX. ... 5 
"MR. PICKWICK PROCEEDED TO ADDRESS THE MULTITUDE." 

Chap. XXIII 6 

"'STOP AN INSTANT, SAM,' GASPED MR. WlNKLE." Chap. XXX. 7 
" 'I AM ALL RIGHT, SIR,' REPLIED MR. SlIGGINS.'" Chap. XXXIII. 8 
"MR. TUCKLE DANCED THE FROG HORNPIPE AMONG THE DISHES." 

Chap. XXXVII 9 

"'WELL, WILL YOU KNOW ME AGAIN?' SAID MR. SMANGLE." 

Chap. XLII 10 

" IMMERSING MR. STIGGINS' HEAD IN A HORSE-TROUGH FULL OF 

WATER." Chap. LII 11 

"'WHAT'S THE MATTER?' INQUIRED THE CLERK. Chap. L1V. ... 12 



r 



Grego, Joseph (ed.) 
^577 Pictorial Pickwickiana 
G7 
v.2 




UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LIBRARY